From Babylon To Timbuktu

Author: Rudolph R. Windsor
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 1463411294
Size: 47.68 MB
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Until comparatively recent times, knowledge that black Africa was the seat of highly evolved civilizations and cultures during a time when Europe stagnated was limited to a small group of scholars. That great empires such as Ghana, and later, Mali flourished for centuries while Europe slept through its dark ages almost has been ignored by historians. Thousands of years before that, as Rudolph R. Windsor notes in this enlightening book, civilizations began with the black races of Africa and Asia, including the Hebrews, who in Biblical times were jet black. Then, western Europe had no nations as such, and its stone age inhabitants had but the crudest tools and lived in caves.Because of the scarce literature on the contributions of blacks to world civilizations, most people today hold the erroneous opinion that the black races have little real history. It was not known, for instance, that the ancient Hebrews, Mesopotamians, Phoenicians, and Egyptians were black. Now, a growing body of literature is presenting the illustrious history of the blacks and their enormous contributions.This carefully researched book is a significant addition to this vital field of knowledge. It sets forth in fascinating detail the history, from earliest recorded times, of the black races of the Middle East and Africa. Dr. Windsor's discussion of Islamic civilization and the movement of the black Hebrew to all parts of Africa is edifying and absorbing. Readers, regardless to race, will find this factual story of a noble heritage a valuable enrichment to their knowledge of world history.

From Babylon To Timbuktu

Author: Rudolph R. Windsor
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781684113507
Size: 44.13 MB
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This carefully reserched book is a significant addition to this vital foeld of knowledge. It sets forth, in fascinating detail, the history, from earliset recorded times, of the black races of the Middle East and Africa.

Race And Religion Among The Chosen People Of Crown Heights

Author: Henry Goldschmidt
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813544270
Size: 15.23 MB
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In August of 1991, the Brooklyn neighborhood of Crown Heights was engulfed in violence following the deaths of Gavin Cato and Yankel Rosenbaum—a West Indian boy struck by a car in the motorcade of a Hasidic spiritual leader and an orthodox Jew stabbed by a Black teenager. The ensuing unrest thrust the tensions between the Lubavitch Hasidic community and their Afro-Caribbean and African American neighbors into the media spotlight, spurring local and national debates on diversity and multiculturalism. Crown Heights became a symbol of racial and religious division. Yet few have paused to examine the nature of Black-Jewish difference in Crown Heights, or to question the flawed assumptions about race and religion that shape the politics—and perceptions—of conflict in the community. In Race and Religion among the Chosen Peoples of Crown Heights, Henry Goldschmidt explores the everyday realities of difference in Crown Heights. Drawing on two years of fieldwork and interviews, he argues that identity formation is particularly complex in Crown Heights because the neighborhood’s communities envision the conflict in remarkably diverse ways. Lubavitch Hasidic Jews tend to describe it as a religious difference between Jews and Gentiles, while their Afro-Caribbean and African American neighbors usually define it as a racial difference between Blacks and Whites. These tangled definitions are further complicated by government agencies who address the issue as a matter of culture, and by the Lubavitch Hasidic belief—a belief shared with a surprising number of their neighbors—that they are a “chosen people” whose identity transcends the constraints of the social world. The efforts of the Lub­avitch Hasidic community to live as a divinely chosen people in a diverse Brooklyn neighbor­hood where collective identi­ties are generally defined in terms of race illuminate the limits of American multiculturalism—a concept that claims to celebrate diversity, yet only accommodates variations of certain kinds. Taking the history of conflict in Crown Heights as an invitation to reimagine our shared social world, Goldschmidt interrogates the boundaries of race and religion and works to create space in American society for radical forms of cultural difference.

The Black Hebrews And The Black Christ

Author: Aylmer Von Fleischer
Publisher: Aylmer von Fleischer
ISBN:
Size: 37.52 MB
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[Dedicated to the One and only God from whom all blessings flow]. This updated book tells it all – from the creation of Adam, to Black Abraham, Moses, Jacob, the invasion of the homelands of the Black Hebrew Israelites/Jews by the Assyrians, Neo-Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Muslims and others; the brutalization of the Black Jews and their near-decimation, as well as the story of the Khazars, who are today considered to be the real Jews. Mention is also made of the historical Black Jesus. This book is illustrated with ancient images of Biblical characters.

History In Black

Author: Jacob Shavit
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780714650623
Size: 30.53 MB
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The development of Afrocentric historical writing is explored in this study which traces this recording of history from the Hellenistic-Roman period to the 19th century. Afrocentric writers are depicted as searching for the unique primary source of "culture" from one period to the next. Such passing on of cultural traits from the "ancient model" from the classical period to the origin of culture in Egypt and Africa is shown as being a product purely of creative history.

The Soul Of Judaism

Author: Bruce D. Haynes
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479811238
Size: 59.75 MB
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A glimpse into the diverse stories of Black Jews in the United States What makes a Jew? This book traces the history of Jews of African descent in America and the counter-narratives they have put forward as they stake their claims to Jewishness. The Soul of Judaism offers the first exploration of the full diversity of Black Jews, including bi-racial Jews of both matrilineal and patrilineal descent; adoptees; black converts to Judaism; and Black Hebrews and Israelites, who trace their Jewish roots to Africa and challenge the dominant western paradigm of Jews as white and of European descent. Blending historical analysis and oral history, Haynes showcases the lives of Black Jews within the Orthodox, Conservative, Reconstruction and Reform movements, as well as the religious approaches that push the boundaries of the common forms of Judaism we know today. He illuminates how in the quest to claim whiteness, American Jews of European descent gained the freedom to express their identity fluidly while African Americans have continued to be seen as a fixed racial group. This book demonstrates that racial ascription has been shaping Jewish selfhood for centuries. Pushing us to reassess the boundaries between race and ethnicity, it offers insight into how Black Jewish individuals strive to assert their dual identities and find acceptance within their respective communities. Putting to rest the simplistic notion that Jews are white and that Black Jews are therefore a contradiction, the volume argues that we can no longer pigeonhole Black Hebrews and Israelites as exotic, militant, and nationalistic sects outside the boundaries of mainstream Jewish thought and community life. The volume spurs us to consider the significance of the growing population of self-identified Black Jews and its implications for the future of American Jewry.