Ford Differentials

How to Rebuild the 8.8 and 9 Inch

Ford Differentials

The Ford 8.8- and 9-inch rear differentials are two of the most popular and best-performing differentials on the market. While the 8.8-inch differential is commonly used in late-model Mustangs, the 9-inch is the more popular and arguably the most dominant high-performance differential for muscle cars, hot rods, custom vehicles, and race cars. Built from 1957 to 1986, the 9-inch Ford differential is used in a huge range of high-performance Ford and non-Ford vehicles because of its rugged construction, easy-to-set-up design, and large aftermarket support. The 9-inch differential effectively transmits power to the ground for many classic Fords and hot rods of all types, but it is the choice of many GM muscle car owners and racers as well. These differentials have been used extensively and proven their mettle in racing and high-performance applications. The Ford 8.8- and 9-inch must be rebuilt after extensive use and need a variety of different ratios for top performance and special applications. This Workbench book provides detailed step-by-step photos and information for rebuilding the differentials with the best equipment, installing the gear sets, and converting to Posi-Traction for a variety of applications. It describes how to disassemble the rear end, identify worn ring and pinion gears, other damage or wear, and shows step-by-step rebuilding of the differential. It also explains how to select the right differential hardware, bearings, seals, and other parts, as well as how to set ring and pinion backlash so that the rear end operates at peak efficiency. Aftermarket 9-inch performance differentials from manufacturers including Currie, Moser and Strange are reviewed and you learn how to rebuild and set up these high-performance aftermarket differentials. In addition, this book provides a comprehensive identification chart to ensure readers properly identify the model and specifics of the 9-inch differential. Chapters include axle identification, inspection, and purchasing axles for rebuilding; differential tear down; ring and pinion gear removal; inspection and reassembly; drive axle choices; and more.

Jeep, Dana and Chrysler Differentials

How to Rebuild the 8-1/4, 8-3/4, Dana 44 and 60 and AMC 20

Jeep, Dana and Chrysler Differentials

Over the last 40 years, millions of Chrysler, AMC, and Jeep vehicles have used these differentials, propelling these high-performance vehicles to victory on the street, in drag racing, and other applications. Chrysler used the Dana 60 and BorgWarner Sure-Grip high-performance differentials in the Challenger, Charger, Barracuda, Super Bee and many other renowned Chrysler muscle cars. These differentials have been tied to historic powerhouse engines, such as the Chrysler Magnum and Hemi V8s in stock car, drag racing, and other forms of racing, making history in the process. Jeep CJs and Cherokees have used the Dana 44 and AMC 20 and put these differentials under tremendous loads, which often requires frequent rebuilds. After years of use, these differentials require rebuilding, and of course aftermarket suppliers offer ring and pinion and other parts to upgrade these axles. In this Workbench series title, the focus is on the disassembly, inspection and step-by-step rebuild of the most popular high-performance differentials. Axles and differentials are not incredibly complex components, but there are some specific steps to follow for rebuilding, upgrading, and setting them up properly, and this book demystifies the process and explains it in detail. A book dedicated to the Dana, Sure-Grip, and AMC Jeep axles has never been published before, and Mopar, Jeep and AMC enthusiasts are hungry for this information. The Dana and AMC axles should remain in wide use into the foreseeable future, and therefore there will be a consistent demand for this information. This book will also feature extensive gear and application charts, so the reader is sure to select the correct gear ratio for a particular vehicle and application. Special coverage is therefore dedicated to ring and pinion gears. In addition selecting the best aftermarket and production axle shafts is covered as well as modifying and upgrading the differential housings.

Chevy Differentials

How to Rebuild the 10- and 12-Bolt

Chevy Differentials

Millions of Chevrolet vehicles were built and sold in the 1960s and 1970s, and the great majority of those were rear-wheel-drive models with differentials known as 10-bolts or 12-bolts. High-performance limited-slip versions of these differentials also have been installed in Camaros, Chevelles, Corvettes, and many other GM muscle cars from 1964 through the 1970s, as well as Chevy and GMC trucks. If you have owned a GM performance car from the 1960s or 1970s, you have owned one of these sturdy, reliable, and versatile differentials. Many of these differentials are now more than 50 years old and are due for an overhaul. In Chevy Differentials: How to Rebuild the 10- and 12-Bolt, author Jefferson Bryant walks you through the entire process of procuring, evaluating, and rebuilding the perfect differential for your GM application. In this step-by-step guide, you learn how to completely disassemble the differential, evaluate components, and select replacement parts. You're also shown all of the up-to-date techniques for re-assembling the differential and axle. Informative sections on axle identification and replacement parts are also provided. Maybe you have found a salvage-yard unit and want to rebuild it to upgrade your existing vehicle. Maybe you would like to install an aftermarket 12-bolt assembly for extreme performance or racing. This is the only book dedicated solely to rebuilding, setting up, and modifying these axle assemblies for long service life and maximum performance. If you’re going to rebuild a Chevy 10- or 12-bolt axle, this book delivers the essential information to get the job done right.

Detroit Speed's How to Build a Pro Touring Car

Detroit Speed's How to Build a Pro Touring Car

Trends in automotive modification come and go, some outlandish, some practical. Currently, the trend called "Pro Touring," while expensive, definitely leans toward the practical. Originally a term coined for GM cars, the term Pro Touring has come to mean a style of all cars, and many eras. Pro Touring is essentially the art of adding modern technology to aged designs, creating cars that stop, start, handle, drive, and behave just as modern performance cars do. You can do this in many ways and choose from many suppliers. Detroit Speed is at the forefront of the Pro Touring movement. Both a parts manufacturer and car builder, the company is in a unique position not only to design and manufacture parts, but to build cars and test the parts for their effectiveness on the street and track. Kyle and Stacy Tucker have put their considerable skill in engineering and market savvy to create a unique company to lead the Pro Touring movement. Not only do you learn about the history of the company and how they design their performance parts, install sections cover front sub-frame assemblies, rear suspension assemblies, wheel tubs, fuel system upgrades, brake upgrades, driveline upgrades including an LS swap, cooling system upgrades, and more. The featured cars are customer builds as well as DSE test cars, which include a host of different Chevrolet products, a 1966 Mustang and a 1969 Charger. Detroit Speed’s How to Build a Pro Touring Car is a vital edition to every performance enthusiast’s library.

High-Performance Differentials, Axels, and Drivelines

High-Performance Differentials, Axels, and Drivelines

Covers everything you need to know about selecting the most desirable gear ratio, rebuilding differentials and other driveline components, and most importantly, matching the correct driveline components to engine power output.

Autodriver

Autodriver


Ford Tempo and Mercury Topaz

Automotive Repair Manual

Ford Tempo and Mercury Topaz


Chilton Book Company Repair Manual

All U.S. and Canadian Models of E-100, E-150, E-200, E-250, E-300, E-350 Vans and Club Wagons, Including Diesel Engines. Ford vans, 1961 to 1988

Chilton Book Company Repair Manual

Chilton's original line of model-specific information covers older vehicles. Each manual offers repair and tune-up guidance designed for the weekend for the weekend mechanic, covering basic maintenance and troubleshooting. For the hobbyist or used car owner, this information is essential and unavailable elsewhere.