Feminist, Queer, Crip

Feminist, Queer, Crip

In Feminist, Queer, Crip Alison Kafer imagines a different future for disability and disabled bodies. Challenging the ways in which ideas about the future and time have been deployed in the service of compulsory able-bodiedness and able-mindedness, Kafer rejects the idea of disability as a pre-determined limit. She juxtaposes theories, movements, and identities such as environmental justice, reproductive justice, cyborg theory, transgender politics, and disability that are typically discussed in isolation and envisions new possibilities for crip futures and feminist/queer/crip alliances. This bold book goes against the grain of normalization and promotes a political framework for a more just world.

The Philosophy of Sex

Contemporary Readings

The Philosophy of Sex

With twenty-five essays, fourteen of which are new to this edition, this best-selling volume examines the nature, morality, and social meanings of contemporary sexual phenomena. Topics include sexual desire, masturbation, sex on the Internet, homosexuality, transgender and transsexual issues, rape, and promiscuity. New chapters discuss polyamory, transgender issues, queer issues, paraphilia, drugs and sex, objectification, BDSM, cybersex, and sex and race. Updated and new discussion questions offer students starting points for debate in both the classroom and the bedroom.

Sociology Looking at Disability

What Did we Know and When Did we Know it?

Sociology Looking at Disability

The purpose of this volume is to explore existing literature, with an eye towards encouraging scholars not to ask “the same old” questions but to use older writings as a basis for revolutionary and evolutionary thinking. What do the older writings tell us about what questions we should be asking, and what research we should be doing, today?

Shameful Bodies

Religion and the Culture of Physical Improvement

Shameful Bodies

What happens when your body doesn't look how it's supposed to look, or feel how it's supposed to feel, or do what it's supposed to do? Who or what defines the ideals behind these expectations? How can we challenge them and live more peacefully in our bodies? Shameful Bodies: Religion and the Culture of Physical Improvement explores these questions by examining how traditional religious narratives and modern philosophical assumptions come together in the construction and pursuit of a better body in contemporary western societies. Drawing on examples from popular culture such as self-help books, magazines, and advertisements, Michelle Mary Lelwica shows how these narratives and assumptions encourage us to go to war against our bodies-to fight fat, triumph over disability, conquer chronic pain and illness, and defy aging. Through an ethic of conquest and conformity, the culture of physical improvement trains us not only to believe that all bodily processes are under our control, but to feel ashamed about those parts of our flesh that refuse to comply with the cultural ideal. Lelwica argues that such shame is not a natural response to being fat, physically impaired, chronically sick, or old. Rather, body shame is a religiously and culturally conditioned reaction to a commercially-fabricated fantasy of physical perfection. While Shameful Bodies critiques the religious and cultural norms and narratives that perpetuate external and internalized judgment and aggression toward “shameful” bodies, it also engages the resources of religions, especially feminist theologies and Buddhist thought/practice, to construct a more affirming approach to health and healing-an approach that affirms the diversity, fragility, interdependence, and impermanence of embodied life.

Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth

Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth

Leading feminist scholars and activists as well as new voices introduce and explore themes central to contemporary ecofeminism. Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth first offers an historical, grounding overview that situates ecofeminist theory and activism and provides a timeline for important publications and events. This is followed by contributions from leading theorists and activists on how our emotions and embodiment can and must inform our relationships with the more than human world. In the final section, the contributors explore the complexities of appreciating difference and the possibilities of living less violently. Throughout the book, the authors engage with intersections of gender and gender non-conformity, race, sexuality, disability, and species. The result is a new up-to-date resource for students and teachers of animal studies, environmental studies, feminist/gender studies, and practical ethics.

Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama

Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama

The book from the interdisciplinary fields of queer theory, critical race theory, feminist political theory, disability studies, and indigenous studies to demonstrate that analyzing contemporary notions of citizenship requires understanding the machinations of governmentality and biopolitics in the (re)production of the proper citizen.

Medical Entanglements

Rethinking Feminist Debates about Healthcare

Medical Entanglements

Medical Entanglements uses intersectional feminist, queer, and crip theory to move beyond “for or against” approaches to medical intervention. Using a series of case studies – sex-confirmation surgery, pharmaceutical treatments for sexual dissatisfaction, and weight loss interventions – the book argues that, because of systemic inequality, most mainstream medical interventions will simultaneously reinforce social inequality and alleviate some individual suffering. The book demonstrates that there is no way to think ourselves out of this conundrum as the contradictions are a product of unjust systems. Thus, Gupta argues that feminist activists and theorists should allow individuals to choose whether to use a particular intervention, while directing their social justice efforts at dismantling systems of oppression and at ensuring that all people, regardless of race, gender, sexuality, class, or ability, have access to the basic resources required to flourish.

