The Blasphemer

Author: Waleed Al-Husseini
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1628726741
Size: 34.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2017
Download
The Infuriating Tale Of A Young Palestinian Punished For Exercising His Freedom Of Speech. Like many of his generation, Waleed Al-Husseini began a blog in his twenties. However, unlike many, Waleed also had the misfortune of having been a blogger in Palestine; worse yet, he often criticized Islam and its adherents—and declared himself an apostate—in his writings. The Palestinian Authority did not take well to this and eventually put Waleed in jail without a trial or even a wisp of legal justification. As if this was not bad enough, they placed Waleed in solitary confinement. This state of affairs continued for 11 months. Over the course of this time, Waleed was tortured and suffered innumerable indignities and deprivations simply for having the audacity to speak his mind. Eventually his unjust imprisonment began to draw international attention from foreign governments and human rights organizations, which pressured the Palestinian Authority and finally forced it to provide him a trial and parole. After being paroled, Waleed fled Palestine, first to Jordan and then to France, where he has become an outspoken advocate for freedom of speech and a critic of the state of contemporary Islam. The Blasphemer is a sobering, impassioned recounting of this Kafkaesque experience as well as a searing polemic against the corruption and hypocrisy that define contemporary Palestine.

The Islamist

Author: Ed Husain
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143115984
Size: 13.61 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5566
Download
The author describes how, at the age of sixteen, he became an Islamic fundamentalist, and after much emotional turmoil rejected the fundamentalist teachings and returned to his previous life and family.

The Death Instinct

Author: Jacques Mesrine
Publisher: Tamtam Books
ISBN: 9780966234688
Size: 52.78 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3373
Download
France's Public Enemy Number One from the late 1960s to the end of the 1970s--when he was killed by police in a sensational traffic shootout--Jacques Mesrine (1936-1979) is the best-known criminal in French history. Mesrine was notorious both for his violent exploits and for the media attention he attracted, and he remains very much a public media figure in France and Europe. In 2008 there were two feature-length films based on his life, one of them starring Vincent Cassel in the lead role. Mesrine wrote "The Death Instinct" while serving time in the high-security prison La Sante; the manuscript was smuggled out of the prison and was later published by Guy Debord's publisher Gerard Lebovici (who briefly adopted Mesrine's daughter, Sabrina, before being assassinated, a few years after Mesrine). "The Death Instinct" deals with the early years of Mesrine's criminal life, including a horrifically graphic description of a murder he committed early on in his career and a highly detailed account of the workings of the French criminal underworld--making this book perhaps one of the most intriguing and detailed anthropological studies of a criminal culture ever written.

A God Who Hates

Author: Wafa Sultan
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429984539
Size: 17.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1450
Download
From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arabic woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. "How can such a culture be anything but barbarous?", Sultan asks. "It can't", she concludes "because any culture that hates its women can't love anything else." She believes that the god who hates is waging a battle between modernity and barbarism, not a battle between religions. She also knows that it's a battle radical Islam will lose. Condemned by some and praised by others for speaking out, Sultan wants everyone to understand the danger posed by A God Who Hates.

The Saudi Enigma

Author: Pascal Ménoret
Publisher: Zed Books
ISBN: 9781842776056
Size: 27.95 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6908
Download
'Finally, we have a book by someone who has a robust social science approach to what is a modern and fast-changing society, who has lived in, and thought a lot about, the country, who does not fall into conspiracy theory, who avoids the anti-Saudi banalities of the outside world as much as the pieties of the regime, who, in a word, tells us how the country actually works.' - Professor Fred Halliday, London School of Economics'A treasure-house of precise references and analyses, this book does not set out to provide simple answers, but to illustrate the great complexity of the country and to account for the deep changes it has gone through. Particularly enlightening on the current crisis and the official response to it since 2002.' - Sophie Pommier, Le Monde DiplomatiqueSaudi Arabia is a major piece on the world geopolitical chessboard. Despite the suspicion that has enveloped the country since September 11 2001, Saudi Arabia remains the key US ally in the Arab Middle East, a role secured by its continuing position as the world's largest oil exporter and its ever growing influence in the Muslim world. Yet the country is still very poorly understood. Western observers have rarely been able to penetrate this closed society and its opaque political system. Clich‚s about the role of oil wealth and fundamentalist Wahhabi Islam often serve to further mask the reality. The true complexity of Saudi society cannot be reduced to a mixture of poorly assimilated modernity and medieval Bedouin tradition. This volume illustrates the emerging autonomous - and Islamic - manifestations of Saudi national identity, fiercely reformist rather than medieval, complex and varied rather than merely a justification or support for the rule of the al-Saud royal family. Underlying M‚noret's account is a sophisticated economic history of the Saudi state, from the eighteenth century to the present day, which details all the alliances and manoeuvres that have brought the country and its rulers to their current precarious position.

Time Work And Culture In The Middle Ages

Author: Jacques Le Goff
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226470818
Size: 69.99 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4439
Download
Studies a wide range of topics concerning Medieval society, including the universities, folklore, and economy of the Middle Ages

Education And The Making Of Modern Iran

Author: David Menashri
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780801426124
Size: 70.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6295
Download
To seek knowledge is an Islamic obligation, and religious schools traditionally disseminated the particulars of Islamic thought and culture in Iran. Early in the nineteenth century, however, the lure of modern military technology prompted Iranian leaders to seek Western scientific knowledge. Drawing on a wealth of original research, David Menashri traces the history of Iran's educational system from the departure of the first two Iranian students to Europe in 1811, through the founding of Tehran University in 1935, to the changes in educational policies enacted under the Ayatollah Khomeini. In so doing, Menashri chronicles the wider political and social history of the struggle for control of education between the ulama, or religious elite, and the state. Paying particular attention to the development of higher education, Menashri assesses the contribution--as well as the limitations--of educational reform in the making of modern Iran. He provides a rich account of the role of Iranians who had been educated abroad and reveals the ambivalence of custodians of power who wanted to import Western skills without Western ideas. Menashri reconstructs the dramatic conflicts and the enduring tensions between groups supporting the values of traditional culture and those promoting Western-oriented "progressive" education. The resulting educational system, he shows, bore fruit in widespread literacy but also contributed to the profound ideological split that led to the overthrow of the Shah in 1979. Historians of education, specialists in Middle Eastern studies, and others interested in contemporary Iran will want to read this penetrating book.

Global Islamophobia

Author: George Morgan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317127722
Size: 16.86 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2350
Download
The decade since 9/11 has seen a decline in liberal tolerance in the West as Muslims have endured increasing levels of repression. This book presents a series of case studies from Western Europe, Australia and North America demonstrating the transnational character of Islamophobia. The authors explore contemporary intercultural conflicts using the concept of moral panic, revitalised for the era of globalisation. Exploring various sites of conflict, Global Islamophobia considers the role played by 'moral entrepreneurs' in orchestrating popular xenophobia and in agitating for greater surveillance, policing and cultural regulation of those deemed a threat to the nation's security or imagined community. This timely collection examines the interpenetration of the global and the local in the West's cultural politics towards Islam, highlighting parallels in the responses of governments and in the worrying reversion to a politics of coercion and assimilation. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology and politics with interests in race and ethnicity; citizenship and assimilation; political communication, securitisation and The War on Terror; and moral panics.

Reason Freedom And Democracy In Islam

Author: Abdolkarim Soroush
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195158202
Size: 58.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3314
Download
The author, one of the leading revisionist thinkers of the Muslim world, examines such matters as the inevitability of change in religion, the necessity of freedom of belief, and the compatibility of Islam with democracy.