Blue Exorcist

Blue Exorcist

The Exwires learn the tragic story of what happened to Izumo’s mother, Tamamo, when the Illuminati’s mad Professor Gedoin sought her out in order to conduct his insane experiments. Now Izumo has been captured and is next on the professor’s list of test subjects. Rin, Yukio, Shiemi, Suguro and Konekomaru head deep into Dream Town Inari to rescue Izumo, but what they find there is a horror none of them ever expected... -- VIZ Media

Blue Exorcist

Blue Exorcist

The tragic story of what happened to Rin and Yukio’s mother, Yuri Egin, continues to unfold. Yuri and Father Fujimoto were once up-and-coming young Exorcists involved in Section 13’s extensive operation to research elixirs of immortality and develop clones to house the spirits of demons. The project seemed to be moving ahead until the unexpected manifestation of a demonic spirit into one of the clone bodies. And not just any demon—the most powerful demon of all: Satan! -- VIZ Media

Blue Exorcist

Blue Exorcist

Mephisto Pheles has freed his brother Amaimon from imprisonment and set him loose on True Cross Academy to serve his own agenda. While the Exwires deal with Amaimon’s surprise reappearance, Lewin Light, a.k.a. “Lightning,” continues to investigate the mysterious Section 13 and its connection to the Blue Night event that seems to be the source of all the current troubles. Together they delve deep beneath True Cross Academy, shedding light on long-lost chambers shrouded in darkness and the terrible secrets that were buried there for a reason... -- VIZ Media

Blue Exorcist

Blue Exorcist

Rin and his exorcist classmates are caught in a secret war against the forces of darkness. Raised by Father Fujimoto, a famous exorcist, Rin Okumura never knew his real father. One day a fateful argument with Father Fujimoto forces Rin to face a terrible truth – the blood of the demon lord Satan runs in Rin’s veins! Rin swears to defeat Satan, but doing that means entering the mysterious True Cross Academy and becoming an exorcist himself. The tragic story of what happened to Rin and Yukio’s mother, Yuri Egin, continues to unfold. Yuri and Father Fujimoto were once up-and-coming young Exorcists involved in Section 13’s extensive operation to research elixirs of immortality and develop clones to house the spirits of demons. The project seemed to be moving ahead until the unexpected manifestation of a demonic spirit into one of the clone bodies. And not just any demon—the most powerful demon of all: Satan!

The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 13

The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 13

Number 13 - lucky for horror fans! This award-winning anthology series has now reached its thirteenth spectacular volume and to mark the event, Steve Jones has chosen only the very best short stories and novellas by today's finest exponents of the horror genre. Contributors to this volume include: Gala Blau, Ramsey Campbell, Dennis Etchison, Charles Grant, Glen Hirshberg, Chico Kidd, Nancy Kilpatrick, Paul J. McAuley, Conrad Williams. Also featuring the most comprehensive overview of the year, a fascinating necrology and a list of useful contacts, this is the one book that all lovers of the supernatural and psychological terror will want on their shelves.

Blue Exorcist เอ็กซอร์ซิสต์พันธุ์ปีศาจ เล่ม 10

青の祓魔師 10巻

Blue Exorcist เอ็กซอร์ซิสต์พันธุ์ปีศาจ เล่ม 10

เพื่อนร่วมชั้นของรินที่ไม่น่าจะเห็นปีศาจได้ จู่ๆก็แหกปากให้ปีศาจที่เดินวนเวียนอยู่ในห้องเรียน หนำซ้ำเจ้าหญิงมลทินที่อยู่ในวงศ์เดียวกับราชามลทินยังฟื้นคืนชีพขึ้นมาอีก ลางร้ายเริ่มปกคลุมไปทั่วโลก…!? ระหว่างนั้นเองรินก็ได้รับจดหมายเชิญให้เข้าร่วมทานอาหารมื้อค่ำจากเมฟิสโต้!?

Global Manga

'Japanese' Comics without Japan?

Global Manga

Outside Japan, the term ’manga’ usually refers to comics originally published in Japan. Yet nowadays many publications labelled ’manga’ are not translations of Japanese works but rather have been wholly conceived and created elsewhere. These comics, although often derided and dismissed as ’fake manga’, represent an important but understudied global cultural phenomenon which, controversially, may even point to a future of ’Japanese’ comics without Japan. This book takes seriously the political economy and cultural production of this so-called ’global manga’ produced throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia and explores the conditions under which it arises and flourishes; what counts as ’manga’ and who gets to decide; the implications of global manga for contemporary economies of cultural and creative labour; the ways in which it is shaped by or mixes with local cultural forms and contexts; and, ultimately, what it means for manga to be ’authentically’ Japanese in the first place. Presenting new empirical research on the production of global manga culture from scholars across the humanities and social sciences, as well as first person pieces and historical overviews written by global manga artists and industry insiders, Global Manga will appeal to scholars of cultural and media studies, Japanese studies, and popular and visual culture.

Manga in America

Transnational Book Publishing and the Domestication of Japanese Comics

Manga in America

Japanese manga comic books have attracted a devoted global following. In the popular press manga is said to have “invaded” and “conquered” the United States, and its success is held up as a quintessential example of the globalization of popular culture challenging American hegemony in the twenty-first century. In Manga in America - the first ever book-length study of the history, structure, and practices of the American manga publishing industry - Casey Brienza explodes this assumption. Drawing on extensive field research and interviews with industry insiders about licensing deals, processes of translation, adaptation, and marketing, new digital publishing and distribution models, and more, Brienza shows that the transnational production of culture is an active, labor-intensive, and oft-contested process of “domestication.” Ultimately, Manga in America argues that the domestication of manga reinforces the very same imbalances of national power that might otherwise seem to have been transformed by it and that the success of Japanese manga in the United States actually serves to make manga everywhere more American.