Crip Theory

Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability

Crip Theory

Crip Theory attends to the contemporary cultures of disability and queerness that are coming out all over. Both disability studies and queer theory are centrally concerned with how bodies, pleasures, and identities are represented as “normal” or as abject, but Crip Theory is the first book to analyze thoroughly the ways in which these interdisciplinary fields inform each other. Drawing on feminist theory, African American and Latino/a cultural theories, composition studies, film and television studies, and theories of globalization and counter-globalization, Robert McRuer articulates the central concerns of crip theory and considers how such a critical perspective might impact cultural and historical inquiry in the humanities. Crip Theory puts forward readings of the Sharon Kowalski story, the performance art of Bob Flanagan, and the journals of Gary Fisher, as well as critiques of the domesticated queerness and disability marketed by the Millennium March, or Bravo TV’s Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. McRuer examines how dominant and marginal bodily and sexual identities are composed, and considers the vibrant ways that disability and queerness unsettle and re-write those identities in order to insist that another world is possible.

Queer Postcolonial Narratives and the Ethics of Witnessing

Queer Postcolonial Narratives and the Ethics of Witnessing

Queer Postcolonial Narratives and the Ethics of Witnessing is a critical study of the relationship between bodies, memories and communal witnessing. With a focus on the aesthetics and politics of queer postcolonial narratives, this book examines how unspeakable traumas of colonial and familial violence are communicated through the body. Exploring multisensory epistemologies as queer and anti-colonial acts of resistance, McCormack offers an original engagement with collective and public forms of bearing witness that may emerge in response to institutionalized violence. Intergenerational, communal and fragmented narratives are central to this analysis of ethics, witnessing, and embodied memories. Queer Postcolonial Narratives and the Ethics of Witnessing is the first text to offer a sustained analysis of Judith Butler's and Homi Bhabha's intersecting theories of performativity, and to draw out the centrality of witnessing to the performative structure of power. It moves through queer, postcolonial, disability and trauma studies to explore how the repetition of familial violence – throughout multiple generations –may be lessened through an embodied witnessing that is simultaneously painful, disturbing and filled with pleasure. Its focus is selected literary texts by Shani Mootoo, Tahar Ben Jelloun and Ann-Marie MacDonald, and it situates this literary analysis in the colonial histories of Trinidad, Morocco and Canada.

Qed, a Journal in Glbtq Worldmaking

Qed, a Journal in Glbtq Worldmaking

IN THIS ISSUE Editorial Introduction Thomas K. Nakayama, Charles E. Morris III, "Worldmaking and Everyday Interventions" Essays Raechel Tiffe, "Interrogating Industries of Violence: Queering the Labor Movement to Challenge Police Brutality and the Prison Industrial Complex" Camille Holthaus, "The Future of Bisexual Activism" Jonathan Alexander, "Narrating Sexual Compulsion: Gay Male Writing Beyond Shame" Jaime Woo, "Grindr: Part of a Complete Breakfast" Justin N. Thorpe, Adam J. Greteman, "Intimately Bound to Numbers: On the Rhetorics of GLBTQ School Climate Research" Queer Conversation Kathleen E. Feyh, LGBTQ Oppression and Activism in Russia: An Interview with Igor Iasine Queer Performance and Performativities Bryant Keith Alexander, "Introduction: Performative Rhetorics of Desire, Resistance, and Possibility" Kimberlee Pérez, "You Can Get Anything You Want" Tim Miller, "Lay of the Land" Book Reviews Jason Edward Black and Charles E. Morris III, eds., An Archive of Hope: Harvey Milk's Speeches and Writings, reviewed by Maegan Parker Brooks Alison Kafer, Feminist, Queer, Crip, reviewed by Julie Passanante Elman Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, The End of San Francisco, reviewed by Colin Gillis Lucas Hilderbrand, Paris Is Burning: A Queer Film Classic, reviewed by Ryan James Gliszinski Julia Serano, Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive, reviewed by Caleb J. Green Mel Y. Chen, Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect, reviewed by Shawna Lipton Dennis Altman, The End of the Homosexual? reviewed by John Whittier Treat