City of Dreams

Dodger Stadium and the Birth of Modern Los Angeles

City of Dreams

A vivid history of the controversial building of Dodger Stadium and how it helped transform Los Angeles When Walter O’Malley moved his Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles in 1957 with plans to construct a new ballpark, he ignited a bitter half-decade dispute over the future of a rapidly changing city. For the first time, City of Dreams tells the full story of the controversial building of Dodger Stadium and how it helped create modern Los Angeles. In a vivid narrative, Jerald Podair tells how the city was convulsed over whether, where, and how to build the stadium. Eventually, it was built on publicly owned land from which the city had uprooted a Mexican American community, raising questions about the relationship between private profit and “public purpose.” Indeed, the battle over Dodger Stadium crystallized issues with profound implications for all American cities. Filled with colorful stories, City of Dreams will fascinate anyone who is interested in the history of the Dodgers, baseball, Los Angeles, and the modern American city.

The Routledge History of Twentieth-Century America

The Routledge History of Twentieth-Century America

The Routledge History of the Twentieth-Century United States is a comprehensive introduction to the most important trends and developments in the study of modern United States history. Driven by interdisciplinary scholarship, the thirty-four original chapters underscore the vast range of identities, perspectives and tensions that contributed to the growth and contested meanings of the United States in the twentieth century. The chronological and topical breadth of the collection highlights critical political and economic developments of the century while also drawing attention to relatively recent areas of research, including borderlands, technology and disability studies. Dynamic and flexible in its possible applications, The Routledge History of the Twentieth-Century United States offers an exciting new resource for the study of modern American history.

The Dodgers

60 Years in Los Angeles

The Dodgers

In 1957, the Dodgers left their home of Brooklyn, New York, where they had been since their inception in 1884, for the sunny hills of Los Angeles, California. Since arriving in LA, the team has won five World Series and ten NL Pennants, and become one of the top-grossing organizations in Major League Baseball. The Dodgers: 60 Years in LA chronicles the team’s impressive history since arriving in the West Coast. Covering the amazing feats of Dodgers greats such as Steve Garvey, Fernando Valenzuela, and Kirk Gibson, author Michael Schiavone offers an in-depth history of the team since their arrival in 1958 and through the 2017 season. With highlights of each season, the moments fans love to remember (or wish to forget), as well as those who have graced the field of Chavez Ravine, The Dodgers: 60 Years in LA shares the wonderful history of the boys in blue in the most comprehensive book available. Whether you’re a fan of the Dodgers of old or today’s team, this book offers the most information of the team’s time in California than any other on the market.

Sports Finance and Management

Real Estate, Media, and the New Business of Sport, Second Edition

Sports Finance and Management

As the sport business continues to evolve, so too, does Sport Finance and Management. The first version of this book took an in-depth look at changes in the sport industry, including interconnecting financial issues between teams and their associated businesses, the nature of fan loyalty influences, and the impact of sponsorship on team revenues. This second edition updates each of these elements, introduces relevant case study examples in new chapters, and examines the impact of changes in facility design, media opportunities, and league and conference policies on the economic success of teams, the salaries earned by professional players, and the finances of collegiate athletics.

Republican Populist

Spiro Agnew and the Origins of Donald Trump’s America

Republican Populist

Typically a maligned figure in American political history, former vice president Spiro T. Agnew is often overlooked. Although he is largely remembered for his alliterative speeches, attacks on the media and East Coast intellectuals, and his resignation from office in 1973 in the wake of tax evasion charges, Agnew had a significant impact on the modern Republican Party that is underappreciated. It is impossible, in fact, to understand the current internal struggles of the Republican Party without understanding this populist "everyman" and prototypical middle-class striver who was one of the first proponents of what would become the ideology of Donald Trump’s GOP. Republican Populist examines Agnew’s efforts to make the Republican Party representative of the "silent majority." Under the tutelage of a group of talented speechwriters assigned to Agnew by President Richard Nixon including Pat Buchanan and William Safire, Agnew crafted the populist-tinged, anti-establishment rhetoric that helped turn the Republican Party into a powerful national electoral force that has come to define American politics into the current era. A fascinating political portrait of Agnew from his pre–vice presidential career through his scandal-driven fall from office and beyond, this book is a revelatory examination of Agnew’s role as one of the founding fathers of the modern Republican Party and of the link between Agnew’s "people’s party" and the fraught party of populists and businessmen today.