A Million Little Pieces

Author: James Frey
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 1400079012
Size: 63.87 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A story of drug and alcohol abuse and rehabilitation as it has never been told before. Recounted in visceral, kinetic prose, and crafted with a forthrightness that rejects piety, cynicism, and self-pity, it brings us face-to-face with a provocative new understanding of the nature of addiction and the meaning of recovery. By the time he entered a drug and alcohol treatment facility, James Frey had taken his addictions to near-deadly extremes. He had so thoroughly ravaged his body that the facilityís doctors were shocked he was still alive. The ensuing torments of detoxification and withdrawal, and the never-ending urge to use chemicals, are captured with a vitality and directness that recalls the seminal eye-opening power of William Burroughsís Junky. But A Million Little Pieces refuses to fit any mold of drug literature. Inside the clinic, James is surrounded by patients as troubled as he is -- including a judge, a mobster, a one-time world-champion boxer, and a fragile former prostitute to whom he is not allowed to speak ó but their friendship and advice strikes James as stronger and truer than the clinicís droning dogma of How to Recover. James refuses to consider himself a victim of anything but his own bad decisions, and insists on accepting sole accountability for the person he has been and the person he may become--which runs directly counter to his counselors' recipes for recovery. James has to fight to find his own way to confront the consequences of the life he has lived so far, and to determine what future, if any, he holds. It is this fight, told with the charismatic energy and power of One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest, that is at the heart of A Million Little Pieces: the fight between one young manís will and the ever-tempting chemical trip to oblivion, the fight to survive on his own terms, for reasons close to his own heart. A Million Little Pieces is an uncommonly genuine account of a life destroyed and a life reconstructed. It is also the introduction of a bold and talented literary voice.

Boom

Author: Julie Rak
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN: 155458941X
Size: 72.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Since the early 1990s, tens of thousands of memoirs by celebrities and unknown people have been published, sold, and read by millions of American readers. The memoir boom, as the explosion of memoirs on the market has come to be called, has been welcomed, vilified, and dismissed in the popular press. But is there really a boom in memoir production in the United States? If so, what is causing it? Are memoirs all written by narcissistic hacks for an unthinking public, or do they indicate a growing need to understand world events through personal experiences? This study seeks to answer these questions by examining memoir as an industrial product like other products, something that publishers and booksellers help to create. These popular texts become part of mass culture, where they are connected to public events. The genre of memoir, and even genre itself, ceases to be an empty classification category and becomes part of social action and consumer culture at the same time. From James Frey’s controversial A Million Little Pieces to memoirs about bartending, Iran, the liberation of Dachau, computer hacking, and the impact of 9/11, this book argues that the memoir boom is more than a publishing trend. It is becoming the way American readers try to understand major events in terms of individual experiences. The memoir boom is one of the ways that citizenship as a category of belonging between private and public spheres is now articulated.

The Oprah Affect

Author: Cecilia Konchar Farr
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791476161
Size: 48.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Essays explore the broad cultural impact of Oprah’s Book Club.

The Late Age Of Print

Author: Ted Striphas
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231148151
Size: 79.74 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Ted Striphas tracks the methods through which the book industry has adapted (or has failed to adapt) to rapid changes in twentieth-century print culture. With examples from trade journals, news media, films, advertisements, and other commercial and scholarly materials, Striphas tells a story of modern publishing that proves, even in a rapidly digitizing world, books are anything but dead. With wit and brilliant insight, he isolates the invisible processes through which books have come to mediate our social interactions and influence our habits of consumption. This edition features a new preface in which Striphas considers the stakes of abandoning printed books in favor of digital readers.

Haunted Narratives

Author: Gabriele Rippl
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442664207
Size: 60.44 MB
Format: PDF
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Exploring life writing from a variety of cultural contexts, Haunted Narratives provides new insights into how individuals and communities across time and space deal with traumatic experiences and haunting memories. From the perspectives of trauma theory, memory studies, gender studies, literary studies, philosophy, and post-colonial studies, the volume stresses the lingering, haunting presence of the past in the present. The contributors focus on the psychological, ethical, and representational difficulties involved in narrative negotiations of traumatic memories. Haunted Narratives focuses on life writing in the broadest sense of the term: biographies and autobiographies that deal with traumatic experiences, autobiographically inspired fictions on loss and trauma, and limit-cases that transcend clear-cut distinctions between the factual and the fictional. In discussing texts as diverse as Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Vikram Seth’s Two Lives, deportation narratives of Baltic women, Christa Wolf’s Kindheitsmuster, Joy Kogawa’s Obasan, and Ene Mihkelson’s Ahasveeruse uni, the contributors add significantly to current debates on life writing, trauma, and memory; the contested notion of “cultural trauma”; and the transferability of clinical-psychological notions to the study of literature and culture.

Writing And Publishing

Author: Tina P. Schwartz
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810869363
Size: 46.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this book, author Tina Schwartz discusses many matters that are not often presented in guides to writing and publishing, such as the importance of mentors and critique groups, as well as courses and extracurricular activities that can be of great help to the up-and-coming teen author. The book explores various writing careers and the basics of publishing and marketing, including how to write query letters. Schwartz also provides tips on writing both fiction and nonfiction, as well as genres a new author can explore, like poetry and songwriting.

