Reworking the Student Departure Puzzle

Reworking the Student Departure Puzzle

More than a quarter of the students who enter four-year institutions and half of those who enter two-year schools depart at the end of their first year. This phenomenon is known as the "departure puzzle," and for years, the most important body of work on student retention has come from sociologist Vincent Tinto. The contributors, including Tinto himself, offer a variety of both theoretical and methodological perspectives to the Student Departure Puzzle.

Departure

And Other Stories

Departure

Stories of courage against oppression by one of twentieth-century America’s most fearless writers These nineteen stories follow the paths of men and women, immigrants, minorities, and the poor, suffering from injustice and inequality. Written in the 1940s, Fast’s clear-eyed and lively tales examine a world reeling from war and plagued by social unrest. With stories set in New York City, Europe, and India, this collection shares a remarkable global vision. Written during the rising Communist scare, Departure is a defiantly leftist portrait of a complex and ever-changing world. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Howard Fast including rare photos from the author’s estate.

Departure and Consolation

The Johannine Farewell Discourses in Light of Greco-Roman Literature

Departure and Consolation

This study employs classical literature to interpret new aspects of the Johannine Farewell Discourses that have been understood previously through recourse to Jewish literature. The puzzling pause of Jesus at 14:31 and the function of the Paraclete receive particular attention.

Understanding and Reducing College Student Departure

ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 30, Number 3

Understanding and Reducing College Student Departure

Student departure is a long-standing problem to colleges anduniversities. Approximately 45 percent of students enrolled intwo-year colleges depart during their first year, and approximatelyone out of four students departs from a four-year college oruniversity. The authors advance a serious revision of Tinto'spopular interactionalist theory to account for student departure,and they postulate a theory of student departure in commutercolleges and universities. This volume delves into the literature to describe exemplarycampus-based programs designed to reduce student departure. Itemphasizes the importance of addressing student departure through amultidisciplinary approach, engaging the whole campus. It proposesnew models for nonresidential students and students from diversebackgrounds, and suggests directions for further research. Academic and student affairs administrators seekingresearch-based approaches to understanding and reducing studentdeparture will profit from reading this volume. Scholars of thecollege student experience will also find it valuable in definingnew thrusts in research on the student departure process.

Point of Departure

Returning to Our More Authentic Worldview for Education and Survival

Point of Departure

Point of Departure offers a practical metacognitive and transformational learning strategy for human surviving and thriving. Using five foundational and interactive Indigenous worldview beliefs that contrast sharply with our dominant worldview ones, everyone can reclaim the original instructions for living on Earth. Without the resulting change in consciousness that can emerge from this learning approach, no modern technologies can save us. The five foundational Indigenous precepts relate to a radically different understanding about: (1) Trance?based learning (2) Courage and Fearlessness (3) Community Oriented Self?Authorship (4) Sacred Communications (5) Nature as Ultimate Teacher Praise for Point of Departure: Four Arrows provides a quintessential critique of how the collective human departure of modern society from “Indigenous Consciousness” has led to the current wholesale exploitation and destruction of “Indigenous Nature” ... while providing the impetus for the urgency of a return to the “Indigenous Mind” as one of the true pathways for our future survival. ~ Greg Cajete Director of Native American Studies, University of New Mexico. Author of Native Science and Look to the Mountain Recognizing the disastrous consequences of the dominant worldview pervading global society, Four Arrows teaches metacognitive strategies to help shift us back toward the Indigenous worldview—the only worldview that can restore balance amidst planetary crisis. With his characteristic insight, he reminds us that interconnectedness with all of creation is the basis of courage that will help each of us, Indigenous and non?Indigenous alike, rise to action in defense of Mother Earth. ~ Waziyatawin Dakota author and activist from Pezihutazizi K’api Makoce (Land Where They Dig for Yellow Medicine) in southwestern Minnesota Four Arrows continues to open our eyes to the possibility of a new society, one founded on the empirical data of thousands of years and within the paradigms of traditional wisdom and the people connected to all of life—theirs, ours, animal brethren and Mother Earth. Point of Departure is a MUST read for anyone who wants to be part of the solution. ~ Rebecca Adamson Founder/President First Peoples Worldwide Anyone who is even slightly Indigenous will nod in recognition all the way through Point of Departure. Using the four sacred directions as cognitive bridges into the circle of all, Four Arrows walks the reader through trance?based, Transformative learning; courage, Indian?style, as connection not fearbased; and the Indigenous grammar of communication and truthtelling, with neither restricted to humans. Then, binding the hoop together for “all our relations,” Four Arrows recommends reacquaintance with Nature. The handy “take?away” discussions and “how?to” manuals concluding each discussion draw the reader into the circle, if only the reader is willing. ~ Barbara Alice Mann Associate Professor of Humanities, University of Toledo. Author of Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath: The Twinned Cosmos of Indigenous America

Driving Down Lane-departure Crashes

A National Priority

Driving Down Lane-departure Crashes

While this report highlights a number of remedies for keeping drivers on the road, the essential ingredient in improving our safety record is your commitment as the leader of a state department of transportation. Through AASHTO we have set an aggressive goal to reduce the nation's current level of highway fatalities by 1,000 every year for the next two decades. That will reduce highway deaths by half, on our way to the ultimate goal of eliminating them entirely.

The Departure of an Apostle

Paul's Death Anticipated and Remembered

The Departure of an Apostle

What was Paul's attitude toward his own death? How did he act and what did he say and write in view of it? What hopes did he hold for himself beyond death? Alexander N. Kirk explores these questions through a close reading of four Pauline letters that look ahead to Paul's death and other relevant texts in the first two generations after Paul's death (AD 70-160). The author studies portraits of the departed Paul in Acts, 1 Clement, the letters of Ignatius, Polycarp's letter To the Philippians, and the Martyrdom of Paul. He also examines portraits of the departing Paul in 1 and 2 Corinthians, Philippians, and 2 Timothy, arguing that Paul's death did not primarily present an existential challenge, but a pastoral one. Although touching upon several areas of recent scholarly interest, Alexander N. Kirk sets forth a new research question and fresh interpretations of early Christian and Pauline texts.

A Place of Departure

A Collection of Poems and Small Stories 2008 - 2009

A Place of Departure

Focusing a variety of subjects - life, death, love, the whimsical, the philosophical - the authors poems and stories present his readers with special windows into his unique visions and interpretations of the world. He writes poems and stories for all ages and is truly at home with both genres. The author is currently working on a second book of poetry for children.