Devil In The Grove

Author: Gilbert King
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062097717
Size: 45.57 MB
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Devil in the Grove, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, is a gripping true story of racism, murder, rape, and the law. It brings to light one of the most dramatic court cases in American history, and offers a rare and revealing portrait of Thurgood Marshall that the world has never seen before. As Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns did for the story of America’s black migration, Gilbert King’s Devil in the Grove does for this great untold story of American legal history, a dangerous and uncertain case from the days immediately before Brown v. Board of Education in which the young civil rights attorney Marshall risked his life to defend a boy slated for the electric chair—saving him, against all odds, from being sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit.

Time Thurgood Marshall

Author: The Editors of TIME
Publisher: Time Inc. Books
ISBN: 1683301072
Size: 12.58 MB
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As an accomplished civil rights lawyer, then serving as the first African-American justice on the Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall changed the face and course of justice in America, becoming an inspirational figure for millions. From his early days at Howard University, to his 25-year association with the NAACP, and the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education, he championed and triumphed in dozens of cases on civil liberties, affirmative action, the rights of the accused, and the death penalty. As a Supreme Court Justice, his interpretation of the Constitution led to the insurance of fair treatment for the disadvantaged in a world where judges, police, and legislatures could not be counted on to use their power fairly, and he became a voice for the voiceless. Now, in a new Special Edition from TIME, Thurgood Marshall: The Visionary, his life and legacy are examined through thoughtful essays and historic photographs. This Special Edition traces his upbringing in Baltimore, MD, his years in college and law school, his work with the NAACP, his relationship with Lyndon Johnson and more. Chapters outline the major cases that came before the Court during his tenure along with his position, and another, ÒIn Their Own Words,Ó brings together thoughtful remembrances from those who knew and worked alongside him, including Vernon Jordon, Juan Williams and Constance Baker Motley. Firmly placing Marshall in the context of his time as a visionary and examining how his social and legal legacy lives on to this day, Thurgood Marshall is a thoughtful portrait of a great American.

Showdown

Author: Wil Haygood
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385353162
Size: 41.89 MB
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Thurgood Marshall brought down the separate-but-equal doctrine, integrated schools, and not only fought for human rights and human dignity but also made them impossible to deny in the courts and in the streets. In this stunning new biography, award-winning author Wil Haygood surpasses the emotional impact of his inspiring best seller The Butler to detail the life and career of one of the most transformative legal minds of the past one hundred years. Using the framework of the dramatic, contentious five-day Senate hearing to confirm Marshall as the first African-American Supreme Court justice, Haygood creates a provocative and moving look at Marshall’s life as well as the politicians, lawyers, activists, and others who shaped—or desperately tried to stop—the civil rights movement of the twentieth century: President Lyndon Johnson; Congressman Adam Clayton Powell Jr., whose scandals almost cost Marshall the Supreme Court judgeship; Harry and Harriette Moore, the Florida NAACP workers killed by the KKK; Justice J. Waties Waring, a racist lawyer from South Carolina, who, after being appointed to the federal court, became such a champion of civil rights that he was forced to flee the South; John, Robert, and Ted Kennedy; Senator Strom Thurmond, the renowned racist from South Carolina, who had a secret black mistress and child; North Carolina senator Sam Ervin, who tried to use his Constitutional expertise to block Marshall’s appointment; Senator James Eastland of Mississippi, the head of the Senate Judiciary Committee, who stated that segregation was “the law of nature, the law of God”; Arkansas senator John McClellan, who, as a boy, after Teddy Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to dinner at the White House, wrote a prize-winning school essay proclaiming that Roosevelt had destroyed the integrity of the presidency; and so many others. This galvanizing book makes clear that it is impossible to overestimate Thurgood Marshall’s lasting influence on the racial politics of our nation. From the Hardcover edition.

Conviction

Author: Denver Nicks
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1613738366
Size: 27.96 MB
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On New Year's Eve, 1939, a horrific triple murder occurred in rural Oklahoma. Within a matter of days, investigators identified several suspects: convicts who had been at a craps game with one of the victims the night before. Also at the craps game was a young black farmer named W. D. Lyons. As anger at authorities grew, political pressure mounted to find a villain. The governor's representative settled on Lyons, who was arrested, tortured into signing a confession, and tried for the murder. The NAACP's new Legal Defense and Education Fund sent its young chief counsel, Thurgood Marshall, to take part in the trial. The NAACP desperately needed money, and Marshall was convinced that the Lyons case could be a fundraising boon for both the state and national organizations. It was. The case went on to the US Supreme Court, and the NAACP raised much-needed money from the publicity. Conviction is the story of Lyons v. Oklahoma, the oft-forgotten case that set Marshall and the NAACP on the path that led ultimately to victory in Brown v. Board of Education and the accompanying social revolution in the United States.

