Psychology Of Hope

Author: C.R. Snyder
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439118779
Size: 72.23 MB
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Why do some people lead positive, hope-filled lives, while others wallow in pessimism? In The Psychology of Hope, a professor of psychology reveals the specific character traits that produce highly hopeful individuals. He offers a test to measure one's level of optimism and gives specific advice on how to become a more hopeful person.

The Dark Side Of Hope

Author: Karen Krett
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465392319
Size: 43.55 MB
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"Using her deep understanding of self-psychological theory and her own extensive clinical experience, Karen Krett offers us a scholarly yet down-to-earth examination of hope. For too long, hope has been promoted as an unmitigated virtue without any consideration of its dark side. Yet as Krett shows through revealing clinical examples, hope may also impede development and contribute to psychological suffering. Her book serves as a wonderful guide from hope's dark side to the light." Doris Brothers, Ph.D., author of Toward a Psychology of Uncertainty: Trauma-Centered Psychoanalysis and Falling Backward: An Exploration of Trust and Self-Experience. Hope saturates the cultural air we breathe: in movies, songs, advertising, political slogans and self-help books. Now, for the first time, Karen Krett, LCSW, is putting "hope" on the therapist's couch. Krett examines the duality of hope. In childhood, hope can be the emotional glue that keeps us from falling apart, from losing the thread of life. In adulthood, unconscious patterns of hoping for what can never be often interfere with our ability to make good choices in love and work. It may seem as if giving up any hope would mean the end of us, but Krett offers a refreshingly different perspective: by breaking the hold of the dark side of hope, we can become free to direct ourselves toward hopes which can be realized.

Psychology

Author: Gregory A. Kimble
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262263283
Size: 60.69 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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At a time in the history of psychology when many psychologists are troubled by the splintered condition of the field, Gregory Kimble proposes that the diverse perspectives in psychology share ways of thinking that can bring coherence to the discipline. Drawing on years of extensive research and scholarship (including a deep familiarity with the writings of William James and many psychologists who have succeeded him in a search for unity in psychological theorizing), Kimble presents evidence for this potential unity. He portrays psychology as a natural science with relevance to human life and offers a set of axioms that hold the field together. Psychology is a two-part exploration of the concept of psychology as the science of behavior. The first part describes the traditional commitments of the scientific method and spells out the implications of those commitments for psychology. The second part develops a general theory within a framework that can be called functional behaviorism, which combines the imperative that a science of psychology must be about observable realities with the view that human behavior is the result of evolution. Kimble's proposals are of general significance and have stood the test of time: they were reasonably explicit in the writings of the giants in the history of psychology, and they apply in contexts that range from behavioral neurology to social action. A Bradford Book

A Psychology Of Hope

Author: Kalman J. Kaplan
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802832717
Size: 53.54 MB
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Combines the disciplines of history and psychology to explain the suicidal element in Western culture and how to treat it.

Hope

Author: Paul Cheung
Publisher:
ISBN: 9789881776426
Size: 54.97 MB
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The Oxford Handbook Of Hope

Author: Matthew W. Gallagher
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019939931X
Size: 57.33 MB
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Hope has long been a topic of interest for psychologists, philosophers, educators, and physicians. In the past few decades, researchers from various disciplines and from around the world have studied how hope relates to superior academic performance, improved outcomes in the workplace, and improved psychological and physical health in individuals of all ages. Edited by Matthew W. Gallagher and the late Shane J. Lopez, The Oxford Handbook of Hope provides readers with a thorough and comprehensive update on the past 25 years of hope research while simultaneously providing an outline of what leading hope researchers believe the future of this line of research to be. In this extraordinary volume, Gallagher, Lopez, and their expert team of contributors discuss such topics as how best to define hope, how hope is distinguished from related philosophical and psychological constructs, what the current best practices are for measuring and quantifying hope, interventions and strategies for promoting hope across a variety of settings, the impact it has on physical and mental health, and the ways in which hope promotes positive functioning. Throughout its pages, these experts review what is currently known about hope and identify the topics and questions that will help guide the next decade of research ahead.

