Confessions of a Mask

Confessions of a Mask

When a Japanese youth discovers he has homosexual tendencies he hides himself behind conventional behavior

Five Modern No Plays

Five Modern No Plays

The classic Japanese No drama is one of the great art forms. Mishima has infused new life into the form by adopting it for plays that preserve the style and inner spirit of No while at the same time creating dramas that are contemporary and relevant.

Encyclopedia of the Novel

Encyclopedia of the Novel

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

A Primer of the Novel

For Readers and Writers

A Primer of the Novel

When the first edition of David Madden's A Primer of the Novel: For Readers and Writers was published more than twenty-five years ago, there were no other books of its kind available. Since then, many authors and editors have produced works that attempt the same comprehensive coverage of the genre. However, these works tend to be either written solely for writers or solely for readers. More often than not, those written for readers tend to be aimed at advanced students or critics of the novel. In this revised edition, David Madden, Charles Bane and Sean Flory have produced an updated work that is intended for a general readership including writers, teachers, and students who are just being introduced to the genre. This unique handbook provides a definition and history of the novel, a description of early narratives, and a discussion of critical approaches to this literary form. A Primer of the Novel also identifies terms, definitions, commentary, and examples in the form of quotations for almost 50 types of novels and 15 artistic techniques. A chronology of narrative in general and of the novel in particular—from 850 B. C. to the present—is also included, along with indexes to authors, titles, novel types and techniques, as well as a selective bibliography of criticism. Although all novel types present in the first edition are still represented, many have become more clearly defined. This revised edition also cites several types of novels that did not appear in the first edition, such as the graphic novel and the novel of Magical Realism. As well as keeping all of the original examples from representative texts, the authors have added new examples of more recent works. While this book was conceived for a general audience, it will be a valuable resource for students, teachers, and libraries. It may be used in any English literature courses at any level, including graduate, and is suited for creative writing courses as well. With its clear and immediately accessible features, this handbo

Translating Mount Fuji

Modern Japanese Fiction and the Ethics of Identity

Translating Mount Fuji

Dennis Washburn traces the changing character of Japanese national identity in the works of six major authors: Ueda Akinari, Natsume S?seki, Mori ?gai, Yokomitsu Riichi, ?oka Shohei, and Mishima Yukio. By focusing on certain interconnected themes, Washburn illuminates the contradictory desires of a nation trapped between emulating the West and preserving the traditions of Asia. Washburn begins with Ueda's Ugetsu monogatari (Tales of Moonlight and Rain) and its preoccupation with the distant past, a sense of loss, and the connection between values and identity. He then considers the use of narrative realism and the metaphor of translation in Soseki's Sanshiro; the relationship between ideology and selfhood in Ogai's Seinen; Yokomitsu Riichi's attempt to synthesize the national and the cosmopolitan; Ooka Shohei's post-World War II representations of the ethical and spiritual crises confronting his age; and Mishima's innovative play with the aesthetics of the inauthentic and the artistry of kitsch. Washburn's brilliant analysis teases out common themes concerning the illustration of moral and aesthetic values, the crucial role of autonomy and authenticity in defining notions of culture, the impact of cultural translation on ideas of nation and subjectivity, the ethics of identity, and the hybrid quality of modern Japanese society. He pinpoints the persistent anxiety that influenced these authors' writings, a struggle to translate rhetorical forms of Western literature while preserving elements of the pre-Meiji tradition. A unique combination of intellectual history and critical literary analysis, Translating Mount Fuji recounts the evolution of a conflict that inspired remarkable literary experimentation and achievement.

