Adventures in the Afterlife

Adventures in the Afterlife

Adventures in the Afterlife is a powerful journey of spiritual awakening; a bold quest for answers and enlightenment. The old assumptions of heaven are confronted and an expansive new vision of our continuing life is presented. After being diagnosed with cancer, William Buhlman, author of Adventures Beyond the Body, pursued answers to the mysteries of our existence after death. Confronting his mortality, he experienced profound insights into what lies beyond our physical body. Our journey into the next life is the basis for Adventures in the Afterlife. The author chronicles his out-of-bodyexperiences and lucid dreams through the eyesof a fictional character, Frank Brooks. The insights are sometimes surprising, but a clear message is always apparent; we are powerful, spiritual beings and we shape our reality now and in the future. The purpose of this book is to prepare us for the many thought responsive environments we will experience. William Buhlman teaches and lectures worldwide on the subjects of out-of-body experiences and spiritual empowerment. Visit the author at www.astralinfo.org.

Six Feet Over

Adventures in the Afterlife

Six Feet Over

Does the light just go out and that’s that – the million-year nap? Or will some part of my personality, my me-ness, persist? What will that feel like? What will I do all day? Is there a place to plug in my laptop?” Mary Roach trains her considerable humour and curiosity on the human soul, seeking answers from a varied and fascinating crew of contemporary and historical soul-searchers: scientists, schemers, engineers, mediums, all trying to prove (or disprove) that life goes on after we die. Along the way she encounters electromagnetic hauntings, out-of-body experiences, ghosts and lawsuits: Mary Roach sifts and weighs the evidence in her hilarious, inimitable style.

Jim Morrison's Adventures in the Afterlife

A Novel

Jim Morrison's Adventures in the Afterlife

Part devil, part angel, the specter of Jim Morrison has haunted America's consciousness since his premature death in 1971. His spirit seemed dark, and the graphic despair of his Lizard King persona reigned supreme in his lifetime, but Jim Morrison died with a smile on his face. Was his journey through the afterlife as tumultuous as his journey through life? This is the question Mick Farren answers in his fascinatingly complex novel based on one of the twentieth century's most enigmatic figures. Jim Morrison's Adventures in the Afterlife picks up the story of Morrison as he hurtles through a purgatory-like afterlife in search of some way to bring his soul to peace. Along the way he finds Doc Holliday--and together they find themselves chasing the restless fire-and-brimstone evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, whose soul has broken after death into two warring halves. McPherson's sexier half becomes the object of Jim's obsession, and as the two struggle to find each other in this disordered land, their wild, careening chase through a dozen dystopiae recalls imagined worlds as diverse as Burgess's A Clockwork Orange or Terry Gilliam's Brazil. This is a daring, hilarious romp through the landfill of millennial society. Possessed of an imagination that rivals that of any of our edgiest fantasists, steeped in the detritus and ephemera of three decades of pop culture, Mick Farren has crafted in this new novel a bizarre and compelling fantasia.

Ghosthunter

Adventures in the Afterlife

Ghosthunter

Tom Robertson has spent a lifetime hunting for ghosts. His quest to uncover the supernatural started at the tender age of seven with his first terrifying encounter with the Black Lady of Larkhall. It was a day he would never forget. Since then, Tom has embarked on countless investigations of the weird, the freakish and the unexplained. In some cases he has uncovered perfectly rational explanations -others remain a mystery to this day. Ghosthunter is the astonishing story of Tom Robertson's most challenging cases, including his encounters with the Black Lady, the Maid of the Glen, the Big Grey Man of Ben MacDhui and a castle-dwelling vampire with an unimaginable connection to the legendary Prince of Pop, Michael Jackson. These fascinating tales will stretch the imagination but they all happened to ghosthunter Tom Robertson.

Encountering Heaven and the Afterlife

True Stories From People Who Have Glimpsed the World Beyond

Encountering Heaven and the Afterlife

What happens when we die? What is heaven really like? How do spiritual beings--angels and demons--interact with us here and in the hereafter? Real-life, credible stories of near-death experiences and spiritual encounters gathered by the authors of Heaven and the Afterlife paint a clearer, fuller picture of exactly what readers can expect when it's their turn to "cross over." These gripping true stories--written from a solidly biblical perspective but accessible to seekers--provide fascinating glimpses into the spiritual world around us and the one that awaits us.