Handbook Of Hope

Author: C. Richard Snyder
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 008053306X
Size: 80.46 MB
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Hope has previously been a construct more of interest to philosophy and religion than in psychology. New research has shown, however, that hope is closely related to optimism, feelings of control, and motivation toward achieving one's goals. The Handbook of Hope presents a comprehensive overview of the psychological inquiry into hope, including its measurement, its development in children, how its loss is associated with specific clinical disorders, and therapeutic approaches that can help instill hope in those who have lost theirs. A final section discusses hope in occupational applications: how the use of hope can make one a better coach, teacher, or parent. Key Features * Defines hope as a construct and describes development of hope through the lifespan * Provides multiple instruments for measuring hope * Guides professionals in how to assess hope levels & implement hope as part of therapy * Relates hope to all portions of the population * Includes case studies, figures, and tables to aid understanding of research findings and concepts; discusses the importance of hope to relationships, achieving goals, and success at work

Positive Psychology And Family Therapy

Author: Collie Wyatt Conoley
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470473856
Size: 47.50 MB
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An affirming guide equipping family therapists to effectively incorporate positive psychology within their practices The next step in the evolution of family therapy, positive psychology has enabled family therapists to help families—whatever their form—to build upon their strengths, overcome dysfunction, and move to new levels of harmony and thriving. Positive Psychology and Family Therapy: Creative Techniques and Practical Tools for Guiding Change and Enhancing Growth integrates positive psychology into traditional family therapy, presenting therapists with best-practice wisdom and evidence-based clinical tools to help?turn dysfunctional or troubled families into flourishing families. Contributing a unique perspective to the field that combines the research, practice, and theory associated with the latest in positive psychology and family therapy, Positive Psychology and Family Therapy equips therapists to cultivate virtues, such as empathy, kindness, responsibility, involvement, social justice, work ethic, teamwork, purpose, and volunteerism. Filled with homework assignments and exercises that integrate positive techniques and interventions, this book establishes and promotes the family as the basic building block of the individual and the community. Offering therapists with no previous introduction to positive psychology a solid foundation, this text includes essential discussion of family interventions and techniques that demonstrate positive family therapy, as well as case examples that bring the concepts covered to life in real and accessible scenarios. Authors Collie Conoley and Jane Close Conoley draw from their years of experience working with families to offer an integrated, practical?approach that allows family therapists to utilize positive psychology principles effectively within their practices.

Handbook Of Positive Psychology

Author: C. R. Snyder
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198030942
Size: 65.34 MB
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Psychology has long been enamored of the dark side of human existence, rarely exploring a more positive view of the mind. What has psychology contributed, for example, to our understanding of the various human virtues? Regrettably, not much. The last decade, however, has witnessed a growing movement to abandon the exclusive focus on the negative. Psychologists from several subdisciplines are now asking an intriguing question: "What strengths does a person employ to deal effectively with life?" The Handbook of Positive Psychology provides a forum for a more positive view of the human condition. In its pages, readers are treated to an analysis of what the foremost experts believe to be the fundamental strengths of humankind. Both seasoned professionals and students just entering the field are eager to grasp the power and vitality of the human spirit as it faces a multitude of life challenges. The Handbook is the first systematic attempt to bring together leading scholars to give voice to the emerging field of positive psychology.

A Philosophy Of Human Hope

Author: J.J. Godfrey
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400934998
Size: 68.67 MB
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Few reference works in philosophy have articles on hope. Few also are systematic or large-scale philosophical studies of hope. Hope is admitted to be important in people's lives, but as a topic for study, hope has largely been left to psychologists and theologians. For the most part philosophers treat hope en passant. My aim is to outline a general theory of hope, to explore its structure, forms, goals, reasonableness, and implications, and to trace the implications of such a theory for atheism or theism. What has been written is quite disparate. Some see hope in an individualistic, often existential, way, and some in a social and political way. Hope is proposed by some as essentially atheistic, and by others as incomprehensible outside of one or another kind of theism. Is it possible to think consistently and at the same time comprehensively about the phenomenon of human hoping? Or is it several phenomena? How could there be such diverse understandings of so central a human experience? On what rational basis could people differ over whether hope is linked to God? What I offer here is a systematic analysis, but one worked out in dialogue with Ernst Bloch, Immanuel Kant, and Gabriel Marcel. Ernst Bloch of course was a Marxist and officially an atheist, Gabriel Marcel a Christian theist, and Immanuel Kant was a theist, but not in a conventional way.