American Colonies

Author: Alan Taylor
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101075814
Size: 28.47 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1196
Download
A multicultural, multinational history of colonial America from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Internal Enemy and American Revolutions In the first volume in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner, Alan Taylor challenges the traditional story of colonial history by examining the many cultures that helped make America, from the native inhabitants from milennia past, through the decades of Western colonization and conquest, and across the entire continent, all the way to the Pacific coast. Transcending the usual Anglocentric version of our colonial past, he recovers the importance of Native American tribes, African slaves, and the rival empires of France, Spain, the Netherlands, and even Russia in the colonization of North America. Moving beyond the Atlantic seaboard to examine the entire continent, American Colonies reveals a pivotal period in the global interaction of peoples, cultures, plants, animals, and microbes. In a vivid narrative, Taylor draws upon cutting-edge scholarship to create a timely picture of the colonial world characterized by an interplay of freedom and slavery, opportunity and loss. "Formidable . . . provokes us to contemplate the ways in which residents of North America have dealt with diversity." -The New York Times Book Review From the Trade Paperback edition.

American Colonies

Author: Alan Taylor
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780142002100
Size: 24.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2630
Download
An acclaimed historian challenges the traditional Anglocentric focus of colonial history by examining the various cultural influences from which "America" emerged and documenting the intricate ecological, ethnic, and economic history of the New World, from the Canadian north to the Pacific rim. Reprint.

El Norte

Author: Carrie Gibson
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
ISBN: 080214635X
Size: 60.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 7064
Download
Because of our shared English language, as well as the celebrated origin tales of the Mayflower and the rebellion of the British colonies, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, the nation has much older Spanish roots—ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the United States predates the arrival of the Pilgrims by a century, and has been every bit as important in shaping the nation as it exists today. El Norte chronicles the sweeping and dramatic history of Hispanic North America from the arrival of the Spanish in the early 16th century to the present—from Ponce de Leon’s initial landing in Florida in 1513 to Spanish control of the vast Louisiana territory in 1762 to the Mexican-American War in 1846 and up to the more recent tragedy of post-hurricane Puerto Rico and the ongoing border acrimony with Mexico. Interwoven in this stirring narrative of events and people are cultural issues that have been there from the start but which are unresolved to this day: language, belonging, community, race, and nationality. Seeing them play out over centuries provides vital perspective at a time when it is urgently needed. In 1883, Walt Whitman meditated on his country’s Spanish past: “We Americans have yet to really learn our own antecedents, and sort them, to unify them,” predicting that “to that composite American identity of the future, Spanish character will supply some of the most needed parts.” That future is here, and El Norte, a stirring and eventful history in its own right, will make a powerful impact on our national understanding.

Between Two Worlds

Author: Malcolm Gaskill
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191653837
Size: 43.78 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6408
Download
Between Two Worlds is a story teeming with people on the move, making decisions, indulging or resisting their desires and dreams. In the seventeenth century a quarter of a million men, women, and children left England's shores for America. Some were explorers and merchants, others soldiers and missionaries; many were fugitives from poverty and persecution. All, in their own way, were adventurers, risking their lives and fortunes to make something of themselves overseas. They irrevocably changed the land and indigenous peoples they encountered - and their new world changed them. But that was only half the story. The plantations established from Maine to the Caribbean needed support at home, especially royal endorsement and money, which made adventurers of English monarchs and investors too. Attitudes to America were crucial, and evolved as the colonies grew in size, prosperity, and self-confidence. Meanwhile, for those who had crossed the ocean, America forced people to rethink the country in which they had been raised, and to which they remained attached after emigration. In tandem with new ideas about the New World, migrants pondered their English mother country's traditions and achievements, its problems and its uncertain future in an age of war and revolution. Using hundreds of letters, journals, reports, pamphlets and contemporary books, Between Two Worlds recreates this fascinating transatlantic history - one which has often been neglected or misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic in the centuries since.

Colonial America

Author: Alan Taylor
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199766231
Size: 16.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5532
Download
In this Very Short Introduction, Alan Taylor presents the current scholarly understanding of colonial America to a broader audience. He focuses on the transatlantic and a transcontinental perspective, examining the interplay of Europe, Africa, and the Americas through the flows of goods, people, plants, animals, capital, and ideas.

Cengage Advantage Books Making America Volume 1 To 1877

Author: Carol Berkin
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133709915
Size: 74.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1326
Download
Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this economically priced version of MAKING AMERICA, Sixth Edition offers readers the complete narrative while limiting the number of features, photos, and maps. All volumes feature a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history text. Shaped with a clear political chronology, MAKING AMERICA reflects the variety of individual experiences and cultures that comprise American society. MAKING AMERICA provides a clear, helpful text that meets students where they are. For instructors whose classrooms mirror the diversity of today's college students, the strongly chronological narrative, together with an integrated program of learning and teaching aids, makes the historical content vivid and comprehensible to students at all levels of preparedness. Available in the following options: CENGAGE ADVANTAGE BOOKS: MAKING AMERICA, Sixth Edition (Chapters 1-29); Volume 1: To 1877 (Chapters 1-15); Volume 2: Since 1865 (Chapters 15-29). Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Divided Ground

Author: Alan Taylor
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307428427
Size: 53.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3103
Download
From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of William Cooper's Town comes a dramatic and illuminating portrait of white and Native American relations in the aftermath of the American Revolution. The Divided Ground tells the story of two friends, a Mohawk Indian and the son of a colonial clergyman, whose relationship helped redefine North America. As one served American expansion by promoting Indian dispossession and religious conversion, and the other struggled to defend and strengthen Indian territories, the two friends became bitter enemies. Their battle over control of the Indian borderland, that divided ground between the British Empire and the nascent United States, would come to define nationhood in North America. Taylor tells a fascinating story of the far-reaching effects of the American Revolution and the struggle of American Indians to preserve a land of their own. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Bunker Hill

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101622709
Size: 59.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4135
Download
The bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Valiant Ambition, and In the Hurricane's Eye tells the story of the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution, in this "masterpiece of narrative and perspective." (Boston Globe) Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord. In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists. Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control. With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.

The Cambridge Economic History Of The United States

Author: John H Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History Stanley L Engerman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521394420
Size: 70.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3978
Download
Surveys the economic history of British North America and the early United States to the end of the 18th cenutry

The Enduring Vision A History Of The American People Volume 1 To 1877 Concise

Author: Paul Boyer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0547222815
Size: 16.15 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3166
Download
Like its corresponding full-size version, THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE, is an engaging, elegantly written narrative that emphasizes political, social, and cultural history within a chronological framework. THE ENDURING VISION is known for sustained attention to cultural history, and for innovative coverage of the environment, and the West. The Sixth Edition of THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE, features a new co-author, Andrew Rieser, new pedagogy, and a beautiful new design. Available in the following split options: THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE Sixth Edition Complete (Chapters 1-32), ISBN: 0547222807; Volume A: To 1877 (Chapters 1-16), ISBN: 0547222815; Volume B: Since 1865 (Chapters 16-32), ISBN: 0547222785. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.