Creating Significant Learning Experiences

An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses

Creating Significant Learning Experiences

"Dee Fink challenges our conventional assumptions and practicesand offers an insightful approach to expanding our learning goals,making higher education more meaningful. This is a gem of a bookthat every college teacher should read." —Ken Bain,author, What the Best College Students Do Since the original publication of L. Dee Fink's CreatingSignificant Learning Experiences, higher education hascontinued to move in two opposite directions: more institutionsencourage faculty to focus on research, obtaining grants, andpublishing, while accreditation agencies, policy-makers, andstudents themselves emphasize the need for greater attention to thequality of teaching and learning. Now the author has updated his bestselling classic, providingbusy faculty with invaluable conceptual and procedural tools forinstructional design. Step by step, Fink shows how to use ataxonomy of significant learning and systematically combine thebest research-based practices for learning-centered teaching with ateaching strategy in a way that results in powerful learningexperiences. This edition addresses new research on how people learn, activelearning, and student engagement; includes illustrative examplesfrom online teaching; and reports on the effectiveness of Fink'stime-tested model. Fink also explores recent changes in highereducation nationally and internationally and offers more provenstrategies for dealing with student resistance to innovativeteaching. Tapping into the knowledge, tools, and strategies in CreatingSignificant Learning Experiences empowers educators tocreatively design courses that will result in significant learningfor their students. "As thought-provoking and inspiring today as it was when it wasfirst published, it is a 'must' for anyone serious about creatingcourses that challenge students to learn deeply."—Elizabeth F. Barkley, author, Student EngagementTechniques

Curriculum Internationalization and the Future of Education

Curriculum Internationalization and the Future of Education

In an effort to enhance the quality of education, universities and colleges are developing programs that help faculty and staff internationalize curriculum. These programs will purposefully develop the intercultural perspectives of students. Curriculum Internationalization and the Future of Education is a critical scholarly resource that examines the steps taken to diversify a number of courses from various disciplines and addresses the challenges with curriculum internationalization. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics, such as active learning, student engagement, and grounded globalism, this book is geared towards academics, upper-level students, educators, professionals, and practitioners seeking current research on curriculum internalization.

Blueprint for Learning

Constructing College Courses to Facilitate, Assess, and Document Learning

Blueprint for Learning

An acclaimed educator presents hands-on advice on teaching that meets today's emphasis on learning outcomes and assessment. This book is informed by the most up-to-date research on how people learn. It is suitable for all instructors in higher education - as well as high school teachers. Laurie Richlin has been running a workshop on course design for higher education for over fifteen years, modifying and improving it progressively from the feedback of participants, and from what they in turn have taught her. Her goals are to enable participants to appropriately select teaching strategies, to design and create the conditions and experiences that will enable their students to learn; and in the process to develop the scholarly scaffold to document their ongoing course design and achievements. This book familiarizes readers with course design elements; enables them to understand themselves as individuals and teachers; know their students; adapt to the learning environment; design courses that promote deep learning; and assess the impact of the teaching practices and design choices they have made. She provides tools to create a full syllabus, offers guidance on such issues as framing questions that encourage discussion, developing assignments with rubrics, and creating tests. The book is packed with resources that will help readers structure their courses and constitute a rich reference of proven ideas. What Laurie Richlin offers is a intellectual framework, set of tools and best practices to enable readers to design and continually reassess their courses to better meet their teaching goals and the learning needs of their students.

Innovative Learning for Leadership Development

New Directions for Student Leadership, Number 145

Innovative Learning for Leadership Development

Critically examine the intersections of learning and leadership. Using L. Dee Fink's taxonomy of signicant learning as a scaffold, experts in leadership education explain connections between emerging scholarship of teaching and learning and current trends in leadership, how to develop a more complex understanding of the levers of leadership learning, the environments that promote meaningful and measurable leadership learning, and the evidence behind such a practice. This volume examines: the role of leadership educator, the roles of authenticity (being true to one’s self) and criticality in education (interrogating beliefs and questioning power dynamics), select learning theories and their implications for leadership learning, and strategies for constructing leadership-related learning outcomes and assessing leadership learning. The Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Student Leadership explores leadership concepts and pedagogical topics of interest to high school and college leadership educators. Issues are grounded in scholarship and feature practical applications and best practices in youth and adult leadership education.

