Our Affair With El Nino

Author: S. George Philander
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691126227
Size: 39.30 MB
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Until 1997, few people had heard of the seasonal current that Peruvians nicknamed El Ni�o. But when meteorologists linked it to devastating floods in California, severe droughts in Indonesia, and strange weather everywhere, its name became entrenched in the common parlance faster than a typhoon making landfall. Bumper stickers appeared bearing the phrase "Don't blame me; blame El Ni�o." Stockbrokers muttered "El Ni�o" when the market became erratic. What's behind this fascinating natural phenomenon, and how did our perceptions of it change? In this captivating book, renowned oceanographer George Philander engages readers in lucid and stimulating discussions of the scientific, political, economic and cultural developments that shaped our perceptions of this force of nature. The book begins by outlining the history of El Ni�o, an innocuous current that appears off the coast of Peru around Christmastime--its name refers to the Child Jesus--and originally was welcomed as a blessing. It goes on to explore how our perceptions of El Ni�o were transformed, not because the phenomenon changed, but because we did. Philander argues persuasively that familiarity with the different facets of our affair with El Ni�o--our wealth of experience in dealing with natural hazards such as severe storms and prolonged droughts--can help us cope with an urgent and controversial environmental problem of our own making--global warming. Intellectually invigorating and a joy to read, Our Affair with El Ni�o is an important contribution to the debate about the relationship between scientific knowledge and public affairs.

The Age Of Anxiety

Author: Andrea Tone
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0786727470
Size: 60.57 MB
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Anxious Americans have increasingly pursued peace of mind through pills and prescriptions. In 2006, the National Institute of Mental Health estimated that 40 million adult Americans suffer from an anxiety disorder in any given year: more than double the number thought to have such a disorder in 2001. Anti-anxiety drugs are a billion-dollar business. Yet as recently as 1955, when the first tranquilizer—Miltown—went on the market, pharmaceutical executives worried that there wouldn't be interest in anxiety-relief. At mid-century, talk therapy remained the treatment of choice. But Miltown became a sensation—the first psychotropic blockbuster in United States history. By 1957, Americans had filled 36 million prescriptions. Patients seeking made-to-order tranquility emptied drugstores, forcing pharmacists to post signs reading “more Miltown tomorrow.” The drug's financial success and cultural impact revolutionized perceptions of anxiety and its treatment, inspiring the development of other lifestyle drugs including Valium and Prozac. In The Age of Anxiety, Andrea Tone draws on a broad array of original sources—manufacturers' files, FDA reports, letters, government investigations, and interviews with inventors, physicians, patients, and activists—to provide the first comprehensive account of the rise of America's tranquilizer culture. She transports readers from the bomb shelters of the Cold War to the scientific optimism of the Baby Boomers, to the “just say no” Puritanism of the late 1970s and 1980s. A vibrant history of America's long and turbulent affair with tranquilizers, The Age of Anxiety casts new light on what it has meant to seek synthetic solutions to everyday angst.

Aphrodite S Daughters

Author: Maureen Honey
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813570808
Size: 19.33 MB
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The Harlem Renaissance was a watershed moment for racial uplift, poetic innovation, sexual liberation, and female empowerment. Aphrodite’s Daughters introduces us to three amazing women who were at the forefront of all these developments, poetic iconoclasts who pioneered new and candidly erotic forms of female self-expression. Maureen Honey paints a vivid portrait of three African American women—Angelina Weld Grimké, Gwendolyn B. Bennett, and Mae V. Cowdery—who came from very different backgrounds but converged in late 1920s Harlem to leave a major mark on the literary landscape. She examines the varied ways these poets articulated female sexual desire, ranging from Grimké’s invocation of a Sapphic goddess figure to Cowdery’s frank depiction of bisexual erotics to Bennett’s risky exploration of the borders between sexual pleasure and pain. Yet Honey also considers how they were united in their commitment to the female body as a primary source of meaning, strength, and transcendence. The product of extensive archival research, Aphrodite’s Daughters draws from Grimké, Bennett, and Cowdery’s published and unpublished poetry, along with rare periodicals and biographical materials, to immerse us in the lives of these remarkable women and the world in which they lived. It thus not only shows us how their artistic contributions and cultural interventions were vital to their own era, but also demonstrates how the poetic heart of their work keeps on beating.

