Devil In The Grove

Author: Gilbert King
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062097717
Size: 11.44 MB
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Devil in the Grove, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, is a gripping true story of racism, murder, rape, and the law. It brings to light one of the most dramatic court cases in American history, and offers a rare and revealing portrait of Thurgood Marshall that the world has never seen before. As Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns did for the story of America’s black migration, Gilbert King’s Devil in the Grove does for this great untold story of American legal history, a dangerous and uncertain case from the days immediately before Brown v. Board of Education in which the young civil rights attorney Marshall risked his life to defend a boy slated for the electric chair—saving him, against all odds, from being sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit.

Thurgood Marshall A Life In American History

Author: Spencer R. Crew
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440861455
Size: 43.35 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This compelling new biography introduces the reader to the constant battles for equality faced by African Americans through a study of the career of Thurgood Marshall, who believed in the power of the law to change a society. • Provides the reader with a better understanding of the challenges faced by African Americans in the twentieth century • Highlights the courage and determination of Marshall in the face of constant danger as well as the courage of the individuals who were willing to go to court in spite of the attacks and repercussions they faced in their communities • Illustrates the importance of the Supreme Court with regard to progress in civil rights • Brings to light Marshall's importance as a protector of human rights while serving as a Supreme Court Justice • Points out the key court cases that undermined the system of segregation in the United States • Includes archival photographs and primary documents related to help bring Marshall's experiences to life

Time Thurgood Marshall

Author: The Editors of TIME
Publisher: Time Inc. Books
ISBN: 1683301072
Size: 45.95 MB
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As an accomplished civil rights lawyer, then serving as the first African-American justice on the Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall changed the face and course of justice in America, becoming an inspirational figure for millions. From his early days at Howard University, to his 25-year association with the NAACP, and the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education, he championed and triumphed in dozens of cases on civil liberties, affirmative action, the rights of the accused, and the death penalty. As a Supreme Court Justice, his interpretation of the Constitution led to the insurance of fair treatment for the disadvantaged in a world where judges, police, and legislatures could not be counted on to use their power fairly, and he became a voice for the voiceless. Now, in a new Special Edition from TIME, Thurgood Marshall: The Visionary, his life and legacy are examined through thoughtful essays and historic photographs. This Special Edition traces his upbringing in Baltimore, MD, his years in college and law school, his work with the NAACP, his relationship with Lyndon Johnson and more. Chapters outline the major cases that came before the Court during his tenure along with his position, and another, ÒIn Their Own Words,Ó brings together thoughtful remembrances from those who knew and worked alongside him, including Vernon Jordon, Juan Williams and Constance Baker Motley. Firmly placing Marshall in the context of his time as a visionary and examining how his social and legal legacy lives on to this day, Thurgood Marshall is a thoughtful portrait of a great American.

Showdown

Author: Wil Haygood
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385353162
Size: 35.98 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Thurgood Marshall brought down the separate-but-equal doctrine, integrated schools, and not only fought for human rights and human dignity but also made them impossible to deny in the courts and in the streets. In this stunning new biography, award-winning author Wil Haygood surpasses the emotional impact of his inspiring best seller The Butler to detail the life and career of one of the most transformative legal minds of the past one hundred years. Using the framework of the dramatic, contentious five-day Senate hearing to confirm Marshall as the first African-American Supreme Court justice, Haygood creates a provocative and moving look at Marshall’s life as well as the politicians, lawyers, activists, and others who shaped—or desperately tried to stop—the civil rights movement of the twentieth century: President Lyndon Johnson; Congressman Adam Clayton Powell Jr., whose scandals almost cost Marshall the Supreme Court judgeship; Harry and Harriette Moore, the Florida NAACP workers killed by the KKK; Justice J. Waties Waring, a racist lawyer from South Carolina, who, after being appointed to the federal court, became such a champion of civil rights that he was forced to flee the South; John, Robert, and Ted Kennedy; Senator Strom Thurmond, the renowned racist from South Carolina, who had a secret black mistress and child; North Carolina senator Sam Ervin, who tried to use his Constitutional expertise to block Marshall’s appointment; Senator James Eastland of Mississippi, the head of the Senate Judiciary Committee, who stated that segregation was “the law of nature, the law of God”; Arkansas senator John McClellan, who, as a boy, after Teddy Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to dinner at the White House, wrote a prize-winning school essay proclaiming that Roosevelt had destroyed the integrity of the presidency; and so many others. This galvanizing book makes clear that it is impossible to overestimate Thurgood Marshall’s lasting influence on the racial politics of our nation. From the Hardcover edition.

Thurgood Marshall

Author: Charles L. Zelden
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136174958
Size: 42.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Thurgood Marshall was an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. He was the first African American to hold that position, and was one of the most influential legal actors of his time. Before being appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson, Marshall was a lawyer for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Federal Judge (1961-1965), and Solicitor General of the United States (1965-1966). Marshall won twenty-nine of thirty-two cases before the Supreme Court – most notably the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which held segregated public schools unconstitutional. Marshall spent his career fighting racial segregation and legal inequality, and his time on the court establishing a record for supporting the "voiceless American." He left a legacy of change that still affects American society today. Through this concise biography, accompanied by primary sources that present Marshall in his own words, students will learn what Marshall did (and did not do) during his life, why those actions were important, and what effects his efforts had on the larger course of American history.

