Iron Cages

Author: Ronald T. Takaki
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195137378
Size: 63.18 MB
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Now in a new edition, Iron Cages provides a unique comparative analysis of white American attitudes toward Asians, blacks, Mexicans, and Native Americans in the 19th century. This pathbreaking work offers a cohesive study of the foundations of race and culture in America. In a new epilogue, Takaki argues that the social health of the United States rests largely on the ability of Americans of all races and cultures to build on an established and positive legacy of cross-cultural cooperation and understanding in the coming 21st century. Observing that by 2050 all Americans will be minorities, Takaki urges us to ask ourselves: Will America fulfill the promise of equality or will America retreat into its "iron cages" and resist diversity, allowing racial conflicts to divide and possibly even destroy America as a nation? Incisive and provocative, Iron Cages is an essential resource for students of ethnic history and important reading for anyone interested in the history of race relations in America.

The Iron Cage

Author: Rashid Khalidi
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807003158
Size: 36.26 MB
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At a time when a lasting peace between the Palestinians and the Israelis seems virtually unattainable, understanding the roots of their conflict is an essential step in restoring hope to the region. In The Iron Cage, Rashid Khalidi, one of the most respected historians and political observers of the Middle East, homes in on Palestinian politics and history. By drawing on a wealth of experience and scholarship, Khalidi provides a lucid context for the realities on the ground today, a context that has been, until now, notably lacking in our discourse. The story of the Palestinian search to establish a state begins in the mandate period immediately following the breakup of the Ottoman Empire, the era of British control, when fledgling Arab states were established by the colonial powers with assurances of eventual independence. Mandatory Palestine was a place of real promise, with unusually high literacy rates and a relatively advanced economy. But the British had already begun to construct an iron cage to hem in the Palestinians, and the Palestinian leadership made a series of errors that would eventually prove crippling to their dream of independence. The Palestinians' struggle intensified in the stretch before and after World War II, when colonial control of the region became increasingly unpopular, population shifts began with heavy Jewish immigration from Eastern Europe, and power began to devolve to the United States. In this crucial period, Palestinian leaders continued to run up against the walls of the ever-constricting iron cage. They proved unable to achieve their long-cherished goal of establishing an independent state—a critical failure that set a course for the decades that followed, right through the eras of the Palestinian Liberation Organization, the Palestinian Authority, and Hamas. Rashid Khalidi's engrossing narrative of this torturous history offers much-needed perspective for anyone concerned about peace in the Middle East.

At Work In The Iron Cage

Author: Dana M. Britton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814798837
Size: 80.36 MB
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In this first comparative analysis of men's and women's prisons, Dana Britton identifies the factors that influence the genderization of the American workplace, a process that often leaves women in lower-paying jobs with less prestige and responsibility.

The Iron Cage

Author: Nigel Cawthorne
Publisher: Garrett County Press
ISBN: 0966646932
Size: 29.20 MB
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A staggering 30,000 British prisoners of war "liberated" from German POW camps by the Soviets at the end of World War II were never returned home. In investigating the fate of victims of the Cold War, Nigel Cawthorne travelled to Siberia to follow their trail.

The Iron Cage

Author: Catherine Ross
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135148060X
Size: 20.54 MB
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This major study of the father of modern sociology explores the intimate relationship between the events of Max Weber's personal history and the development of his thought. When it was first published in 1970, Paul Roazen described The Iron Cage as ""an example of the history of ideas at its very best""; while Robert A. Nisbet said that ""we learn more about Weber's life in this volume than from any other in the English language.""Weber's life and work developed in reaction to the rigidities of familial and social structures in Imperial Germany. In his youth he was torn by irreconcilable tensions between the Bismarckian authoritarianism of his father and the ethical puritanism of his mother. These tensions led to a psychic crisis when, in his thirties, he expelled his father (who died soon thereafter) from his house. His reaction to the collapse of the European social order before and during World War I was no less personal and profound. It is the triumph of Professor Mitzman's approach that he convincingly demonstrates how the internalizing of these severe experiences led to Weber's pessimistic vision of the future as an ""iron cage"" and to such seminal ideas as the notion of charisma and the concept of the Protestant ethic and its connection with the spirit of capitalism. The author's thesis also serves as a vehicle for describing the social, political, and personal plight of the European bourgeois intellectual of Weber's generation.In synthesizing Weber's life and thought, Arthur Mitzman has expanded and refined our understanding of this central twentieth-century figure. As Lewis Coser writes in the preface, until now ""there has been little attempt to bring together the work and the man, to show the ways in which Weber's cognitive intentions, his choice of problems, were linked with the details of his personal biography. Arthur Mitzman fills this gap brilliantly.

Fleeing The Iron Cage

Author: Lawrence A. Scaff
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520075474
Size: 71.82 MB
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Closing The Iron Cage

Author: Ed Andrew
Publisher: Black Rose Books Limited
ISBN: 9781551641287
Size: 72.71 MB
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A thought-provoking analysis of how the principles of scientific management in the work place have been applied to the organization of leisure time.

The Iron Cage

Author: Brian Freemantle
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1453226672
Size: 23.40 MB
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The CIA closes in on an escaped Nazi hiding out in Panama The CIA sends Hartman because he knows the target’s face. Hartman spent two years in Bergen-Belsen and knows camp commandant Fritz Lang’s face better than anyone. The Nazi has taken up residence in a Panamanian port, supplementing his realtor’s salary with monthly infusions from a numbered Swiss account. Despite Lang’s extensive plastic surgery, Hartman recognizes him. It’s a face he could never forget, and it’s time to make him pay. Rumors have circulated that, in the waning days of World War II, a KGB operative helped Lang and others escape the wrath of the Red Army in exchange for massive bribes. That operative is now the KGB’s top man, and getting the dirt on him would mean destabilizing all of Russian intelligence. Hartman’s task is not to arrest Lang, but to spook him and follow when he runs. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Brian Freemantle including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

The Iron Cage Revisited

Author: R. Bruce Douglass
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135197761X
Size: 24.29 MB
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At the start of the twentieth century, when Germany, among other nations, was undergoing industrialization, Max Weber famously characterized modern life in words that have often been translated as "iron cage." During the industrial era, that image caught on and was often used by scholars to express concerns about the extent to which the actual character of modern life contradicted its emancipatory promise. But we are living in a different time now, when the conditions under which we live seem to be quite different from the ones that pertained in Weber's day. It is a time when, in some respects at least, life seems to be freer and more conducive to experimentation, which has led some people to conclude that our societies have escaped from Weber's "cage." But is that really true? This book challenges that notion, considering the consequences for our way of life of the triumph of neoliberalism as a political force.