Farnsworth's Classical English Rhetoric

Farnsworth's Classical English Rhetoric

Rhetoric is among the most ancient academic disciplines, and we all use it every day whether expertly or not. This book is a lively set of lessons on the subject. It is about rhetorical figures: practical ways of applying old and powerful principles--repetition and variety, suspense and relief, concealment and surprise, the creation of expectations and then the satisfaction or frustration of them--to the composition of a simple sentence or a complete paragraph. --from publisher description.

Farnsworth's Classical English Metaphor

Farnsworth's Classical English Metaphor

Farnsworth’s Classical English Rhetoric was the definitive guide to the use of rhetorical devices in English. It became a best-seller in its field, with over 20,000 copies in print. Here now is the natural sequel, Farnsworth’s Classical English Metaphor—the most entertaining and instructive book ever written about the art of comparison. A metaphor compares two things that seem unalike. Lincoln was a master of the art (A house divided against itself cannot stand). So were Jefferson (The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants) and Shakespeare (All the world’s a stage/And all the men and women merely players). Farnsworth’s book is the finest collection of such figurative comparisons ever assembled. It offers an original analysis of patterns in the sources and uses of metaphor. It also explains the different stylistic ways that comparisons can be written, and with what effects. The book starts by dividing the sources of metaphor into families, including nature, architecture, animals, and myth. It then shows how the best writers have put each of those traditions to distinctive use-for the sake of caricature, to make an abstract idea visible, to make a complicated idea simple. The book provides, along the way, an extraordinarily wide-ranging tour of examples from novelists, playwrights, philosophers, and orators. There is interest, instruction, and amusement to be found on every page. Ward Farnsworth-lawyer, dean, teacher, and polymath-has produced another indispensable book for the writer. Classical English Metaphor will be a constant source of learning and enjoyment for anyone who appreciates the art of observation and the pleasure of well-chosen words.

Farnsworth's Classical English Style

Farnsworth's Classical English Style

From the author of Farnsworth's Classical English Rhetoric, a manual for clear, forceful, unforgettable speech.

A Seven Year Cycle Reading Plan

A Seven Year Cycle Reading Plan

Read through time, enjoying the good, the better, and the best books from each of the seven eras below: Year 1: Ancient History to 476 A.D. Year 2: The Middle Ages, 477 to 1485 A.D. Year 3: The Age of Discovery, 1485-1763 A.D. Year 4: The Age of Revolution, 1764-1848 A.D. Year 5: The Age of Empire, 1849-1914 A.D. Year 6: The American Century, 1915-1995 A.D. Year 7: The Information Age, 1996- Present Day At the end of seven years, repeat! A Seven Year Cycle Reading Plan is a booklist compiled of hundreds of books from each era in history organized into categories of interest. This volume also includes copious room for you to add your own favorite titles!

Eloquence Divine

In Search of God’s Rhetoric

Eloquence Divine

"While serious studies of the Bible's rhetoric have been written for academic readers . . . few have attempted to examine the persuasiveness of speeches directly assigned to the biblical 'God' that so many believe in and worship. . . . Further, no critic has yet tried to analyze how this God tries to invent and develop His arguments in the Bible as it has come down to us, or how this God arranges those arguments, or the styles He adopts to make them, and the roles memory and delivery play in His arguments. . . . Eloquence Divine is one agnostic's attempt at such a study. Those in the humanities, educators and their students, graduates and undergraduates interested in rhetoric, persuasive language, religion, and the Bible are the ones most likely to be interested in this book's explorations . . . in the hope that [these] readers, whatever their beliefs or theoretical preferences, can gain greater understanding of how one, a fairly popular version of God strives through His eloquence to affect the human audiences in the Bible." --From the Introduction

The Practicing Stoic

A Philosophical User's Manual

The Practicing Stoic

At the school of philosophy founded at Athens by Zeno of Citium the teachers believed that virtue, the highest good, is based on knowledge and reason, and encouraged indifference to the vicissitudes of fortune and to pleasure and pain. Farnsworth integrates his own observations with scores of quotations to provide perspective of the various Stoic philosophers. His organization and commentary makes the meaning and relevance of this ancient philosophy clear for our times.

Rhetorical education in America

Rhetorical education in America

The essays in this volume converge to explore the purposes, problems, and possibilities of rhetorical education in America on both the undergraduate and graduate levels and inside and outside the academy. William Denman examines the ancient model of the "citizen-orator" and its value to democratic life. Thomas Miller argues that English departments have embraced a literary-research paradigm and sacrificed the teaching of rhetorical skills for public participation. Susan Kates explores how rhetoric is taught at nontraditional institutions, such as Berea College in Kentucky, where Appalachian dialect is espoused. Nan Johnson looks outside the academy at the parlor movement among women in antebellum America. Michael Halloran examines the rhetorical education provided by historical landmarks, where visitors are encouraged to share a common public discourse. Laura Gurak presents the challenges posed to traditional notions of literacy by the computer, the promises and dangers of internet technology, and the necessity of a critical cyber-literacy for future rhetorical curricula. Collectively, the essays coalesce around timely political and cross-disciplinary issues. Rhetorical Education in America serves to orient scholars and teachers in rhetoric, regardless of their disciplinary home, and help to set an agenda for future classroom practice and curriculum design. Cheryl Glenn is Associate Professor of English at Penn State University and author of Unspoken: A Rhetoric of Silence and Rhetoric Retold: Regendering the Tradition from Antiquity through the Renaissance. Margaret Lyday is Associate Professor of English at Penn State University and author of numerous articles on the rhetoric of narrative in such journals as College Board Review, English Record, and College English. Wendy B. Sharer is Assistant Professor of English at East Carolina University and author of Vote and Voice: Women's Organizations and Political Literacy, 1915-1930.

The Writing Scholar

Studies in Academic Discourse

The Writing Scholar

There is a popular image of academic writing as obscure, convoluted and replete with jargon. Some academic writers conform to this image, while others transform it. Academic discourse is clearly influenced by many factors, conventions and motives. These essays, by internationally-noted researchers and theorists in the field, bring varied insights to bear on the question of what happens, linguistically and psychologically, when academics set out to report facts, explain phenomena, propound hypotheses, argue, persuade and rebut. The contributors look critically at the assumptions and principles underlying academic writing.