Smoketown

Author: Mark Whitaker
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501122398
Size: 35.16 MB
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“Smoketown brilliantly offers us a chance to see this other black renaissance and spend time with the many luminaries who sparked it…It’s thanks to such a gifted storyteller as Whitaker that this forgotten chapter of American history can finally be told in all its vibrancy and glory.”—The New York Times Book Review The other great Renaissance of black culture, influence, and glamour burst forth joyfully in what may seem an unlikely place—Pittsburgh, PA—from the 1920s through the 1950s. Today black Pittsburgh is known as the setting for August Wilson’s famed plays about noble but doomed working-class strivers. But this community once had an impact on American history that rivaled the far larger black worlds of Harlem and Chicago. It published the most widely read black newspaper in the country, urging black voters to switch from the Republican to the Democratic Party and then rallying black support for World War II. It fielded two of the greatest baseball teams of the Negro Leagues and introduced Jackie Robinson to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Pittsburgh was the childhood home of jazz pioneers Billy Strayhorn, Billy Eckstine, Earl Hines, Mary Lou Williams, and Erroll Garner; Hall of Fame slugger Josh Gibson—and August Wilson himself. Some of the most glittering figures of the era were changed forever by the time they spent in the city, from Joe Louis and Satchel Paige to Duke Ellington and Lena Horne. Mark Whitaker’s Smoketown is a captivating portrait of this unsung community and a vital addition to the story of black America. It depicts how ambitious Southern migrants were drawn to a steel-making city on a strategic river junction; how they were shaped by its schools and a spirit of commerce with roots in the Gilded Age; and how their world was eventually destroyed by industrial decline and urban renewal. Whitaker takes readers on a rousing, revelatory journey—and offers a timely reminder that Black History is not all bleak.

Der Tod Wird Euch Finden

Author: Lawrence Wright
Publisher: DVA
ISBN: 3641019087
Size: 61.46 MB
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In einer packenden Erzählung schildert der Journalist Lawrence Wright erstmals umfassend die Vorgeschichte des 11. September. Vier Männer stehen im Mittelpunkt: Osama Bin Laden und seine Nummer zwei, Aiman al-Sawahiri, der FBI-Mann John O’Neill und der saudische Geheimdienstchef Turki al-Faisal. Meisterhaft verknüpft Wright ihre Lebenswege zu einem Gesamtbild der Ereignisse, Wendepunkte, Versäumnisse und Fehleinschätzungen, die den Anschlägen vorangingen. »Wo ihr auch sein mögt, der Tod wird euch finden, und wäret ihr im hohen Turm.« Mit diesen dem Koran entlehnten Worten mahnte Osama Bin Laden seine Kämpfer, furchtlos dem Tod entgegenzusehen. Im Rückblick lassen sie sich auch als düstere Warnung an den Feind lesen, dessen Hochhaustürme in New York zum Angriffsziel wurden. Osama Bin Ladens Aufstieg zum bekanntesten Terroristen des 21. Jahrhunderts bildet einen der Erzählstränge in der bislang vollständigsten Rekonstruktion der Vorgeschichte des 11. September durch den Journalisten Lawrence Wright. Daneben verfolgt Wright, der jahrelang recherchierte und Hunderte von Interviews führte, den Werdegang des al-Qaida-Mitstreiters Aiman al-Sawahiri, des obersten Terroristenfahnders des FBI, John O’Neill, der ausgerechnet in den Trümmern des World Trade Centers starb, sowie des saudischen Königssohns Turki al-Faisal, der als Geheimdienstchef seines Landes zwischen beiden Welten wandelte. Zu einer fesselnden Erzählung verwoben, erhellen die Lebensgeschichten zugleich die Hintergründe des Anschlags: die wachsende Radikalisierung der Islamisten, die Zerrissenheit arabischer Staaten, die widersprüchliche Haltung des Westens. Eine unglaublich spannende und gewinnbringende Lektüre. • Ein tiefer Einblick in Denken und Handeln der al-Qaida-Führer und ihrer wichtigsten Kontrahenten • Eines der besten Bücher des Jahres 2006 in Großbritannien und Amerika, Pulitzer-Preis 2007

Solange Du Lebst

Author: Louise Erdrich
Publisher: Aufbau Digital
ISBN: 3841217230
Size: 77.32 MB
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»Louise Erdrichs leuchtendes Meisterwerk.« Philip Roth. Die kleine Stadt Pluto in North Dakota scheint am Rande des Universums zu liegen. Hier ist jeder mit jedem verbunden – durch Liebe, Freundschaft oder Blutsbande. Und vor allem durch eine dunkle Geschichte, die seit fast einhundert Jahren auf den Menschen lastet. »Ein chorisches Gesamtwerk, dessen erstaunlicher Registerreichtum Witz und Poesie, Lakonie und Pathos gleichermaßen einschließt, derart raffiniert, dass wir am Schluss das Buch sofort noch einmal lesen wollen. Mag Pluto noch so weit entfernt und unwirtlich erscheinen – in diesem Geschichtenkosmos fühlt man sich dort plötzlich seltsam heimisch.« Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

Das Wunder Von Berlin

Author: Daniel James Brown
Publisher: Riemann Verlag
ISBN: 3641093309
Size: 53.42 MB
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Der Millionenseller aus den USA Von Beginn an ist es eine Reise mit unwahrscheinlichem Ausgang: Neun junge Männer aus der amerikanischen Provinz machen sich 1936 auf den Weg nach Berlin, um die Goldmedaille im Rudern zu gewinnen. Daniel James Brown schildert das Schicksal von Joe Rantz, einem Jungen ohne Perspektive, der rudert, um den Dämonen seiner Vergangenheit zu entkommen und seinen Platz in der Welt zu finden. Wie er und seine Freunde vor den laufenden Kameras Leni Riefenstahls den Nazis ihre Propagandashow stehlen, ist ein atemberaubendes Abenteuer und zugleich das eindringliche Porträt einer Ära. Eine unvergessliche wahre Geschichte von Entschlossenheit, Überleben und Mut.