Regulation of Intracellular Ca2+-release Channels by Ca2+ & Ca2+-binding Proteins

Regulation of Intracellular Ca2+-release Channels by Ca2+ & Ca2+-binding Proteins

This is a Ph.D. dissertation. Almost everything we do is controlled by Ca2+, how we move, how our hearts beat and how our brains process information and store memories. Ca2+ is indeed a ubiquitous second messenger involved in a diversity of cellular activities such as muscular contraction, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, gene transcription, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The average cytosolic concentration of Ca2+ in resting cells ranges from 50nM to 100nM, reaching values close to 1uM when the cell is stimulated by a variety of physiological stimuli, while in the extracellular milieu this concentration is about 1mM. This large concentration gradient allows intracellular Ca2+ to work as a useful second messenger. Contents include: General Introduction, Objectives, Results, General Discussion, Summary.

Agriculture Handbook

Agriculture Handbook

Set includes revised editions of some issues.

The Rebel Den of Nung Tr Cao

Loyalty and Identity along the Sino-Vietnamese Frontier

The Rebel Den of Nung Tr Cao

The Rebel Den of Nung Tri Cao examines the rebellion of the eleventh-century Tai chieftain Nung Tri Cao (ca. 1025-1055), whose struggle for independence along Vietnam's mountainous northern frontier was a pivotal event in Sino-Vietnamese relations. Tri Cao's revolt occurred during Vietnam's earliest years of independence from China and would prove to be a vital test of the Vietnamese court's ability to confront local political challenges and maintain harmony with its powerful northern neighbor. Tri Cao established his first kingdom in 1042, at the age of seventeen, but was captured by Vietnamese troops. After his release in 1048, he announced the founding of a second kingdom, but an attack by Vietnamese forces drove him to flee into Chinese territory. Tri Cao made his final attempt in 1052, proclaiming a new kingdom and leading thousands of his subjects in a revolt that swept across the South China coast. But within a year, Chinese imperial troops had forced him to flee to the nearest independent kingdom. Official Chinese and Vietnamese accounts of the rebel leader's end vary: according to the Chinese, the ruler of the independent kingdom had Tri Cao executed, but in popular accounts, Tri Cao was granted safe passage into northern Thailand, where his descendants are said to flourish today. Scholar James Anderson places Tri Cao in context by exploring the Sino-Vietnamese tributary relationship and the conflicts that engaged both the Song and Vietnamese courts. The Rebel Den of Nung Tri Cao reconstructs the series of negotiations that took place between border communities and representatives of the imperial courts, examining the ways in which Tai and other ethnic groups deftly navigated the unstable political situation that followed the demise of China's cosmopolitan Tang dynasty. Though his rebellion was ill-fated, Tri Cao is, almost a thousand years later, still worshipped in temples along the Sino-Vietnamese border, and his memory provides a point of unity for people who have become separated by modern political boundaries.

The Politics of War Memory in Japan

Progressive Civil Society Groups and Contestation of Memory of the Asia-Pacific War

The Politics of War Memory in Japan

Since the 1990s, questions of Japanese wartime conduct, apologies for aggression, and compensation to former victims of the country’s imperial policies, have been brought to the fore of national and regional politics. The state is undoubtedly the most important actor in the process of memory production and along with conservative legislators and the grass-root revisionist movement there has been a consistent trend towards denying or undermining the existing acknowledgments of responsibility for Japan’s wartime past. However, to fully comprehend war memory in Japan, due attention must be paid to competing discourses that demand an alternative view, and only then can the complexity of Japanese war memory and attitudes towards the legacies of the Asia-Pacific war be understood. The Politics of War Memory in Japan examines the involvement of five civil society actors in the struggle over remembering and addressing the wartime past in Japan today. In studying progressive war memory activists, it quickly becomes clear that the apologia by conservative politicians cannot be treated as representative of the opinion of the majority of the Japanese public. Indeed, this book seeks to remedy the disparity between studies devoted to the official level of addressing the ‘history issue’ and the grass-root historical revisionist movement on the one side, and progressive activism on the other. Furthermore, it contributes to scholarly debates on the state of civil society in Japan, challenging the characterisation of Japanese civil society as a depoliticised space by demonstrating a more contentious side of civil society activism. Drawing important new empirical research, this book will be of huge interest to students and scholars of Japanese civil society, Japanese politics, Japanese history and memory in Japan.

O Menino

O Menino


Geologisches Zentralblatt

Anzeiger für Geologie, Petrographie, Palaeontologie und verwandte Wissenschaften. Geologie. Abt. A.

Geologisches Zentralblatt