Queen of all - Reina de Todos

Queen of all - Reina de Todos

El plan de las apariciones marianas para unir a todas las religiones bajo la Iglesia Católica Romana Según el libro de Apocalipsis, una mujer reinará sobre los reyes de la tierra en los últimos días. El apóstol Juan quedó “asombrado con gran asombro” cuando vio a la mujer que dice en su corazón: “Yo estoy sentada como reina” (Apocalipsis 18:7). Se nos dice incluso que ella se sentará sobre las naciones (Apocalipsis 17:15). El profeta Isaías también previó a una mujer llamada “señora de reinos” (Isaías 47). Irónicamente, Isaías predice que la verdadera identidad de ella permanecería oculta hasta el fin. ¿Quién es esta Reina y Señora? ¿Cómo es posible que domine a naciones y reinos? ¿Cuál será su destino y el de los que la siguen? La Biblia —la inspirada Palabra de Dios— identifica numerosas tendencias de los últimos días que parecen estar culminando ante nuestros ojos. Con el cumplimiento de las profecías, parece extraño que muchos creyentes ignoren los planes de la “mujer”. Sin embargo, Dios explica la razón, porque Él ve a la Señora diciendo en su corazón: “Nadie me ve” (Isaías 47:10). Es hora de revelar este misterio y exponer la identidad de la Reina. El registro perfecto de la Biblia garantiza que las actividades relacionadas con la Reina afectarán a todo el mundo. ¿Cómo podemos escapar? ¿Qué podemos hacer a fin de prepararnos para lo que pronto puede suceder? Este libro presenta la respuesta de Dios.

The Herald's History of Los Angeles City

The Herald's History of Los Angeles City

The career of a city contains as much good material, out of which an entertaining history may be constructed, as does the life of an individual, or the development of a nation; but, for some reason, it has come to pass in America that the preparation of city, or "local", history has usually fallen into the hands of schemers who exploit the "prominent" citizen for his biography, and throw in something of a narrative, merely as an apology for the book's existence. The present book is an attempt to supply in convenient and portable shape the material facts in the history of Los Angeles city. It contains nothing in the form of paid or biographical matter (strange that such a statement should be needed!), and it is offered for sale at the bookshops on its merits as a book.

American Disruptor

The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford

American Disruptor

American Disruptor is the untold story of Leland Stanford – from his birth in a backwoods bar to the founding of the world-class university that became and remains the nucleus of Silicon Valley. The life of this robber baron, politician, and historic influencer is the astonishing tale of how one supremely ambitious man became this country's original "disruptor" – reshaping industry and engineering one of the greatest raids on the public treasury for America’s transcontinental railroad, all while living more opulently than maharajas, kings, and emperors. It is also the saga of how Stanford, once a serial failure, overcame all obstacles to become one of America’s most powerful and wealthiest men, using his high elective office to enrich himself before losing the one thing that mattered most to him – his only child and son. Scandal and intrigue would follow Stanford through his life, and even after his death, when his widow was murdered in a Honolulu hotel – a crime quickly covered up by the almost stillborn university she had saved. Richly detailed and deeply researched, American Disruptor restores Leland Stanford’s rightful place as a revolutionary force and architect of modern America.

The Los Angeles Barrio, 1850-1890

A Social History

The Los Angeles Barrio, 1850-1890

"An imponant book .... [which] provides the first detailed analysis of the changes that transformed one of the most important Mexican pueblos in the Southwest into a Chicano urban barrio. Using quantitative data together with traditional secondary and primary historical sources, the author traces the major socio-economic, political, and racial factors that evolved during the post-Mexican War decades and that created a subordinate status for Mexican Americans in a burgeoning American city."--Western Historical Quarterly "Griswold del Castillo's history of the Mexican community during the first decades of the 'American era' . . . concentrates on the mechanisms which the community adopted as it was confronted by changes in the economic structure of the region, the in-migration of Anglo-Americans as well as Mexicans, and by the effects of racial segregation on the community. [The] aim is to reveal the history of a community undergoing rapid social and economic change, not to write the history of one society's domination of another."--UCLA Historical Journal "Los Angeles Chicanos emerge not as the homogeneous, passive victims of stereotypical fame, but as internally diverse, active participants in the simultaneous struggles to maintain their socio-cultural fabric and to capture a part of the American Dream. The author effectively demonstrates that the Chicano decline occurred not because of cultural weaknesses but as the almost inevitable resu lt of Anglo prejudice, numerical domination, and control of political and economic institutions. . . . an admirable book and a fine piece of scholarship.''--American Historical Review

Los Angeles's Olvera Street

Los Angeles's Olvera Street

Olvera Street Mexican marketplace and its plaza form the home of Latino culture in the Los Angeles region. Still standing in this downtown location of many fiestas, including Cinco de Mayo, are the Avila Adobe, plaza church-- La Iglesia de Nuestra Se±ora La Reina de Los Angeles, Pico House, Sepulveda House, and L.A. Firehouse No. 1. El Pueblo de La Reina de Los Angeles was founded in 1781. The 1820sbuilt plaza was ruled for decades by the magnanimous Judge Agust­n Olvera. Wine Street was renamed in his honor after his 1876 death and took on a back-alley toughness depicted in early Hollywood films. In the 1920s, Christine Sterling campaigned to save the Avila Adobe from demolition and transform Olvera Street into an internationally recognized tourist destination, which opened in 1930. Today the old plaza and Olvera Street shops, restaurants, museums, and vendors draw 1 million people annually under the auspices of El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument.

La Reina de Las Américas

Works of Art from the Museum of the Basílica de Guadalupe

La Reina de Las Américas

Both a religious and a nationally revered cultural symbol, the Virgin of Guadalupe is one of the world's most interesting cultural icons. From the deeply religious who cherish her, to atheists and agnostics who see the Virgin as a symbol of mexicanidad, and to everyone in between, the Virgin is a symbol of deep significance for all Mexicans. This book catalogs an exhibition from the museum of the Basilica de Guadalupe in Mexico City. Paintings -- from formal portraits to anonymous ex votos -- as well as prints, sculptures, and textiles from the eighteenth to the twentieth century are catalogued and analyzed in a bilingual text that addresses both their art historical and their iconographic significance.

Night+Day Los Angeles

Night+Day Los Angeles

This sleek guide emphasizes the details that busy and discerning travelers need to know: the very best venues and activities, the prime time to be in every spot, and packed with insider tips. Structured around styles (such as hot & cool, hip, classic) that make up Los Angeles' unique character, the guide's easy to use format gives travelers a selection based on the city's array of personalities, not geography or price.

Chronicles of Old Los Angeles

Exploring the Devilish History of the City of the Angels

Chronicles of Old Los Angeles

There's more to Los Angeles than lights, camera, action; discover the city yourself with six guided walking/driving tours of LA's historic neighborhoods, illustrated with color photographs and period maps. From the city's early days marked by missionaries, robber barons, orange groves, and oil wells to the invention of the movie camera, Chronicles of Old Los Angeles explains how the Wild West became the Left Coast, and how Alta California became the 31st state. Learn how ethnic waves built Los Angeles—from Native Americans to Spaniards, Latinos, Chinese, Japanese, and all the characters that crowded into California during the Gold Rush—and learn about the gangsters, surfers, architects, and Hollywood pioneers who brought fame to the City of the Angels.

A Companion to Los Angeles

A Companion to Los Angeles

This Companion contains 25 original essays by writers and scholars who present an expert assessment of the best and most important work to date on the complex history of Los Angeles. The first Companion providing a historical survey of Los Angeles, incorporating critical, multi-disciplinary themes and innovative scholarship Features essays from a range of disciplines, including history, political science, cultural studies, and geography Photo essays and ‘contemporary voice’ sections combine with traditional historiographic essays to provide a multi-dimensional view of this vibrant and diverse city Essays cover the key topics in the field within a thematic structure, including demography, social unrest, politics, popular culture, architecture, and urban studies

Missions of Los Angeles

Missions of Los Angeles

After establishing the settlement of San Francisco, visionary mission president Fr. Junipero Serra journeyed south to found Mission San Juan Capistrano, Alta California's seventh, on November 1, 1776. By order of King Carlos III of Spain, El Pueblo de la Reina de los �ngeles (the Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels) was founded on September 4, 1781, following the recommendation of the first California governor, Felipe de Neve. At nearby Mission San Gabriel Arc�ngel, de Neve gathered a group of 11 men, 11 women, and 22 children, soldiers, mission priests, and a few Indians and traveled nine miles to the banks of the Los Angeles River, blessing the new site. By 1800, the city of Los Angeles had a population of 300 with a meeting hall, guardhouse, army barracks, and granary. Built a day's journey apart on El Camino Real, the Mission San Fernando Rey de Espa�a was dedicated on September 8, 1797, and completed the lineage of California's monumental landmark missions near Los Angeles.