Germania in Africa

Germany's Colonial Literature

Germania in Africa

This work represents the first attempt in English at a comprehensive and critical examination of German colonial literature. The author traces the origin and development of this genre via a thorough chronological survey of its most significant exponents, assesses the ideological impact on its late 19th century German readership, and follows up its unsuspected survival and further development in the ranks of the National Socialist movement and among contemporary right wing elements in the Federal Republic.

Rome and the Counter-Reformation in Scandinavia

Jesuit Educational Strategy, 1553-1622

Rome and the Counter-Reformation in Scandinavia

This volume deals with Jesuit educational strategy in the far North with a view to infiltrating the body politic of the Scandinavian kingdoms. Reactions and counter-reactions are traced as far as extant authentic and original documents permit.

A Revolution from Above?

The Power State of 16th and 17th Century Scandinavia

A Revolution from Above?

In the 16th and 17th centuries, the states of Europe underwent a series of changes which created the foundation for the state of today. The Nordic countries played their part in that process, but also demonstrated differences relative to each other. Scandinavia appears in this context as an interesting area for study. Three Nordic researchers have analysed some of these changes and their consequences at the level of the state, the region and the local district. During the 16th and 17th centuries the peoples of the Nordic countries experienced a strengthening of state power which imposed upon them increased taxes and other burdens, not least as a result of the frequent wars of the time. Ambitions to appear as a power-state and to try increasingly to regulate society and impose discipline on subjects took the form of an interplay between the power of the state and the local community which exposed the limited ability of the state to insist upon its will.

Roman Alpine Routes

(with Map Showing Chief Roman Passes)

Roman Alpine Routes


The Ballet of the Planets

A Mathematician's Musings on the Elegance of Planetary Motion

The Ballet of the Planets

The Ballet of the Planets unravels the beautiful mystery of planetary motion, revealing how our understanding of astronomy evolved from Archimedes and Ptolemy to Copernicus, Kepler, and Newton. Mathematician Donald Benson shows that ancient theories of planetary motion were based on the assumptions that the Earth was the center of the universe and the planets moved in a uniform circular motion. Since ancient astronomers noted that occasionally a planet would exhibit retrograde motion--would seem to reverse its direction and move briefly westward--they concluded that the planets moved in epicyclic curves, circles with smaller interior loops, similar to the patterns of a child's Spirograph. With the coming of the Copernican revolution, the retrograde motion was seen to be apparent rather than real, leading to the idea that the planets moved in ellipses. This laid the ground for Newton's great achievement--integrating the concepts of astronomy and mechanics--which revealed not only how the planets moved, but also why. Throughout, Benson focuses on naked-eye astronomy, which makes it easy for the novice to grasp the work of these pioneers of astronomy.

An Academic Life Over Continents

Reflections of an Afrikaner on the Changes which Engulfed South Africa During the Second Half of the Twentieth Century

An Academic Life Over Continents