A Face Like Glass

A Face Like Glass

A Face Like Glass is an astonishing and imaginative novel from the Costa Award winning author of The Lie Tree, Frances Hardinge. In the underground city of Caverna the world's most skilled craftsmen toil in the darkness to create delicacies beyond compare – wines that can remove memories, cheeses that can make you hallucinate and perfumes that convince you to trust the wearer, even as they slit your throat. The people of Caverna are more ordinary, but for one thing: their faces are as blank as untouched snow. Expressions must be learned, and only the famous Facesmiths can teach a person to show joy, despair or fear – at a price. Into this dark and distrustful world comes Neverfell, a little girl with no memory of her past and a face so terrifying to those around her that she must wear a mask at all times. For Neverfell's emotions are as obvious on her face as those of the most skilled Facesmiths, though entirely genuine. And that makes her very dangerous indeed . . . 'Everyone should read Frances Hardinge. Everyone. Right now.' - Patrick Ness, author of A Monster Calls.

A Face Like Glass

A Face Like Glass


Her Face Like Glass

A Collection of Poems

Her Face Like Glass

The collection is about the subject of love:The good and the bad side.It's about nature.It's about every man and woman on the streets.It has messages and lessons,as well as entertainment in it. It's a must read.

The Moon Shone Bright

A Play

The Moon Shone Bright

The play by inte ationally acclaimed writer, Des Walsh, brings together the turmoil of Newfoundland joining Confederation and its effects up to the present day. Des Walsh was bo in St. John's and first published in 1972. Since then, he has published four books of poetry including Seasonal Bravery and Love and Savagery. A new collection, The Singer's Broken Throat, is in the final stages of preparation. His work for the stage includes Fishwharf and Steamboat Men (Resource Centre for the Arts, LSPU Hall), Tomorrow Will Be Sunday (Rising Tide Theatre, Arts and Culture Centre), The Songs of Weather, Garland House, Play Somethin' We All Knows and Johnny August (Rising Tide Theatre, Summer in the Bight Theatre Festival). In November 1997, he was Playwright-in-Residence at Playwright's Workshop Montreal. He co-wrote the TV drama The Boys of St. Vincent for which he won several awards including a Gemini in Canada and the Umbriafiction award in Italy. His eight-hour TV adaptation of Be ice Morgan's novel Random Passage aired on CBC in January 2002.

The Senecans

Four Men and Margaret Thatcher

The Senecans

A year after the death of Margaret Thatcher, a young historian arrives to ask Peter Stothard, Editor of the Time Literary Supplement and former editor of The Time, some sharp questions about his memories of the Thatcher era. During the interview the offices from where he long observed British politics are being systematically flattened by wrecking balls. From the dust and destruction of a collapsing newspaper plant emerge portraits of the Senecans, four of the men who made the Thatcher court so different from that of her successors. As well as love of Britain's first female Prime Minister they shared strange Latin lessons in a crumbling riverside bar. They took their name from their taste for the work of Lucius Annaeus Seneca, a pioneer writer from Cordoba in Roman Spain, a philosopher, courtier and acquirer of massive wealth from the age of the Emperor Nero.Blending memoir with ancient and modern politics in the manner of his acclaimed diaries, Spartacus Road and Alexandria, Peter Stothard sheds a sideways light on Margaret Thatcher's "believing age", a personal picture of our recent history. In finally identifying his interviewer he also answers questions about his own literary and political journey.

Overboard

A dark, compelling modern suspense novel

Overboard

Thailand. An epic storm. A shipwreck. A white man has been found alive. But who is he? Suffering horrific injuries and burns, he is taken to a local hospital. He is mute. Everything is a blank. They tell him his name. That is all he knows. When his Chinese wife arrives, he has no choice but to return to London to her family. He starts getting better with care and more surgery until one day… he’s assaulted. And he knows why. The blow brings back a dangerous memory. But he’s crippled, disfigured and penniless… and he’s living the life of the man they think he is. What will he risk to uncover the truth? If you like a compelling, suspenseful thriller with witty dialogue and taut, dark storytelling, you'll love Ivy Ngeow's Overboard. Discover today what it means to go Overboard... jump off and start your adventure now.

Similes Dictionary

Similes Dictionary

Whether it invokes hard work or merely a hen-house, a good simile is like a good picture—it's worth a thousand words. Packed with more than 16,000 imaginative, colorful phrases—from “abandoned as a used Kleenex” to “quiet as an eel swimming in oil”—the Similes Dictionary will help any politician, writer, or lover of language find just the right saying, be it original or banal, verbose or succinct. Your thoughts will never be "as tedious as a twice-told tale" or "dry as the Congressional Record." Choose from elegant turns of phrases “as useful as a Swiss army knife” and “varied as expressions of the human face”. Citing more than 2,000 sources—from the Bible, Socrates, Shakespeare, Mark Twain, and H. L. Mencken to popular movies, music, and television shows—the Similes Dictionary covers hundreds of subjects broken into thematic categories that include topics such as virtue, anger, age, ambition, importance, and youth, helping you find the fitting phrase quickly and easily. Perfect for setting the atmosphere, making a point, or helping spin a tale with economy, intelligence, and ingenuity, the vivid comparisons found in this collection will inspire anyone.

The Ice Castle

An Adventure in Music

The Ice Castle

The return to Lexicon begins when thirteen-year-old cousins Ivan and Daphne find their Aunt Adelaide deathly ill. Leaving their aunt to rest, Ivan and Daphne accidentally let their younger cousin, Lila, in on their secret world of Lexicon. Ivan and Daphne must track Lila, who disappears, through the frozen landscape to the Land of Winter where social status and freedom is determined by how well one sings. Fortunately for Lila, her musical talent lands her in the most favorable place. Separated by class now, the cousins face the cold, hunger, poverty, illness, injustice, and the malicious plotting of a power-hungry blind man. Slave, servant, and fine lady, the three cousins must escape their own imprisonment before they reunite, provoke a revolution, and restore spring to the Land of Winter.

Verdigris Deep

Verdigris Deep

In the tradition of truly fantastic storytelling, Verdigris Deep is a darkly witty, utterly creepy and clever novel by Frances Hardinge, author of The Lie Tree. Verdigris n. a blue-green rust that tarnishes ageing and forgotten copper coins, altering them entirely . . . One evening, Ryan and his friends steal some coins from a well. Soon after, strange things begin to happen. Peculiar marks burn on Ryan's knuckles and light bulbs mysteriously explode. Then the well witch appears, with her fountains for eyes and gargled demands. From now on the children must serve her – and the wishes rotting at the bottom of her well. 'Everyone should read Frances Hardinge. Everyone. Right now' - Patrick Ness, author of A Monster Calls.

William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

The second Oxford edition of Shakespeare's Complete Works reconsiders every detail of their text and presentation in the light of modern scholarship. The nature and authority of the early documents are re-examined, and the canon and chronological order of composition freshly established. Spelling and punctuation are modernized, and there is a brief introduction to each work, as well as an illuminating and informative General Introduction. Included here for the first time is the play The Reign of King Edward the Third as well as the full text of Sir Thomas More. This new edition also features an essay on Shakespeare's language by David Crystal, and a bibliography of foundational works.