The Myth of an Afterlife

The Case against Life After Death

The Myth of an Afterlife

Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of scientific evidence strongly suggest otherwise. In The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life after Death, Michael Martin and Keith Augustine collect a series of contributions that redress this imbalance in the literature by providing a strong, comprehensive, and up-to-date casebook of the chief arguments against an afterlife. Divided into four separate sections, this collection opens with a broad overview of the issues, as contributors consider the strongest evidence of whether or not we survive death—in particular the biological basis of all mental states and their grounding in brain activity that ceases to function at death. Next, contributors consider a host of conceptual and empirical difficulties that confront the various ways of “surviving” death—from bodiless minds to bodily resurrection to any form of posthumous survival. Then essayists turn to internal inconsistencies between traditional theological conceptions of an afterlife—heaven, hell, karmic rebirth—and widely held ethical principles central to the belief systems supporting those notions. In the final section, authors offer critical evaluations of the main types of evidence for an afterlife. Fully interdisciplinary, The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life after Death brings together a variety of fields of research to make that case, including cognitive neuroscience, philosophy of mind, personal identity, philosophy of religion, moral philosophy, psychical research, and anomalistic psychology. As the definitive casebook of arguments against life after death, this collection is required reading for any instructor, researcher, and student of philosophy, religious studies, or theology. It is sure to raise provocative issues new to readers, regardless of background, from those who believe fervently in the reality of an afterlife to those who do not or are undecided on the matter.

American Comics, Literary Theory, and Religion

The Superhero Afterlife

American Comics, Literary Theory, and Religion

Unlocking a new and overdue model for reading comic books, this unique volume explores religious interpretations of popular comic book superheroes such as the Green Lantern and the Hulk. This superhero subgenre offers a hermeneutic for those interested in integrating mutiplicity into religious practices and considerations of the afterlife.

The Zodiac of Paris

How an Improbable Controversy Over an Ancient Egyptian Artifact Provoked a Modern Debate Between Religion and Science

The Zodiac of Paris

The Dendera zodiac--an ancient bas-relief temple ceiling adorned with mysterious symbols of the stars and planets--was first discovered by the French during Napoleon's campaign in Egypt, and quickly provoked a controversy between scientists and theologians. Brought to Paris in 1821 and ultimately installed in the Louvre, where it can still be seen today, the zodiac appeared to depict the nighttime sky from a time predating the Biblical creation, and therefore cast doubt on religious truth. The Zodiac of Paris tells the story of this incredible archeological find and its unlikely role in the fierce disputes over science and faith in Napoleonic and Restoration France. The book unfolds against the turbulence of the French Revolution, Napoleon's breathtaking rise and fall, and the restoration of the Bourbons to the throne. Drawing on newspapers, journals, diaries, pamphlets, and other documentary evidence, Jed Buchwald and Diane Greco Josefowicz show how scientists and intellectuals seized upon the zodiac to discredit Christianity, and how this drew furious responses from conservatives and sparked debates about the merits of scientific calculation as a source of knowledge about the past. The ideological battles would rage until the thoroughly antireligious Jean-François Champollion unlocked the secrets of Egyptian hieroglyphs--and of the zodiac itself. Champollion would prove the religious reactionaries right, but for all the wrong reasons. The Zodiac of Paris brings Napoleonic and Restoration France vividly to life, revealing the lengths to which scientists, intellectuals, theologians, and conservatives went to use the ancient past for modern purposes.

Adventures in Criminal Justice Research

Data Analysis Using SPSS 15.0 and 16.0 for Windows

Adventures in Criminal Justice Research

The only book of its kind, this text guides students through the process of conducting criminological data analysis. Used primarily in lab settings, the Fourth Edition of Adventures in Criminal Justice Research, derived from the popular Adventures in Social Research (Babbie et al, Pine Forge Press/SAGE), systematically takes students through a series of investigative adventures. More than 150 screenshots in the text offer clear visual step-by-step instructions to solidify student understanding. New to This Edition Incorporates even more criminal justice exercises, policy-related exercises, and hot criminal justice–related issues throughout the book Includes analysis of criminal justice and other social issues using data from GSS sets, the 2000 Census, the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Survey, and other data sets available to the public through the Internet Offers increased coverage of Web-based surveys and survey software Accompanied by High-Quality Ancillaries! A new Student study site at www.sagepub.com/logiostudy features numerous data sets along with online appendices - Appendix A: Sample Journal Article and "How to Read a Research Article", Appendix B: College Alcohol Study Questionnaire, and Appendix C: Chapter Review Quizzes with Answers. Intended Audience This practical textbook is a valuable supplement for courses in Research Methods and/or Statistics in departments of criminal justice or criminology. The only book of its kind, this text guides students through the process of conducting criminological data analysis. Used primarily in lab settings, the of , derived from the popular (Babbie et al, Pine Forge Press/SAGE), systematically takes students through a series of investigative adventures.

Afterlife and Narrative in Contemporary Fiction

Afterlife and Narrative in Contemporary Fiction

Afterlife and Narrative explores why life after death is such a potent cultural concept today, and why it is such an attractive prospect for modern fiction. The book mines a rich vein of imagined afterlives, from the temporal experiments of Martin Amis's Time's Arrow to narration from heaven in Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones .