Feminism Unmodified

Discourses on Life and Law

Feminism Unmodified

An analysis of the legal status of women includes discussions of discrimination, rape, sexual harassment, and pornography

Lawyers' Ethics and the Pursuit of Social Justice

A Critical Reader

Lawyers' Ethics and the Pursuit of Social Justice

Susan D. Carle centers this collection of texts on the premise that legal ethics should be far more than a set of rules on professional responsibility.

On Violence

A Reader

On Violence

DIVAn interdisciplinary collection of primary texts on the subject of violence, from Freud to Gramsci to Foucault, from Ghandi to Osama bin Laden. The editors' introductions frame the texts within questions of how violence is generated and perpetuated in so/div

The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law

Women and Syndrome Evidence

The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law

From a feminist perspective, the authors critically review the current use of psychology in law and identify a powerful collusion between the two fields which works actively against the interests of women. They provide support for their argument in such areas as child abuse, domestic violence, rape and abortion. This groundbreaking international text draws on both research findings and case material from various countries including Australia, New Zealand, Canada and South Africa as well as the USA and Great Britain. The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law brings an innovative, feminist analysis to these affiliated fields. Fiona E. Raitt and M. Suzanne Zeedyk explore the role of psychological syndromes (i.e. Battered Woman's Syndrome, Rape Trauma Syndrome, Pre-menstrual Syndrome and False Memory Syndrome) within the courtrooms of the UK and the US. In addition to the explicit relationship between the two fields, they argue that there is an unrecognised implicit relation existing within the intersection of psychology and law, which they find works to the disadvantage of women. Both novel and controversial and written in an accessible style, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law will engage readers from a wide range of disciplines including: psychology, law, critical theory, criminology and women's studies.

Gender and Law in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East

Gender and Law in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East

This striking new contribution to gender studies demonstrates the essential role of Israelite and Near East law in the historical analysis of gender. The theme of these studies of Babylonian, Hittite, Assyrian, and Israelite law is this: What is the significance of gender in the formulation of ancient law and custom? Feminist scholarship is enriched by these studies in family history and the status of women in antiquity. At the same time, conventional legal history is repositioned, as new and classical texts are interpreted from the vantage point of feminist theory and social history. Papers from SBL Biblical Law Section form the core of this collection.

Unpopular Privacy

What Must We Hide?

Unpopular Privacy

Can the government stick us with privacy we don't want? It can, it does, and according to Anita L. Allen, it may need to do more of it. Privacy is a foundational good, Allen argues, a necessary tool in the liberty-lover's kit for a successful life. A nation committed to personal freedom must be prepared to mandate privacy protections for its people, whether they eagerly embrace them or not. This unique book draws attention to privacies of seclusion, concealment, confidentiality and data-protection undervalued by their intended beneficiaries and targets--and outlines the best reasons for imposing them. Allen looks at laws designed to keep website operators from collecting personal information, laws that force strippers to wear thongs, and the myriad employee and professional confidentiality rules--including insider trading laws--that require strict silence about matters whose disclosure could earn us small fortunes. She shows that such laws recognize the extraordinary importance of dignity, trust and reputation, helping to preserve social, economic and political options throughout a lifetime.

Overcoming Law

Overcoming Law

Legal theory must become more factual and empirical and less conceptual and polemical, Richard Posner argues in this wide-ranging new book. The topics covered include the structure and behavior of the legal profession; constitutional theory; gender, sex, and race theories; interdisciplinary approaches to law; the nature of legal reasoning; and legal pragmatism. Posner analyzes, in witty and passionate prose, schools of thought as different as social constructionism and institutional economics, and scholars and judges as different as Bruce Ackerman, Robert Bork, Ronald Dworkin, Catharine MacKinnon, Richard Rorty, and Patricia Williams. He also engages challenging issues in legal theory that range from the motivations and behavior of judges and the role of rhetoric and analogy in law to the rationale for privacy and blackmail law and the regulation of employment contracts. Although written by a sitting judge, the book does not avoid controversy; it contains frank appraisals of radical feminist and race theories, the behavior of the German and British judiciaries in wartime, and the excesses of social constructionist theories of sexual behavior. Throughout, the book is unified by Posner's distinctive stance, which is pragmatist in philosophy, economic in methodology, and liberal (in the sense of John Stuart Mill's liberalism) in politics. Brilliantly written, eschewing jargon and technicalities, it will make a major contribution to the debate about the role of law in our society.

Law, Gender, and Injustice

A Legal History of U.S. Women

Law, Gender, and Injustice

In this widely acclaimed landmark study, Joan Hoff illustrates how women remain second- class citizens under the current legal system and questions whether the continued pursuit of equality based on a one-size-fits-all vision of traditional individual rights is really what will most improve conditions for women in America as they prepare for the twenty-first century. Concluding that equality based on liberal male ideology is no longer an adequate framework for improving women's legal status, Hoff's highly original and incisive volume calls for a demystification of legal doctrine and a reinterpretation of legal texts (including the Constitution) to create a feminist jurisprudence.

The Problem of the Passions

Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Social Theory

The Problem of the Passions

Women, says conventional wisdom, are warm, nurturing caregivers with an intrinsically enhanced capacity for attachment and compassion. Feminists, says the popular image, are full of rage, devoid of the feelings that are natural to women. How have feminists themselves dealt with this dualism and, more specifically, with the disagreeable passions? What has too often been missing from discussions of women's psychology in social theory is an account of women as ambivalent: both empathic and enraged, loving and hating. The Problem of the Passions fills this void. Examining the work of such feminist theorists as Carol Gilligan, Nancy Chodorow, Jessica Benjamin, and Dorothy Dinnerstein in a new light, Burack argues that feminist social theory can be repaired through attention to the pioneering psychoanalytic work of Melanie Klein. Sure to be of interest to feminists, psychoanalysts, political scientists, and social theorists, The Problem of the Passions is essential reading for anyone concerned with feminism and questions of identity in social thought.