A Nation Of Immigrants Grades 5 8

Author: Robert W. Smith
Publisher: Teacher Created Resources
ISBN: 1420631470
Size: 76.64 MB
Format: PDF
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Encourage students to take an in-depth view of the people and events of specific eras of American history. Nonfiction reading comprehension is emphasized along with research, writing, critical thinking, working with maps, and more. Most titles include a Readers Theater.

A Nation Of Immigrants

Author: Franca Iacovetta
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1487516835
Size: 39.50 MB
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This collection brings together a wide array of writings on Canadian immigrant history, including many highly regarded, influential essays. Though most of the chapters have been previously published, the editors have also commissioned original contributions on understudied topics in the field. The readings highlight the social history of immigrants, their pre-migration traditions as well as migration strategies and Canadian experiences, their work and family worlds, and their political, cultural, and community lives. They explore the public display of ethno-religious rituals, race riots, and union protests; the quasi-private worlds of all-male boarding-houses and of female domestics toiling in isolated workplaces; and the intrusive power that government and even well-intentioned social reformers have wielded over immigrants deemed dangerous or otherwise in need of supervision. Organized partly chronologically and largely by theme, the topical sections will offer students a glimpse into Canada's complex immigrant past. In order to facilitate classroom discussion, each section contains an introduction that contextualizes the readings and raises some questions for debate. A Nation of Immigrants will be useful both in specialized courses in Canadian immigration history and in courses on broader themes in Canadian history.

A Nation Of Immigrants

Author: Susan F. Martin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 113949273X
Size: 58.26 MB
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Immigration makes America what it is and is formative for what it will become. America was settled by three different models of immigration, all of which persist to the present. The Virginia Colony largely equated immigration with the arrival of laborers, who had few rights. Massachusetts welcomed those who shared the religious views of the founders but excluded those whose beliefs challenged the prevailing orthodoxy. Pennsylvania valued pluralism, becoming the most diverse colony in religion, language, and culture. This book traces the evolution of these three models of immigration as they explain the historical roots of current policy debates and options. Arguing that the Pennsylvania model has best served the country, the final chapter makes recommendations for future immigration reform. Given the highly controversial nature of immigration in the United States, this book provides thoughtful analysis, valuable to both academic and policy audiences.

A Nation Of Immigrants

Author: John F. Kennedy
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062892843
Size: 27.84 MB
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This significant contribution to the debate on immigration reform was President John F. Kennedy’s final book and is as timely now as it was when it was first published—now reissued for its 60th anniversary, with a new introduction and foreword. “In this book, President Kennedy tells us what immigrants have done for America, and what America has done for its immigrants. It is one of the dramatic success stories of world history.... It can stand as a testament to a cause President Kennedy cherished, and which we should carry on.” — Robert F. Kennedy Throughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland. This 60th anniversary edition of his posthumously published, timeless work—with a new introduction, a new foreword by Jonathan Greenblatt, the national director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, and updated information on immigration policy reform—offers the late president's inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a chronology of the main events in the history of immigration in America. As continued debates on immigration engulf the nation, this paean to the importance of immigrants to our nation's prominence and success is as timely as ever.

A Nation Of Immigrants

Author: John Kennedy
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781438192703
Size: 16.62 MB
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Throughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, deserving the freedo.

A Nation Of Immigrants Reconsidered

Author: Maddalena Marinari
Publisher: Studies of World Migrations
ISBN: 9780252042218
Size: 79.37 MB
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Scholars, journalists, and policymakers have long argued that the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act dramatically reshaped the demographic composition of the United States. In A Nation of Immigrants Reconsidered, leading scholars of immigration explore how the political and ideological struggles of the so-called "age of restriction"--from 1924 to 1965--paved the way for the changes to come. The essays examine how geopolitics, civil rights, perceptions of America's role as a humanitarian sanctuary, and economic priorities led government officials to facilitate the entrance of specific immigrant groups, thereby establishing the legal precedents for future policies. Eye-opening articles discuss Japanese war brides and changing views of miscegenation, the recruitment of former Nazi scientists, a temporary workers program with Japanese immigrants, the emotional separation of Mexican immigrant families, Puerto Rican youth's efforts to claim an American identity, and the restaurant raids of conscripted Chinese sailors during World War II. Contributors: Eiichiro Azuma, David Cook-Martín, David FitzGerald, Monique Laney, Heather Lee, Kathleen López, Laura Madokoro, Ronald L. Mize, Arissa H. Oh, Ana Elizabeth Rosas, Lorrin Thomas, Ruth Ellen Wasem, and Elliott Young.

They Came From Around The World

Author: Kathi Oram Peterson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781934393406
Size: 68.41 MB
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The clothing, crafts, recipes, household tools, and games of the early American settlers are showcased in these activities that teach children about the hardships and triumphs of starting over in a new land. Providing a combination of hands-on projects and engaging text, the book includes immigrant groups from many religious backgrounds and nations—including Greece, Israel, Japan, and Africa—in both the activities and the historical narrative, which is enlivened by little-known facts and biographical sketches. Accessible information on how to find additional online resources is also included.

A Nation Of Nations

Author: Tom Gjelten
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476743878
Size: 41.26 MB
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“An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity” (Kirkus Reviews) and the landmark immigration law that transformed the face of the nation more than fifty years ago, as told through the stories of immigrant families in one suburban county in Virginia. In the years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the foreign-born population of the United States has tripled. Americans today are vastly more diverse than ever. They look different, speak different languages, practice different religions, eat different foods, and enjoy different cultures. In 1950, Fairfax County, Virginia, was ninety percent white, ten percent African-American, with a little more than one hundred families who were “other.” Currently the Anglo white population is less than fifty percent, and there are families of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Latin American origin living all over the county. “In A Nation of Nations, National Public Radio correspondent Tom Gjelten brings these changes to life” (The Wall Street Journal), following a few immigrants to Fairfax County over recent decades as they gradually “Americanize.” Hailing from Korea, Bolivia, and Libya, the families included illustrate common immigrant themes: friction between minorities, economic competition and entrepreneurship, and racial and cultural stereotyping. It’s been half a century since the Immigration and Nationality Act changed the landscape of America, and no book has assessed the impact or importance of this law as A Nation of Nations. With these “powerful human stories…Gjelten has produced a compelling and informative account of the impact of the 1965 reforms, one that is indispensable reading at a time when anti-immigrant demagoguery has again found its way onto the main stage of political discourse” (The Washington Post).

A Nation Of Immigrants

Author: Lorijo Metz
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
ISBN: 1477731431
Size: 48.55 MB
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To an unusual extent, the United States is a nation of immigrants. Readers will encounter the waves of immigrants who made this land their home. Along with those who came seeking freedom and opportunity, the book also addresses the many slaves from Africa who became unwilling immigrants. Recent and present-day immigration are also emphasized. Historical and current photos, a map, and an illustrated timeline celebrate America’s rich immigrant heritage.