After Love

Queer Intimacy and Erotic Economies in Post-Soviet Cuba

After Love

Focused on the intimate effects of large-scale economic transformations, After Love illuminates the ways that everyday efforts to imagine, resist, and enact market reforms shape sexual desires and subjectivities. Anthropologist Noelle M. Stout arrived in Havana in 2002 to study the widely publicized emergence of gay tolerance in Cuba but discovered that the sex trade was dominating everyday discussions among gays, lesbians, and travestis. Largely eradicated after the Revolution, sex work, including same-sex prostitution, exploded in Havana when the island was opened to foreign tourism in the early 1990s. The booming sex trade led to unprecedented encounters between Cuban gays and lesbians, and straight male sex workers and foreign tourists. As many gay Cuban men in their thirties and forties abandoned relationships with other gay men in favor of intimacies with straight male sex workers, these bonds complicated ideas about "true love" for queer Cubans at large. From openly homophobic hustlers having sex with urban gays for room and board, to lesbians disparaging sex workers but initiating relationships with foreign men for money, to gay tourists espousing communist rhetoric while handing out Calvin Klein bikini briefs, the shifting economic terrain raised fundamental questions about the boundaries between labor and love in late-socialist Cuba.

Dispossessed

How Predatory Bureaucracy Foreclosed on the American Middle Class

Dispossessed

In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, more than 14 million U.S. homeowners filed for foreclosure. Focusing on the hard-hit Sacramento Valley, Noelle Stout uncovers the predacious bureaucracy that organized the largest bank seizure of residential homes in U.S. history. Stout reveals the failure of Wall Street banks’ mortgage assistance programs—backed by over $300 billion of federal funds—to deliver on the promise of relief. Unlike the programs of the Great Depression, in which the government took on the toxic mortgage debt of Americans, corporate lenders and loan servicers ultimately denied over 70 percent of homeowner applications. In the voices of bank employees and homeowners, Stout unveils how call center representatives felt about denying appeals and shares the fears of families living on the brink of eviction. Stout discloses the impacts of rising inequality on homeowners—from whites who felt their middle-class life unraveling to communities of color who experienced a more precipitous and dire decline. Trapped in a Kafkaesque maze of mortgage assistance, borrowers began to view debt refusal as a moral response to lenders, as seemingly mundane bureaucratic dramas came to redefine the meaning of debt and dispossession.

Ethno-erotic Economies

Sexuality, Money, and Belonging in Kenya

Ethno-erotic Economies

In Ethno-Erotic Economies, anthropologist George Paul Meiu looks at how fantasies of sexual difference create what we think of as "ethnicity" in a globalized world. Meiu draws back the curtain on a fascinating case of sexual tourism in Coastal Kenya in which young men deploy stereotypes of African warriors to establish transactional sexual relationships with foreign women. Meiu's deep familiarity with Samburu culture allowed him to explore the long-term effects of the sex trade on things like intimate affiliations, kinship, ritual, gender, and age in rural Kenya. What happens to communities when wealth becomes concentrated in the hands of its young men? How do these men seek to convert fast money into traditional, lasting forms of prestige to become "elders" and thus secure higher moral and social standing? And, crucially, how do others not privy to the sexual encounters themselves understand the circulation of new money? Meiu's exceptional skills as an ethnographer yield riveting testimonies from all quarters of Samburu society, resulting in a compelling look at how intimacy and ethnicity come together to shape the pathways of global and local trade in the postcolonial world.

Queer Families in Hungary

Same-Sex Couples, Families of Origin, and Kinship

Queer Families in Hungary

Set against the backdrop of a country which upholds a heteronormative and narrow view of family, this book provides insights into the lives of Hungarian same-sex couples and their heterosexual relatives. Béres-Deák utilizes the theoretical framework of intimate citizenship, as well as findings from ethnographic interviews, participant observation and online sources. Instead of emphasizing the divide between non-heterosexual people and their heterosexual kin, the author recognizes that these members of queer families share many similar experiences and challenges.Queer Families in Hungary looks at experiences of coming out, negotiation of visibility, and kinship practices, and offers valuable insights into how individuals and families can resist heterosexist constraints through their discourses and practices. Students and scholars researching kinship studies, LGBT and queer studies, post-socialist studies, and citizenship studies, will find this book of interest.

Kinship, Love, and Life Cycle in Contemporary Havana, Cuba

To Not Die Alone

Kinship, Love, and Life Cycle in Contemporary Havana, Cuba

Kinship, Love, and Life Cycle in Contemporary Havana, Cuba is an ethnographic analysis of gender, kinship, and love in contemporary Cuba. The book documents how low-income Havana residents negotiate their social relations through gendered caring practices over the life cycle from birth to death.

Qed, a Journal in Glbtq Worldmaking

Qed, a Journal in Glbtq Worldmaking

IN THIS ISSUE Essays Nishant Shahani, "How to Survive the Whitewashing of AIDS: Global Pasts, Transnational Futures" Valerie Palmer-Mehta, "Subversive Maternities: Staceyann Chin's Contemplative Voice" Leland G. Spencer, John Lynch, "Possibilities for Inclusive Family and Community in Beth Stroud's 'Walking in the Light'" Courtney Bailey, "Confession and Catharsis in the U.S. Academy: Trigger Warnings, Coalitions, and Academic Audiences" Queer Conversation Bryan J. McCann, "Holding Each Other Better: Discussing State Violence, Healing, and Community with BreakOUT!" Forum Peter Odell Campbell, "Hobby Lobby's Queer Antecedents (A Tale of Two RFRAs)" Amy L. Livingston, Anna Kurhajec, "Organizing Priorities: The Problem with ENDA and Burwell" Lisa M. Corrigan, "So, You've Heard of the Duggars? Bodily Autonomy, Religious Exemption, and the American South" Alyssa A. Samek, "The Fourth Demand" Book Reviews C. Riley Snorton, Nobody's Supposed to Know: Black Sexuality on the Down Low, reviewed by Charles I. Nero Noelle M. Stout, After Love: Queer Intimacy and Erotic Economies in Post-Soviet Cuba, reviewed by Lisa M. Corrigan Erin J. Rand, Reclaiming Queer: Activist and Academic Rhetorics of Resistance, reviewed by Kendall Gerdes Meredith L. Weiss and Michael J. Bosia, eds., Global Homophobia: States, Movements, and the Politics of Oppression, reviewed by Joe Hatfield Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr., Sexual Discretion: Black Masculinity and the Politics of Passing, reviewed by Cherod Johnson Adelina Anthony, Las Hociconas: Three Locas with Big Mouths and Even Bigger Brains, reviewed by Ruby Kim Larissa M. Mercado-López, Sonia Saldívar-Hull, and Antonia Castañeda, eds., El Mundo Zurdo 3: Selected Works from the 2012 Meeting of the Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa, reviewed by Irene Alejandra Ramírez and Adela C. Licona