Black Boy

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1446468380
Size: 69.29 MB
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Richard Wright's memoir of his childhood as a young black boy in the American south of the 1920s and 30s is a stark depiction of African American life and powerful exploration of racial tension. At four years old, Richard Wright set fire to his home in a moment of boredom; at five his father deserted the family; by six Richard was - temporarily - an alcoholic. Moved from home to home, from brick tenement to orphanage, a grandmother in Jackson, an aunt in Arkansas, he had had, by the age of twelve, only one year's formal education. It was in saloons, railroad yards and streets that he learned the facts about life under white subjection, about fear, hunger and hatred, while his mother's long illness taught him about suffering. The same alertness and independence that made him the 'bad boy' of his family and the victim of endless beatings also lost him numerous jobs. Gradually he learned to play Jim Crow in order to survive in a world of white hostility, secretly satisfying his craving for books and knowledge until the time came when he could follow his dream of justice and opportunity in the north.

Native Son

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 29.40 MB
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Briefly Noted Black Boy

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 38.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The author relates his life as an African American growing up in the South during the Jim Crow years.

Richard Wright S Black Boy

Author: Harold Bloom
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 0791085856
Size: 58.13 MB
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A critical overview of the work features the contributions of Dan McCall, Claudia C. Tate, Charles T. Davis, Yoshinobu Hakutani, Elizabeth J. Ciner, and other scholars, discussing the themes and characters of the novel.

Richard Wright S Black Boy American Hunger

Author: William L. Andrews
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195157729
Size: 52.52 MB
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This casebook reprints a selection of important and representative reviews, criticism and scholarly analysis of Richard Wright's 'Black Boy (American Hunger): A Record of Childhood and Youth' (1991).

Black Boy

Author: Facts On File, Incorporated
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438130422
Size: 28.23 MB
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Discusses the writing of Black boy by Richard Wright. Includes critical essays on the work and a brief biography of the author.

Richard Wright

Author: Keneth Kinnamon
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476609128
Size: 12.49 MB
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African-American writer Richard Wright (1908–1960) was celebrated during the early 1940s for his searing autobiography (Black Boy) and fiction (Native Son). By 1947 he felt so unwelcome in his homeland that he exiled himself and his family in Paris. But his writings changed American culture forever, and today they are mainstays of literature and composition classes. He and his works are also the subjects of numerous critical essays and commentaries by contemporary writers. This volume presents a comprehensive annotated bibliography of those essays, books, and articles from 1983 through 2003. Arranged alphabetically by author within years are some 8,320 entries ranging from unpublished dissertations to book-length studies of African American literature and literary criticism. Also included as an appendix are addenda to the author’s earlier bibliography covering the years from 1934 through 1982. This is the exhaustive reference for serious students of Richard Wright and his critics.

Kierkegaard S Influence On Social Political Thought

Author: Jon Bartley Stewart
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781409434917
Size: 50.53 MB
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Kierkegaard has been traditionally characterized as a Christian writer who placed supreme importance on the inward religious life of each individual believer. His radical view seemed to many to undermine any meaningful conception of the community, society or the state. In recent years, however, scholars have begun to correct this image of Kierkegaard as an apolitical thinker. The present volume attempts to document the use of Kierkegaard by later thinkers in the context of social-political thought. It shows how his ideas have been employed by very different kinds of writers and activists with very different political goals and agendas. Many of the articles show that, although Kierkegaard has been criticized for his reactionary views on some social and political questions, he has been appropriated as a source of insight and inspiration by a number of later thinkers with very progressive, indeed, visionary political views.

Building Academic Literacy

Author: Audrey Fielding
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0787965553
Size: 67.83 MB
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Building Academic Literacy: An Anthology for Reading Apprenticeship is a volume for middle and high school students addressing the topic of literacy and the important role it plays in our lives. Featuring lively and provocative essays, journalistic writings, and poetry as well as inspiring personal stories, the anthology offers a broad range of cultural and historical perspectives on the following themes: Literacy and Identity: The different ways people see themselves as readers. Literacy and Power: How reading and writing can open doors in our lives. How We Read: The different ways our minds work as we try to understand what we read. Breaking Codes: Our need to navigate unfamiliar types of texts.

Black Newspapers And America S War For Democracy 1914 1920

Author: William G. Jordan
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080787552X
Size: 63.11 MB
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During World War I, the publishers of America's crusading black newspapers faced a difficult dilemma. Would it be better to advance the interests of African Americans by affirming their patriotism and offering support of President Wilson's war for democracy in Europe, or should they demand that the government take concrete steps to stop the lynching, segregation, and disfranchisement of blacks at home as a condition of their participation in the war? This study of their efforts to resolve that dilemma offers important insights into the nature of black protest, race relations, and the role of the press in a republican system. William Jordan shows that before, during, and after the war, the black press engaged in a delicate and dangerous dance with the federal government and white America--at times making demands or holding firm, sometimes pledging loyalty, occasionally giving in. But although others have argued that the black press compromised too much, Jordan demonstrates that, given the circumstances, its strategic combination of protest and accommodation was remarkably effective. While resisting persistent threats of censorship, the black press consistently worked at educating America about the need for racial justice.