Conviction

Author: Denver Nicks
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1613738366
Size: 22.33 MB
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On New Year's Eve, 1939, a horrific triple murder occurred in rural Oklahoma. Within a matter of days, investigators identified several suspects: convicts who had been at a craps game with one of the victims the night before. Also at the craps game was a young black farmer named W. D. Lyons. As anger at authorities grew, political pressure mounted to find a villain. The governor's representative settled on Lyons, who was arrested, tortured into signing a confession, and tried for the murder. The NAACP's new Legal Defense and Education Fund sent its young chief counsel, Thurgood Marshall, to take part in the trial. The NAACP desperately needed money, and Marshall was convinced that the Lyons case could be a fundraising boon for both the state and national organizations. It was. The case went on to the US Supreme Court, and the NAACP raised much-needed money from the publicity. Conviction is the story of Lyons v. Oklahoma, the oft-forgotten case that set Marshall and the NAACP on the path that led ultimately to victory in Brown v. Board of Education and the accompanying social revolution in the United States.

Beneath A Ruthless Sun

Author: Gilbert King
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0399183434
Size: 23.30 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY NPR and THE WASHINGTON POST "Compelling, insightful and important, Beneath a Ruthless Sun exposes the corruption of racial bigotry and animus that shadows a community, a state and a nation. A fascinating examination of an injustice story all too familiar and still largely ignored, an engaging and essential read." --Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller Devil in the Grove, the gripping true story of a small town with a big secret. In December 1957, the wife of a Florida citrus baron is raped in her home while her husband is away. She claims a "husky Negro" did it, and the sheriff, the infamous racist Willis McCall, does not hesitate to round up a herd of suspects. But within days, McCall turns his sights on Jesse Daniels, a gentle, mentally impaired white nineteen-year-old. Soon Jesse is railroaded up to the state hospital for the insane, and locked away without trial. But crusading journalist Mabel Norris Reese cannot stop fretting over the case and its baffling outcome. Who was protecting whom, or what? She pursues the story for years, chasing down leads, hitting dead ends, winning unlikely allies. Bit by bit, the unspeakable truths behind a conspiracy that shocked a community into silence begin to surface. Beneath a Ruthless Sun tells a powerful, page-turning story rooted in the fears that rippled through the South as integration began to take hold, sparking a surge of virulent racism that savaged the vulnerable, debased the powerful, and roils our own times still.

Wreck Of The Whale Ship Essex The Complete Illustrated Edition

Author: Owen Chase
Publisher: Zenith Press
ISBN: 076034812X
Size: 19.98 MB
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"An illustrated edition of the firsthand account of the whaler Essex's attack and sinking by a sperm whale, the inspiration for Moby-Dick. Includes a new introduction and supplementary extracts from a variety of sources"--

Remembering Paradise Park

Author: Lu Vickers
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813061528
Size: 79.72 MB
Format: PDF
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"A strange and unsettling glimpse of the land of sun and surf in the waning moments of segregation in the South."--Gilbert King, author of Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America "A testament to the efforts of a black community determined to provide wholesome recreation for their families in a segregated society. This masterpiece of local history changes the way we think about the history of tourism and civil rights."--Susan Sessions Rugh, author of Are We There Yet?: The Golden Age of American Family Vacations "The story of Florida tourism has been told in many ways, but this book gives a perspective that has been missing from most of them. Vickers and Wilson-Graham finally open the gates to Paradise Park so that all are welcome to sample its wonders."--Tim Hollis, author of Selling the Sunshine State: A Celebration of Florida Tourism Advertising "An invaluable time capsule. This bittersweet book vividly describes the joys of Paradise Park, while acceptance and endurance of racist practices are also remembered and voiced."--Marsha Dean Phelts, author of An American Beach for African Americans Paradise Park was the "colored only" counterpart to Silver Springs, a central Florida tourist attraction famous for its crystal-clear water and glass bottom boats. Together the two parks comprised one of the biggest recreational facilities in the country before Disney World. From 1949 to 1969, boats passed each other on the Silver River--blacks on one side, whites on the other. Though the patrons of both parks shared the same river, they seldom crossed the invisible line in the water. Full of vivid photographs, vintage advertisements, and interviews with employees and patrons, Remembering Paradise Park portrays a place of delight and leisure during the painful era of Jim Crow. Racial violence was at its height in Florida--the famous Groveland rape case happened right as Paradise Park opened--and many African Americans saw the park as a safe place for families. It was a popular vacation spot for the area's black community, one of the most cohesive and prosperous in the South. Tracing the color line through Florida's most famous spring, this book compares the park to other tourist destinations set aside for African Americans in the state and across the country. Though Silver Springs was Florida's only attraction to operate a parallel facility for African Americans, Paradise Park has been just a whisper in the story of Florida tourism until now.