Confessions of a Sociopath

A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight

Confessions of a Sociopath

Confessions of a Sociopath is both the memoir of a high-functioning, law-abiding (well, mostly) sociopath and a roadmap -- right from the source -- for dealing with the sociopath in your life. As M.E. Thomas says of her fellow sociopaths, “We are your neighbors, your coworkers, and quite possibly the people closest to you: lovers, family, friends. Our risk-seeking behavior and general fearlessness are thrilling, our glibness and charm alluring. Our often quick wit and outside-the-box thinking make us appear intelligent—even brilliant. We climb the corporate ladder faster than the rest, and appear to have limitless self-confidence. Who are we? We are highly successful, noncriminal sociopaths and we comprise 4 percent of the American population.” Confessions of a Sociopath—part confessional memoir, part primer for the curious—takes readers on a journey into the mind of a sociopath, revealing what makes them tick while debunking myths about sociopathy and offering a road map for dealing with the sociopaths in your life. M. E. Thomas draws from her own experiences as a diagnosed sociopath, her popular Sociopathworld blog, and scientific literature to unveil for the very first time these men and women who are “hiding in plain sight.”

Confessions of a Fallen Angel

Confessions of a Fallen Angel

Following a near-death experience as a child, the narrator becomes cursed with the ability to foresee the deaths of the people closest to him. These visions come to him in his dreams and, following a disastrous attempt to save a childhood friend from drowning, a set of terrifying events begins to unfold. As a young man, he finds redemption in the arms of Ashling, his beautiful wife. But then the visions return... This is a story about one man`s struggle to live an ordinary life in extraordinary circumstances; about love lost and found and the vast range of emotions that can be weathered by the human heart. This is a story where dreams come true but can turn into nightmares; a place where true love will prevail and where death is only the beginning. \n \nSet in the fictional Dublin suburb of Rathgorman, CONFESSIONS OF A FALLEN ANGEL is a truly remarkable debut novel that will grip you from the first line and surprise you to the last.

Encyclopedia of Gay Histories and Cultures

Encyclopedia of Gay Histories and Cultures

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Tales of a Chinese Grandmother

30 Traditional Tales from China

Tales of a Chinese Grandmother

This illustrated multicultural children's book presents classic Chinese fairy tales and other folk stories—providing a delightful look into a rich literary culture. Chinese folklore tradition is as colorful and captivating as any in the world, but the stories themselves still are not as well-known to Western readers as those from The Brothers Grimm, Mother Goose, or Hans Christian Andersen. Tales of a Chinese Grandmother, written by Frances Carpenter, presents a collection of 30 authentic Chinese folktales. These classic stories represent the best of the Chinese folk tradition and are told here by the character Lao Lao, the beloved grandmother of the nineteenth-century Ling household. A sampling from a long and proud tradition, these Chinese folktales are sure to delight adults as well as children of all ages. Chinese children's stories include: How Pan Ku Made the World The God that Lived in the Kitchen The Daughter of the Dragon King The Grateful Fox Fairy The King of the Monkeys The Wonderful Pear Tree Ko-Ai's Lost Shoe Heng O, the Moon Lady The Old Old One's Birthday

Confessions of a Raving, Unconfined Nut

Misadventures in the Counterculture

Confessions of a Raving, Unconfined Nut

Uncensored, uncontained, and thoroughly demented, the memoirs of Paul Krassner are back in an updated and expanded edition. Paul Krassner, “father of the underground press” (People magazine), founder of the Realist, political radical, Yippie, and award-winning stand-up satirist, shares his stark raving adventures with the likes of Lenny Bruce, Abbie Hoffman, Norman Mailer, Ken Kesey, Groucho Marx, and Squeaky Fromme, revealing the patriarch of counterculture’s ultimate, intimate, uproarious life on the fringes of society. Whether he’s writing about his friendship with controversial comic Lenny Bruce, introducing Groucho Marx to LSD, his investigation of Scientology, or John Kennedy’s cadaver, no subject is too sacred to be skewered by Krassner. And yet his stories are soulful and philosophical, always authentic to his iconoclastic brand of personal journalism. As Art Spiegelman said, “Krassner is one of the best minds of his generational to be destroyed by madness, starving, hysterical, naked—but mainly hysterical. His true wacky, wackily true autobiography is the definitive book on the sixties.”