The Learner-Centered Curriculum

Design and Implementation

The Learner-Centered Curriculum

Praise for The Learner-Centered Curriculum "Cullen, Harris, and Hill provide a clear and practical framework for addressing the root of the problems of today's universities. The authors provide a lucid, actionable, and evidence-based prescription for building an integrated learning system to replace the hodgepodge of miscellany that we have inherited. They illustrate the kind of conversations and transformations that could raise the value of and change the prospects for higher education."—John Tagg, author, The Learning Paradigm College "This book offers a powerful, realistic, and much-needed plan for changing how learning happens in higher education. Anyone concerned about improving teaching and students' learning needs to read this book!"—Terry Doyle, author, Helping Students Learn in a Learner-Centered Environment "To help achieve the imperative to make our universities more learner-centered, the authors focus on curriculum redesign and offer a solid theoretical approach combined with applied skills that institutional leaders and faculty can use to attain their goals. Shared governance, autonomous learning, assessment, technology, and physical space are among the elements discussed in this excellent book that universities will need to consider when developing a new curriculum that is more learner-centered."—Jolene Koester, president, California State University, Northridge "Cullen, Harris, and Hill provide a thought-provoking resource with the compelling advantages and frameworks to create twenty-first-century student-centered, knowledge-centered, assessment-centered, and community-centered curriculum. This is a must-read for faculty and administrators committed to transforming their curriculum in order to educate better prepared graduates."—Deborah L. Ford, chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Parkside "This is the book that I have been looking for. Written by three leaders who have done the heavy lifting of leading real change, it's a book for every academic leader who understands that innovation is essential to the future of higher education."—Earl H. Potter, III, president, St. Cloud State University

Active Learning Spaces

New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 137

Active Learning Spaces

With the paradigm shift to student-centered learning, thephysical teaching space is being examined The configuration ofclassrooms, the technology within them, and the behaviors theyencourage are frequently represented as a barrier to enactingstudent-centered teaching methods, because traditionally designedrooms typically lack flexibility in seating arrangement, areconfigured to privilege a speaker at the front of the room, andlack technology to facilitate student collaboration. But many colleges and universities are redesigning the spaces inwhich students learn, collapsing traditional lecture halls and labsto create new, hybrid spaces—large technology-enrichedstudios—with the flexibility to support active andcollaborative learning in larger class sizes. With this change, ourclassrooms are coming to embody the 21st-century pedagogy whichmany educators accept, and research and teaching practice arebeginning to help us to understand the educational implications ofthoughtfully engineered classrooms—in particular, that spaceand how we use it affects what, how, and how much studentslearn. This is the 137th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher educationseries. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques forimproving college teaching based on the experience of seasonedinstructors and the latest findings of educational andpsychological researchers.

Student Writing in the Quantitative Disciplines

A Guide for College Faculty

Student Writing in the Quantitative Disciplines

Designing interesting problems and writing assignments is one of the chief tasks of all teachers, but it can be especially challenging to translate and apply learning theory, good teaching techniques, and writing assignments into STEM and other quantitative disciplines. Student Writing in the Quantitative Disciplines offers instructors in math-based disciplines meaningful approaches to making their coursework richer and more relevant for their students, as well as satisfying institutional imperatives for writing curricula. This important resource provides instructors with the hands-on skills needed to guide their students in writing well in quantitative courses at all levels of the college curriculum and to promote students' general cognitive and intellectual growth. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes: Ideas for using writing as a means of learning mathematical concepts Illustrative examples of effective writing activities and assignments in a number of different genres Assessment criteria and effective strategies for responding to students' writing Examples of ways to help students engage in peer review, revision, and resubmission of their written work "Those of us who spend our lives urging faculty in all disciplines to integrate more writing into their courses have wished for the day when someone like Patrick Bahls would step forward with a book like this one."—Chris M. Anson, University Distinguished Professor and director, Campus Writing and Speaking Program, North Carolina State University "Written by a mathematician, this readable, theoretically sound book describes practical strategies for teachers in the quantitative sciences to assign and respond to students' writing. It also describes numerous approaches to writing that engage students in disciplinary learning, collaborative discovery, and effective communication."—Art Young, Campbell Professor of English emeritus, Clemson University "Loaded with practical advice, this timely, important, and engaging book will be an invaluable resource for instructors wishing to bring the benefits of writing-to-learn to the quantitative disciplines. As a mathematician thoroughly grounded in writing-across-the-curriculum scholarship, Bahls brings humor, classroom experience, and pedagogical savvy to a mission he clearly loves—improving the quality of student learning in math and science."—John C. Bean, professor, Seattle University, and author, Engaging Ideas

