A General History of the Pyrates

A General History of the Pyrates

Considered the major source of information about piracy in the early 18th century, this fascinating history by the author of Robinson Crusoe profiles the deeds of Edward (Blackbeard) Teach, Captain Kidd, Anne Bonny, others.

A General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pirates

From Their First Rise and Settlement in the Island of Providence to the Present Year

A General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pirates

A General History of the Pirates has long been a classic of seafaring literature and was inspiration to both Robert Louis Stevenson and J.M. Barrie. Nothing is known about Captain Charles Johnson, and it is thought that the name may be assumed - there are even some who believe he may have been Daniel Defoe. All that can be stated with any certainty is that in 1724 a small octavo volume appeared that became so popular it grew through 4 editions over 2 years and is still famed today. Historians from both sides of the Atlantic have attested to the accuracy of the work's content. This is a reprint of the 1927 reissued 4th edition - enhanced by the Arthur L. Hayward's editorial touches.

Maritime Piracy and Its Control: An Economic Analysis

Maritime Piracy and Its Control: An Economic Analysis

Maritime Piracy and its Control develops an economic approach to the problem of modern-day maritime piracy with the goal of assessing the effectiveness of remedies aimed at reducing the incidence of piracy.

At the Point of a Cutlass

The Pirate Capture, Bold Escape, and Lonely Exile of Philip Ashton

At the Point of a Cutlass

A handful of sea stories define the American maritime narrative. Stories of whaling, fishing, exploration, naval adventure, and piracy have always captured our imaginations, and the most colorful of these are the tales of piracy. Called America's real-life Robinson Crusoe, the true story of Philip Ashton--a nineteen-year-old fisherman captured by pirates, impressed as a crewman, subjected to torture and hardship, who eventually escaped and lived as a castaway and scavenger on a deserted island in the Caribbean--was at one time as well known as the tales of Cooper, Hawthorne, and Defoe. Based on a rare copy of Ashton's 1725 account, Gregory N. Flemming's vivid portrait recounts this maritime world during the golden age of piracy. Fishing vessels and merchantmen plied the coastal waters and crisscrossed the Atlantic and Caribbean. It was a hard, dangerous life, made more so by both the depredations and temptations of piracy. Chased by the British Royal Navy, blown out of the water or summarily hung when caught, pirate captains such as Edward Low kidnapped, cajoled, beat, and bribed men like Ashton into the rich--but also vile, brutal, and often short--life of the pirate. In the tradition of Nathaniel Philbrick, At the Point of a Cutlass expands on a lost classic narrative of America and the sea, and brings to life a forgotten world of ships and men on both sides of maritime law.

Spanish Gold

Captain Woodes Rogers and the True Story of the Pirates of the Caribbean

Spanish Gold

The amazing true story of Blackbeard, Calico Jack and all the other pirates of the Caribbean and Captain Woodes Rogers, the privateer turned governor of the Bahamas, who brought them to book.

Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean

The Adventurous Life of Captain Woodes Rogers

Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean

From renowned pirate historian David Cordingly, author of Under the Black Flag and film consultant for the original Pirates of the Caribbean, comes the thrilling story of Captain Woodes Rogers, the avenging nemesis of the worst cutthroats ever to terrorize the high seas. Once a marauding privateer himself, Woodes Rogers went from laying siege to laying down the law. During Britain’s war with Spain, Rogers sailed for the crown in sorties against Spanish targets in the Pacific; battled scurvy, hurricanes, and mutinies; captured a treasure galleon; and even rescued the castaway who inspired Robinson Crusoe. Appointed governor of the Bahamas in 1717, the fearless Rogers defended the island colony of King George I against plundering pirates and an attempted Spanish invasion. His resolute example led to the downfall of such notorious pirates as Blackbeard, Calico Jack, and the female pirates Anne Bonny and Mary Read. A vividly detailed and action-packed portrait of one of the early eighteenth century’s most colorful characters, Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean serves up history that’s as fascinating and gripping as any seafaring legend.

Pirates of New Spain, 1575-1742

Pirates of New Spain, 1575-1742

Captivating, well-documented study focuses on piracy among Spain's Pacific coast colonies, ranging from Panama to points north. Colorful narrative traces exploits of Elizabethan pirates, Dutch raiders, mercenary buccaneers, and English privateers and smugglers.

Jolly Roger

Jolly Roger

Fascinating study of 17th- and 18th-century piracy finds the lore about Henry Morgan, Captain Kidd, Blackbeard, Anne Bonney, and other marauders largely overblown. "Highly entertaining and well-documented." — The New York Times. 35 black-and-white illustrations.

The Naval Chronicle: Volume 6, July-December 1801

Containing a General and Biographical History of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom with a Variety of Original Papers on Nautical Subjects

The Naval Chronicle: Volume 6, July-December 1801

Volume 6 of the Naval Chronicle includes the Preliminary Articles of the Treaty of Amiens and technical naval reports.