Do No Harm

Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery

Do No Harm

Winner of the PEN Ackerley Prize and the South Bank Sky Arts Award for Literature Shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award; Duff Cooper Prize; Wellcome Book Prize; Guardian First Book Award; and Slightly Foxed Best First Biography Prize Longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction What is it like to be a brain surgeon? How does it feel to hold someone's life in your hands, to cut through the stuff that creates thought, feeling and reason? How do you live with the consequences when it all goes wrong? DO NO HARM offers an unforgettable insight into the highs and lows of a life dedicated to operating on the human brain, in all its exquisite complexity. With astonishing candour and compassion, Henry Marsh reveals the exhilarating drama of surgery, the chaos and confusion of a busy modern hospital, and above all the need for hope when faced with life's most agonising decisions.

Do No Harm by Henry Marsh | Summary & Analysis

Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery

Do No Harm by Henry Marsh | Summary & Analysis

Do No Harm by Henry Marsh | Summary & Analysis Preview: Do No Harm is neurosurgeon Henry Marsh’s memoir, with a particular focus on his mistakes and regrets. Marsh admits that he grew up privileged. He began his college career studying English, but quit school due to an unrequited love. He took a job working in a mining town hospital, an experience that inspired him to become a surgeon. He returned to Oxford to finish his degree and then attended the Royal Free Medical School in London, the only medical school at the time that did not require him to have any scientific qualifications. As a medical student, Marsh worked as a nursing assistant on the psycho-geriatric ward of a long term psychiatric hospital. There he saw many patients who had been given lobectomies at the hospital where he would later train. Lobectomies were an accepted method of treating severe mental disorders, but would often leave the patient worse off than they were before… PLEASE NOTE: This is a summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread Summary & Analysis of Do No Harm • Summary of book • Introduction to the Important People in the book • Analysis of the Themes and Author’s Style

Explorations of a Mind-Traveling Sociologist

Explorations of a Mind-Traveling Sociologist

"Explorations of a Mind-Traveling Sociologist" is a book of thematically interconnected ethnographic essays by the internationally esteemed sociologist Renée C. Fox, who employs a participant observer outlook to provide unique insight on such enduring—and pressing—issues as the lived experiences of physicians and patients, including patients who are physically challenged, elderly, mortally ill or beyond the reach of medical care; the origins and consequences of epidemic outbreaks of old and new plague-like infectious diseases that occur and recur, despite the impressive advances of medicine; the concomitants and challenges of aging; the wellsprings, dynamics and significance of medical humanitarian action; engagement with a “beyond borders” world view; the occurrence of national and international events of major moral as well as political and legal import and repercussions; and the meaning and meaningfulness of teaching, exploring, questing and writing. Latently associated with these themes are the author’s social values and social conscience. Composing these essays from a participant observer outlook heightens and enriches the author’s observations over the course of her daily life, enabling her to engage in “mind travel” to places and people she has intimately known in the past and to places she has yearningly hoped to visit but never has.

Sceptical Christianity

Exploring Credible Belief

Sceptical Christianity

How can Christianity remain a credible religion in our current era of scepticism? Reviving the debates begun by John Robinson and the demythologisation movement over half a century ago, Sceptical Christianity considers the main reasons behind people's religious scepticism and posits the question: what can be plausibly believed today? Reiss discusses issues of such as the relationship between religion and science and assisted dying, much debated among people of faith and no faith,, and shows how they can be thought of in the best tradition of sceptical and critical Christianity. The result is a thought provoking book which sparks discussion on how the Church should behave and teach to retain its credibility.

Return of Compassion to Healthcare

Return of Compassion to Healthcare

While advances in medical science and disease treatments are always welcome, real transformation of healthcare requires us to focus on whole persons, not just maladies. Our responsibilities to ill people, and frail elders, including those with dementia, are not merely obligations, but also response-abilities. Beyond relieving suffering and meeting their basic biological needs, we can nurture each individual as a whole person and promote his or her wellbeing. The benefits are tangible and mutual. Helping professionals are rewarded through the deep and meaningful connections they form with the remarkable people they serve. In Return of Compassion to Healthcare the Tellis-Nayaks offer blueprints for person-centered care that can guide leaders of healthcare, aging services, government and business in building enlightened clinical programs and assisted-living communities for medically ill and otherwise vulnerable people. As Vivian and Mary Tellis-Nayak so clearly show, solutions are available. Evidence-based treatments are valuable, however, the best care is also tender and loving. Ira Byock, MD is founder and chief medical officer for the Institute for Human Caring, Providence Health & Service. His books include Dying Well and The Best Care Possible.

The Breakthrough Factor

Creating a Life of Value for Success and Happiness

The Breakthrough Factor

Helps readers evaluate what principles drive them and how they can change their lives by rooting out negative principles

Dark Age Britain

Some Sources of History

Dark Age Britain


British Documents of Liberty

From Earliest Times to Universal Suffrage

British Documents of Liberty

From the Coronation Charter of Henry I in 1101, through the Magna Carta and the Reform Acts, to Representation of the People Act of 1918, Marsh includes the texts of the most important documents of British rights and freedoms.

A Turbulent Wake

Poems of Islands, Paintings and People

A Turbulent Wake

Following on the warm critical reception given to Henry Marsh's first collection of poems, A First Sighting, this new volume gives us further insight into the mind of one of Scotland's finest poets.The influence of the Hebrides is again strong here - that world where, as the poet observes, people do not lock their doors - but, as in his first collection, Henry Marsh takes us a good deal further here and includes both a number of moving personal poems and more formal reflections on art. The result is a stunning collection. This is a book which gives us a moment of civil company in a strident world; a book which is in every sense lovely; a book with gentle resonances that heal and persist, like the memories of those beguiling islands that shape many of these poems.--Alexander McCall Smith.