Student Learning Abroad

What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do About It

Student Learning Abroad

A central purpose of this book is to question the claims commonly made about the educational benefits of study abroad. Traditional metrics of enrollment increases and student self-report, and practices of structural immersion, are being questioned as educators voice growing uncertainty about what students are or are not in fact learning abroad. This book looks into whether these criticisms are justified—and what can be done if they are. The contributors to this book offer a counter-narrative to common views that learning takes place simply through students studying elsewhere, or through their enrolling in programs that take steps structurally to “immerse” them in the experience abroad. Student Learning Abroad reviews the dominant paradigms of study abroad; marshals rigorous research findings, with emphasis on recent studies that offer convincing evidence about what undergraduates are or are not learning; brings to bear the latest knowledge about human learning and development that raises questions about the very foundations of current theory and practice; and presents six examples of study abroad courses or programs whose interventions apply this knowledge. This book provokes readers to reconsider long-held assumptions, beliefs and practices about teaching and learning in study abroad and to reexamine the design and delivery of their programs. In doing so, it provides a new foundation for responding to the question that may faculty and staff are now asking: What do I need to know, and what do I need to be able to do, to help my students learn and develop more effectively abroad? Contributors: Laura Bathurst Milton Bennett Gabriele Weber Bosley John Engle Lilli Engle Tara Harvey Mitchell Hammer David Kolb Bruce La Brack Kris Hemming Lou Kate McCleary Catherine Menyhart R. Michael Paige Angela Passarelli Adriana Medina-López Portillo Meghan Quinn Jennifer Meta Robinson Riikka Salonen Victor Savicki Douglas Stuart Michael Vande Berg James Zull While the authors who have contributed to Student Learning Abroad are all known for their work in advancing the field of education abroad, a number have recently been honored by leading international education associations. Bruce La Brack received NAFSA’s 2012 Teaching, Learning and Scholarship Award for Innovative Research and Scholarship. Michael Paige (2007) and Michael Vande Berg (2012) are recipients of the Forum on Education Abroad’s Peter A. Wollitzer Award.

Student Success in Community Colleges

A Practical Guide to Developmental Education

Student Success in Community Colleges

Student Success in Community Colleges As more and more underprepared students enroll in college, basic skills education is an increasing concern for all higher education institutions. Student Success in Community Colleges offers education leaders, administrators, faculty, and staff an essential resource for helping these students succeed and advance in college. By applying the book's self-assessment instrument, colleges can pinpoint how their current activities align with the most effective proven practices. Once the gaps are identified, community college leaders can determine the best strategic direction for improvement. Drawing on a broad knowledge base and illustrative examples from the most current literature, the authors cover organizational, administrative, and instructional practices; program components; student support services and strategies; and professional learning and development. Designed to help engage community college leadership and practitioners in addressing the practices, structures, and obstacles that enhance or impede the success of basic skills students, the book's strategies can be tailored to various institutional levels, showing how to unite faculty, staff, and administrators in a cooperative effort to effect institutional change. Finally, Student Success in Community Colleges reveals how investing in a comprehensive basic skills infrastructure can be a financially sustainable model for the institution as well as substantially beneficial to students and society. "This is a most unusual and valuable book; it is packed with careful analysis and practical suggestions for improving basic skills programs in community colleges. Compiled by a team of practicing professionals in teaching, administration, and research, it is knowledgeable about what has been done and imaginative and practical about what can be done to improve the access and success of community college students."—K. Patricia Cross, professor of higher education, emerita, University of California, Berkeley "For its first hundred years the community college was committed primarily to access; in its second hundred years the commitment has changed dramatically to success. This book provides the best road map to date on how community colleges can reach that goal."—Terry O'Banion, president emeritus, League for Innovation, and director, Community College Leadership Program, Walden University "This guide is the most comprehensive source of information about all facets of basic skills or developmental education. It will be invaluable not just to community college educators across the nation, but also to those in high schools and four-year colleges who share similar problems."—W. Norton Grubb, David Gardner Chair in Higher Education, University of California, Berkeley