Girl In Translation

Author: Jean Kwok
Publisher: Riverhead Trade (Paperbacks)
ISBN: 9781594485152
Size: 30.52 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2557
Download
Emigrating with her mother from Hong Kong to Brooklyn, Kimberly begins a double life as a schoolgirl by day and sweatshop worker at night, an existence also marked by her first crush and the pressure to save her family from poverty.

Modern Selfhood In Translation

Author: Limin Chi
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9811311560
Size: 28.33 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4108
Download
This book examines the development of Chinese translation practice in relation to the rise of ideas of modern selfhood in China from the 1890s to the 1920s. The key translations produced by late Qing and early Republican Chinese intellectuals over the three decades in question reflect a preoccupation with new personality ideals informed by foreign models and the healthy development of modern individuality, in the face of crises compounded by feelings of cultural inadequacy. The book clarifies how these translated works supplied the meanings for new terms and concepts that signify modern human experience, and sheds light on the ways in which they taught readers to internalize the idea of the modern as personal experience. Through their selection of source texts and their adoption of different translation strategies, the translators chosen as case studies championed a progressive view of the world: one that was open-minded and humanistic. The late Qing construction of modern Chinese identity, instigated under the imperative of national salvation in the aftermath of the First Sino-Japanese War, wielded a far-reaching influence on the New Culture discourse. This book argues that the New Culture translations, being largely explorations of modern self-consciousness, helped to produce an egalitarian cosmopolitan view of modern being. This was a view favoured by the majority of mainland intellectuals in the post-Maoist 1980s and which has since become an important topic in mainland scholarship.

In Translation

Author: Esther Allen
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231535023
Size: 38.55 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3345
Download
The most comprehensive collection of perspectives on translation to date, this anthology features essays by some of the world's most skillful writers and translators, including Haruki Murakami, Alice Kaplan, Peter Cole, Eliot Weinberger, Forrest Gander, Clare Cavanagh, David Bellos, and José Manuel Prieto. Discussing the process and possibilities of their art, they cast translation as a fine balance between scholarly and creative expression. The volume provides students and professionals with much-needed guidance on technique and style, while affirming for all readers the cultural, political, and aesthetic relevance of translation. These essays focus on a diverse group of languages, including Japanese, Turkish, Arabic, and Hindi, as well as frequently encountered European languages, such as French, Spanish, Italian, German, Polish, and Russian. Contributors speak on craft, aesthetic choices, theoretical approaches, and the politics of global cultural exchange, touching on the concerns and challenges that currently affect translators working in an era of globalization. Responding to the growing popularity of translation programs, literature in translation, and the increasing need to cultivate versatile practitioners, this anthology serves as a definitive resource for those seeking a modern understanding of the craft.

Girl Reading Girl In Japan

Author: Tomoko Aoyama
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135247951
Size: 22.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1743
Download
Girl Reading Girl provides the first overview of the cultural significance of girls and reading in modern and contemporary Japan with emphasis on the processes involved when girls read about other girls. The collection examines the reading practices of real life girls from differing social backgrounds throughout the twentieth century while a number of chapters also consider how fictional girls read attention is given to the diverse cultural representations of the girl, or shôjo, who are the objects of the reading desires of Japan’s real life and fictional girls. These representations appear in various genres, including prose fiction, such as Yoshiya Nobuko’s Flower Stories and Takemoto Nobara’s Kamikaze Girls, and manga, such as Yoshida Akimi’s The Cherry Orchard. This volume presents the work of pioneering women scholars in the field of girl studies including translations of a ground-breaking essay by Honda Masuko on reading girls and Kawasaki Kenko’s response to prejudicial masculine critiques of best-selling novelist, Yoshimoto Banana. Other topics range from the reception of Anne of Green Gables in Japan to girls who write and read male homoerotic narratives.

Voices In Translation

Author: Gunilla M. Anderman
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1853599824
Size: 10.17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 479
Download
This volume includes contributions on dialect translation as well as other studies concerned with the problems facing the translator in bridging cultural divides.

