Frontiers in Oncology World Cancer Day 2019 Special Edition

Frontiers in Oncology World Cancer Day 2019 Special Edition

Advances in cancer research over the recent decades have been plentiful and often successful, with 5 year survival rates increasing almost uniformly across the board. The advent of new technologies has presented solutions for yesterday’s barriers to research, allowing us to leap forward in our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat various cancers. Developments in omics studies has provided new insights into the underlying molecular basis of different cancers and their subtypes, greatly enhancing our understanding of the vast heterogeneity that exists. Progress in our ability to diagnose and detect early-stage cancers has resulted in numerous screening and prevention programs. Novel imaging technologies allow us to study and comprehend cancers with greater clarity than ever before. Although the field, as a whole, has experienced many successes, arduous challenges must be overcome in order to see continued success. The truth of the matter is cancer related deaths continue to rise in number worldwide, especially in lower- and middle-income countries. It is evident that there is still a lot of work to be done. This Frontiers in Oncology Special Issue marks the 1st edition of a collection of selected articles published in the journal over the course of the previous calendar year, highlighting ongoing research and advances being carried out in the different disciplines of cancer research.

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints, Fifth Edition Revised

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints, Fifth Edition Revised

The renowned Oxford Dictionary of Saints returns in a revised and updated form, providing concise accounts of the lives, cults, and artistic associations of over 1,400 saints, from the famous to the obscure. Featuring new entries on recently canonized saints from around the world, and a new appendix on pilgrimages.

Transitional Justice and the Politics of Inscription

Memory, Space and Narrative in Northern Ireland

Transitional Justice and the Politics of Inscription

Taking Northern Ireland as its primary case study, this book applies the burgeoning literature in memory studies to the primary question of transitional justice: how shall societies and individuals reckon with a traumatic past? Joseph Robinson argues that without understanding how memory shapes, moulds, and frames narratives of the past in the minds of communities and individuals, theorists and practitioners may not be able to fully appreciate the complex, emotive realities of transitional political landscapes. Drawing on interviews with what the author terms "memory curators," coupled with a robust analysis of secondary literature from a range of transitional cases, the book analyses how the bodies of the dead, the injured, and the traumatised are written into - or written out of - transitional justice. The author argues that scholars cannot appreciate the dynamism of transitional memory-space unless they first engage with the often silenced or marginalised voices whose memories remain trapped behind the antagonistic politics of fear and division. Ultimately challenging the imperative of national reconciliation, the author argues for a politics of public memory that incubates at multiple nodes of social production and can facilitate a vibrant, democratic debate over the ways in which a traumatic past can or should be remembered.

Books Ireland

Books Ireland