Fear Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Voodoo, Vampires, Graveyards & Ghosts of the Crescent City

Fear Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Voodoo, Vampires, Graveyards & Ghosts of the Crescent City

By the author of the acclaimed Eat Dat, a brand-new guide to New Orleans's scary side, from Voodoo rituals to historic cemeteries and haunted mansions Fear Dat New Orleans explores the eccentric and often macabre dark corners of America’s most unique city. In addition to detailed histories of bizarre burials, ghastly murders, and the greatest concentration of haunted places in America, Fear Dat features a “bone watcher’s guide” with useful directions of who’s buried where, from Marie Laveau to Ruthie the Duck Girl. You’ll also find where to buy the most authentic gris-gris or to get the best psychic reading. The Huffington Post tagged Michael Murphy’s first book Eat Dat, about the city’s food culture, the #1 “essential” book to read before coming to New Orleans. New Orleans Living called it “both reverent and irreverent, he manages to bring a sense of humor to serious eating—and that’s what New Orleans is all about.” In Fear Dat, Murphy brings similar insights and irreverence to New Orleans voodoo, vampires, graveyards, and ghosts.

From Flanders Fields to the Moviegoer

Philosophical Foundations for a Transcendent Ethical Framework

From Flanders Fields to the Moviegoer

How do educators, clergy, attorneys, and the concerned public come to terms with meaningful, workable ethics in an age that eschews any attempt to define truth and error? Michael A. Milton has addressed that question in the new monograph, From Flanders Field to the Moviegoer: Philosophical Foundations for a Transcendent Ethical Framework. Milton draws on English literature, sociology, history, public policy, and theology to mark milestones in the cultural journey from the philosophical crisis after World War I, the end of modernity and the introduction of the “theater of the absurd” in post-modernity. Rather than merely a survey, this monograph proposes a “way forward” in teaching metaphysical ethics. Originally given as a paper before American and British defense leaders in Washington, DC, Milton’s original paper is now expanded for use in undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate classrooms, as well as libraries and professional military education.

Spooky New Orleans

Tales of Hauntings, Strange Happenings, and Other Local Lore

Spooky New Orleans

Pull up a chair or gather round the campfire and get ready for creepy tales of ghostly hauntings, eerie happenings, and other strange occurrences under the New Orleans skies. Whether read around the campfire on a dark and stormy night or from the backseat of the family van on the way to grandma's, this is a collection to treasure.

New Orleans Voodoo: A Cultural History

New Orleans Voodoo: A Cultural History

There is no more compelling nor more spiritual city than New Orleans. The city's Roman Catholic roots and its blended French, Spanish, Creole and American Indian populations heavily influenced the rites and rituals that West Africans brought to Louisiana as enslaved laborers. The resulting unique Voodoo tradition is now deeply rooted in the area. Enslaved practitioners in the nineteenth century held Voodoo dances in designated public areas like Congo Square but conducted their secret rituals away from the prying eyes of the city. By 1874, some twelve thousand New Orleanians attended Voodoo queen Marie Laveau's St. John's Eve rites on the shores of Lake Pontchartrain. The Voodoo tradition continues in the Crescent City even today. Rory Schmitt and Rosary O'Neill study the altars, art, history and ceremonies that anchor Voodoo in New Orleans culture.