Indonesian Writing In Translation

Author: John M. Echols
Publisher: Equinox Publishing
ISBN: 6028397032
Size: 59.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3792
Download
This compilation of translations of modern Indonesian literature originated as a series of class exercises performed by some of my students at Cornell University as a part of the advanced Indonesian language class during the years 1952-1955. The selections have now been compiled primarily for use in a course on Southeast Asian Literature in Translation, in an attempt to overcome, to some extent, the lack of available material. These are presented herewith in the hope that they may also be of interest to others concerned with, or interested in, comparative or Far Eastern literature. In addition to the selections translated by these students, several poems which Messrs. Burton Raffel and Nurdin Salam kindly sent me from Makassar have been included together with two translations by Professor Harry J. Benda of the University of Rochester. Indonesian literature since 1917 has indeed been a terra incognita for several reasons, two of the most obvious being the inaccessibility of the material and the language barrier. Both of these are very slowly but gradually being broken down, as a glance at James S. Holmes' Angkatan Muda, A Checklist of Writings in Western Language Translations in Indonesie 5, pp. 462-72, will reveal. It is my hope that this anthology will assist in dispelling some of the ignorance which now inevitably prevails concerning modern Indonesian literature. With the appearance in June of the Atlantic supplement, Perspective of Indonesia further opportunity will be given Americans and others to become acquainted with a sample of the literature of this area. In preparing this anthology I have often been reminded of a story, probably apocryphal, related about Einstein who, shortly after his arrival in this country, was asked to say a few words and replied that he would try to speak in English but if by chance he should slip back into German, Dr. Lindemann would 'traduce' him. I sincerely hope that none of the writers represented in this compilation has been traduced. I cannot conclude without acknowledging the assistance of Idrus Nazir Djajadiningrat and Hassan Shadily in carefully checking many of the translations and of Mrs. Tazu Warner, secretary in the Department of Far Eastern Studies at Cornell University, who performed an excellent job of typing the mats for reproduction and assisted in numerous other ways. Finally I wish to express my appreciation to the Djakarta publishing houses, Balai Pustaka (Perpustakaan Perguruan Kementerian - P.P.&K.) and Pustaka Rakjat for granting permission to reproduce these translations of their publications. - John M. Echols

Mad In Translation

Author: Robin D. Gill
Publisher: Paraverse Press
ISBN: 0974261874
Size: 77.59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1054
Download
This is the first book to translate a broad spectrum of the informal, improper and generally comic side of 31-syllable Japanese poetry called 'kyoka, ' or 'kyouka, ' literally, "mad-poems" or "madcap verse," representing in the words of Aston (1899), "absolute freedom both in respect of language and choice of subject." Literary anthologies have only translated a handful of kyoka to date, and the sole exception, recent catalogues of the color prints called 'surimono, ' stick to the rather tame kyoka of the early 19c that accompany the prints. The 2000 poems in Robin D. Gill's 740-page book include hundreds of "wild waka" ('waka' being the formal side of 31-syllable poetry) to help define the field and demonstrate how humors presence or absence depends upon our expectations and, in the case of an exotic tongue, our translation. "Mad In Translation" re-creates the wit of the originals in English on the one hand, while explaining what requires Japanese on the other. Many poems will delight those who appreciate the best of the Metaphysical Poets, the grooks of Piet Hein and all that might be called 'light verse for egg-heads.' Because of the narrow focus of most work published on kyoka in Japan, even specialists in Japanese literature may be surprised to discover in this book a brave old world of humor far larger and more entertaining than they might have imagined.

Medieval Literature In Translation

Author: Charles W. Jones
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486149048
Size: 80.50 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5121
Download
Comprehensive anthology contains exquisite cross-section of Western medieval literature, from Boethius and Augustine to Dante, Abelard, Marco Polo, and Villon, in masterful translations. "No better anthology exists." — Commonweal.

Lost In Translation

Author: Homay King
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392925
Size: 23.58 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4877
Download
In a nuanced exploration of how Western cinema has represented East Asia as a space of radical indecipherability, Homay King traces the long-standing association of the Orient with the enigmatic. The fantasy of an inscrutable East, she argues, is not merely a side note to film history, but rather a kernel of otherness that has shaped Hollywood cinema at its core. Through close readings of The Lady from Shanghai, Chinatown, Blade Runner, Lost in Translation, and other films, she develops a theory of the “Shanghai gesture,” a trope whereby orientalist curios and décor become saturated with mystery. These objects and signs come to bear the burden of explanation for riddles that escape the Western protagonist or cannot be otherwise resolved by the plot. Turning to visual texts from outside Hollywood which actively grapple with the association of the East and the unintelligible—such as Michelangelo Antonioni’s Chung Kuo: Cina, Wim Wenders’s Notebook on Cities and Clothes, and Sophie Calle’s Exquisite Pain—King suggests alternatives to the paranoid logic of the Shanghai gesture. She argues for the development of a process of cultural “de-translation” aimed at both untangling the psychic enigmas prompting the initial desire to separate the familiar from the foreign, and heightening attentiveness to the internal alterities underlying Western subjectivity.