Oprah Brand Renew

Author: Nancy F. Koehn
Publisher: Pearson Education
ISBN: 0137060254
Size: 20.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Harvard Business School professor Nancy F. Koehn provides a powerful lesson on brand stewardship in time of crisis. Her subject: Oprah Winfrey. When the integrity of your brand is in danger, Koehn advises, follow Oprah’s lead. Return to your core values. Level with your customers. Prove that you mean it. How would she respond, this thoughtful entrepreneur, who has used her empathy and vision and story sense of responsibility to create one of the most powerful brands in history? In the crucible created by the James Frey controversy, what kind of leadership would Oprah exercise?

Food Lit A Reader S Guide To Epicurean Nonfiction

Author: Melissa Brackney Stoeger
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610693760
Size: 47.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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An essential tool for assisting leisure readers interested in topics surrounding food, this unique book contains annotations and read-alikes for hundreds of nonfiction titles about the joys of comestibles and cooking.

25 Lessons

Author: Nancy Mehagian
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497638429
Size: 71.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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She would age without whining. (Most of the time). She would read until her eyes were blurry. She would love fiercely, laugh ferociously, and let tears fly unabashedly. She would go to nature to heal. And travel with Gayle to let loose. And she would say good-bye with grit and humor and without regret. 25 Lessons: What We Learned from Oprah is an intimate and often lighthearted look at how some of the teachings of The Oprah Winfrey Show influenced the personal lives and career paths of the authors, Southern California friends who, like Oprah, love their dogs, their close friends, a good book, Mother Nature, “aha” moments, and reeeeeaaaaalllly good food. Nancy Mehagian is a teacher, healer, epicurean, and writer (Supernatural Kids Cookbook, Siren’s Feast: An Edible Odyssey). Judith A. Proffer is a former newspaper publisher (LA Weekly, Sun Community Newspapers), entrepreneur (Magpie Gourmet Mini Pies), and writer. As unlikely as it is that a dirt-poor girl from Mississippi would become buddies with the booty-shaking star of Saturday Night Fever are the odds of these two friends ever meeting up. Nancy was a spirited hippie who would open the first vegetarian restaurant on the island of Ibiza, hanging out with the likes of Joni Mitchell and Taj Mahal. Judith was raised in Michigan with corn-fed sensibilities and big-city dreams, longing to meet Walter Cronkite (she did) and own her own newspaper (she did that, too). Along the way, they each got a little lost, they each got a little found, and they happened upon an adventurous and everlasting friendship in each other. And it was Nancy, a frequent Oprah viewer, who encouraged Judith, a decided non-viewer, to watch the pull-out-all-the-stops emotional, engaging, enlightening, and entertaining twenty-fifth and final season. Inspired by the lightning-paced illumination they have each embraced and tried their best (sometimes successfully, sometimes not) to emulate over the years, this book was birthed to offer simple and practical lessons that can offer readers the keys to make changes in their own lives. From the searing reality of the importance of forgiveness (essential, but painful and rarely easy) to the creation of a vision board (fun, fun, fun), 25 Lessons delivers tales of compassion, courage, and evolution. Not to mention the smack in the face of instant karma. Oprah taught the world to live, love, and laugh. With 25 Lessons, Mehagian and Proffer share practical tools for living out loud, loving ourselves, and laughing with the whole of our hearts.

Reading As Therapy

Author: Timothy Aubry
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1587299569
Size: 76.59 MB
Format: PDF
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Why do Americans read contemporary fiction? This question seems simple, but is it? Do Americans read for the purpose of aesthetic appreciation? To satisfy their own insatiable intellectual curiosities? While other forms of media have come to monopolize consumers’ leisure time, in the past two decades book clubs have proliferated, Amazon has sponsored thriving online discussions, Oprah Winfrey has inspired millions of viewers to read both contemporary works and classics, and novels have retained their devoted following within middlebrow communities. In Reading as Therapy, Timothy Aubry argues that contemporary fiction serves primarily as a therapeutic tool for lonely, dissatisfied middle-class American readers, one that validates their own private dysfunctions while supporting elusive communities of strangers unified by shared feelings. Aubry persuasively makes the case that contemporary literature’s persistent appeal depends upon its capacity to perform a therapeutic function. Aubry traces the growth and proliferation of psychological concepts focused on the subjective interior within mainstream, middle-class society and the impact this has had on contemporary fiction. The prevailing tendency among academic critics has been to decry the personal emphasis of contemporary fiction as complicit with the rise of a narcissistic culture, the ascendency of liberal individualism, and the breakdown of public life. Reading as Therapy, by contrast, underscores the varied ideological effects that therapeutic culture can foster. To uncover the many unpredictable ways in which contemporary literature answers the psychological needs of its readers, Aubry considers several different venues of reader-response—including Oprah’s Book Club and Amazon customer reviews—the promotional strategies of publishing houses, and a variety of contemporary texts, ranging from Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner to Anita Shreve’s The Pilot’s Wife to David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest. He concludes that, in the face of an atomistic social landscape, contemporary fiction gives readers a therapeutic vocabulary that both reinforces the private sphere and creates surprising forms of sympathy and solidarity among strangers.