Introduction To The Voluntary Sector

Author: Rodney Hedley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134858108
Size: 77.33 MB
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In the 1990s the voluntary and charity sector is being forced to become an increasingly important provider of health and social welfare in Britain. How can it respond to this pressure, who is running it and how should it be managed? As well as offering a full overview of the voluntary sector the editors and contributors: examine its history and importance within welfare provision explore its current position and responsibilities offer practical guidance for and analysis of the issues facing the voluntary sector today including its legal framework in the UK and EU, fundraising management and accountability. An Introduction to the Voluntary Sector will be invaluable reading to all students and lecturers of social policy and organisational studies as well as to professional policy-makers and voluntary sector personnel.

The Reception Of Cicero In The Early Roman Empire

Author: Thomas J. Keeline
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108426239
Size: 79.91 MB
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Explores the crucial role played by rhetorical education in turning Cicero into a literary and political symbol after his death.

The Essential Canon Of Classical Music

Author: David Dubal
Publisher: North Point Press
ISBN: 1466807261
Size: 24.19 MB
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The ultimate guide to classical composers and their music-for both the novice and the experienced listener Music, according to Aaron Copland, can thrive only if there are "gifted listeners." But today's listeners must choose between classical and rock, opera and rap, and the choices can seem overwhelming at times. In The Essential Canon of Classical Music, David Dubal comes to the aid of the struggling listener and provides a cultural-literacy handbook for classical music. Dubal identifies the 240 composers whose works are most important to an understanding of classical music and offers a comprehensive, chronological guide to their lives and works. He has searched beyond the traditional canon to introduce readers to little-known works by some of the most revered names in classical music-Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Schubert-as well as to the major works of lesser-known composers. In a spirited and opinionated voice, Dubal seeks to rid us of the notion of "masterpieces" and instead to foster a new generation of master listeners. The result is an uncommon collection of the wonders classical music has to offer.

The Only Thing That Matters

Author: Kim Jensen
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 0815650531
Size: 24.82 MB
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"The Only Thing That Matters" is a collection of poems that engage with and expound upon the work of poet Fanny Howe. Through a specific process designed by the author, Jensen combines Howe’s words and her own to create entirely new poems that challenge our understanding of postmodernist work. The author builds on Howe’s wide-ranging themes of intimacy, spirituality, and political agency. Her poems pay homage to a celebrated poet, while simultaneously conveying a belief in open-mindedness and the possibility for love.

Poets In Their Youth

Author: Eileen Simpson
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0374713006
Size: 24.30 MB
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In 1942, Eileen Simpson—then Eileen Mulligan—married John Berryman. Both were in their twenties; Eileen had just graduated from Hunter College and John had but one slim volume of poetry to his name. They moved frequently—from New York to Boston, then Princeton—chasing jobs, living simply, relying on the hospitality of more successful friends like Robert Lowell and Jean Stafford, or R. P. Blackmur and his wife, Helen. Rounding out their circle of intimates were other struggling poets like Randall Jarrell and Delmore Schwartz. Berryman alternately wrote and despaired of writing. Everyone stayed up late arguing about poetry. Poets in Their Youth is a portrait of their marriage, yes, but it is also a portrait of a group of spectacularly intelligent friends at a particular time, in a particular place, all aflame with literature. Simpson's recollections are so tender, her narrative so generous, it is almost possible to imagine the story has a different ending—even as Schwartz's marriage crumbles, as Lowell succumbs to a manic episode, as her own relationship with Berryman buckles under the strain of his drinking, his infidelity, his depression. Filled with winning anecdotes and moments of startling poignancy, Simpson's now classic memoir shows some of the most brilliant literary minds of the second half of the twentieth century at their brightest and most achingly human.

Listening To Whales

Author: Alexandra Morton
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 9780307487544
Size: 25.82 MB
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In Listening to Whales, Alexandra Morton shares spellbinding stories about her career in whale and dolphin research and what she has learned from and about these magnificent mammals. In the late 1970s, while working at Marineland in California, Alexandra pioneered the recording of orca sounds by dropping a hydrophone into the tank of two killer whales. She recorded the varied language of mating, childbirth, and even grief after the birth of a stillborn calf. At the same time she made the startling observation that the whales were inventing wonderful synchronized movements, a behavior that was soon recognized as a defining characteristic of orca society. In 1984, Alexandra moved to a remote bay in British Columbia to continue her research with wild orcas. Her recordings of the whales have led her to a deeper understanding of the mystery of whale echolocation, the vocal communication that enables the mammals to find their way in the dark sea. A fascinating study of the profound communion between humans and whales, this book will open your eyes anew to the wonders of the natural world. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Book Of Judges

Author: Barry G. Webb
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802826288
Size: 18.53 MB
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The book discusses not only unique features of the stories themselves but also such issues as the violent nature of Judges, how women are portrayed in it, and how it relates to the Christian gospel of the New Testament. --from publisher description.