Becoming Legal

Author: Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780190276010
Size: 77.28 MB
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"An ethnographic study of immigration and mixed-status families"--

Border Brokers

Author: Christina Getrich
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816538999
Size: 27.19 MB
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Some 16.6 million people nationwide live in mixed-status families, containing a combination of U.S. citizens, residents, and undocumented immigrants. U.S. immigration governance has become an almost daily news headline. Yet even in the absence of federal immigration reform over the last twenty years, existing policies and practices have already been profoundly impacting these family units. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in San Diego over more than a decade, Border Brokers documents the continuing deleterious effects of U.S. immigration policies and enforcement practices on a group of now young adults and their families. In the first book-length longitudinal study of mixed-status families, Christina M. Getrich provides an on-the-ground portrayal of these young adults’ lives from their own perspectives and in their own words. More importantly, Getrich identifies how these individuals have developed resiliency and agency beginning in their teens to improve circumstances for immigrant communities. Despite the significant constraints their families face, these children have emerged into adulthood as grounded and skilled brokers who effectively use their local knowledge bases, life skills honed in their families, and transborder competencies. Refuting the notion of their failure to assimilate, she highlights the mature, engaged citizenship they model as they transition to adulthood to be perhaps their most enduring contribution to creating a better U.S. society. An accessible ethnography rooted in the everyday, this book portrays the complexity of life in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. It offers important insights for anthropologists, educators, policy-makers, and activists working on immigration and social justice issues.

Immigration And The Law

Author: Sofía Espinoza Álvarez
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816537623
Size: 69.52 MB
Format: PDF
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A critical look at the mechanisms, beliefs, and ideologies that govern U.S. immigration laws, and the social impacts of their enforcement--Provided by publisher.

The U S Mexico Transborder Region

Author: Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816535159
Size: 29.35 MB
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"One of the most complete collections of essays on U.S.-Mexico border studies"--Provided by publisher.

Separated

Author: William D. Lopez
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
ISBN: 1421433311
Size: 34.16 MB
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Putting faces and names to the numbers behind deportation statistics, Separated urges readers to move beyond sound bites and consider the human experience of mixed-status communities in the small everyday towns that dot the interior of the United States.

Family Activism

Author: Amalia Pallares
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813564581
Size: 37.83 MB
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During the past ten years, legal and political changes in the United States have dramatically altered the legalization process for millions of undocumented immigrants and their families. Faced with fewer legalization options, immigrants without legal status and their supporters have organized around the concept of the family as a political subject—a political subject with its rights violated by immigration laws. Drawing upon the idea of the “impossible activism” of undocumented immigrants, Amalia Pallares argues that those without legal status defy this “impossible” context by relying on the politicization of the family to challenge justice within contemporary immigration law. The culmination of a seven-year-long ethnography of undocumented immigrants and their families in Chicago, as well as national immigrant politics,Family Activism examines the three ways in which the family has become politically significant: as a political subject, as a frame for immigrant rights activism, and as a symbol of racial subordination and resistance. By analyzing grassroots campaigns, churches and interfaith coalitions, immigrant rights movements, and immigration legislation, Pallares challenges the traditional familial idea, ultimately reframing the family as a site of political struggle and as a basis for mobilization in immigrant communities.

U S Immigration And Education

Author: Elena L. Grigorenko, PhD
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826111084
Size: 38.13 MB
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This handbook helps readers to both understand and craft policies to aid the successful acculturation of immigrants in the US. It is an excellent road map for researchers in immigration and education, as well as educational and developmental psychologists, sociologists, economists, and public policy makers. An immigrant from Russia, Dr. Grigorenko weaves her first-hand experiences and strategies into this unique text. It encompasses all available research on immigration and acculturation, from new information on bilingual education to studies of low-skill versus high-skill workers. Key Topics: Immigration and America: current snapshot of US immigration policy and a demographic profile Immigration and education: Pre-K though grade12, higher, and adult education, and the labor market Immigration and incorporation into society: Implications for human development, health, and policy

National Insecurities

Author: Deirdre M. Moloney
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882615
Size: 32.78 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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For over a century, deportation and exclusion have defined eligibility for citizenship in the United States and, in turn, have shaped what it means to be American. In this broad analysis of policy from 1882 to present, Deirdre Moloney places current debates about immigration issues in historical context. Focusing on several ethnic groups, Moloney closely examines how gender and race led to differences in the implementation of U.S. immigration policy as well as how poverty, sexuality, health, and ideologies were regulated at the borders. Emphasizing the perspectives of immigrants and their advocates, Moloney weaves in details from case files that illustrate the impact policy decisions had on individual lives. She explores the role of immigration policy in diplomatic relations between the U.S. and other nations, and shows how federal, state, and local agencies had often conflicting priorities and approaches to immigration control. Throughout, Moloney traces the ways that these policy debates contributed to a modern understanding of citizenship and human rights in the twentieth century and even today.