Going Gone

Going Gone

When his engagement to Laura Doyle is marred by a serial killer called the Stormchaser, who pairs random acts of God with deliberate acts of evil, FBI agent Cameron Winger must stop this twisted psychopath who is determined to take from him the one thing he loves most—Laura. Original.

Wild Hearts

Wild Hearts

www.SharonSala.net Past Sins Cast a Long Shadow Dallas Phillips refuses to believe her father committed suicide, even though things were tough on his farm and he was deeply in debt. When she hears he'd told a neighbor about an upcoming windfall, she grows suspicious, and her suspicion only deepens when she realizes someone is lurking in the nearby mountains after dark. For help, she turns to Trey Jakes, local police chief—and her former lover. As they begin to investigate, another mystery comes to light. Trey's mother is beginning to remember events from thirty years ago, something shadowy that happened in the mountains, and Dallas's father was there, too. Is what happened that night connected to his "suicide"? As they search for the truth, Trey and Dallas struggle to fight their attraction, but they may not be able to fend off another force—a killer who's more than willing to kill again to make sure old secrets stay buried.

The Merging of Two Worlds

The Convergence of Scientific and Religious Thought

The Merging of Two Worlds

SCIENCE is a left-brained subject. It sees the world in mathematical models. It is all built on logic. RELIGION is a right-brained subject. It sees the world in associations. It is all built on symbolism. Misconceptions are what prevent us from reconciling the associations with the mathematical models. Once the misconceptions are revealed, the problem goes away. The teachings of Eastern Philosophy are interwoven throughout the Old and New Testaments. What they have to say explains a great deal about what the Holy Bible is trying to say to us. It reveals much of the symbolism used in religion so that it can be understood. It takes you beyond the realm of faith and into the realm of knowing. The Mayan Calendar and its apparent connection to end-time prophecy is also reviewed. The evolution of consciousness that it reveals is leading us on a very definite path. Taken collectively, evolution, split brain, Eastern Philosophy, Christianity, and the Mayan Calendar are interwoven to present a worldview that is equally fascinating and very promising.

Book Review Digest

Book Review Digest

Excerpts from and citations to reviews of more than 8,000 books each year, drawn from coverage of 109 publications. Book Review Digest provides citations to and excerpts of reviews of current juvenile and adult fiction and nonfiction in the English language. Reviews of the following types of books are excluded: government publications, textbooks, and technical books in the sciences and law. Reviews of books on science for the general reader, however, are included. The reviews originate in a group of selected periodicals in the humanities, social sciences, and general science published in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. - Publisher.

The Edge of Nowhere

The Edge of Nowhere

The Edgar and Agatha Award-nominated novel from #1 New York Times bestseller Elizabeth George! On Whidbey Island, nothing is as it seems. Becca's ability to hear "whispers"—the thoughts of others—has put her at risk from her criminal stepfather. So Becca escapes to Whidbey Island, where she hopes to find safety. But when a terrible accident affects everyone on the island, Becca finds herself wrapped up in a complicated situation, and she isn't the only one with a secret. This compelling coming-of-age story, the first of an ongoing sequence of books set on Whidbey Island, has elements of mystery, the paranormal, and romance. "Blending mystery, family drama, teen angst and a dose of paranormal, this novel rises above many in the young adult genre." —USATODAY.com "George has hit the nail on the proverbial head with this action-packed, mysterious, and somewhat 'creepy' novel." —Suspense Magazine An Edgar Award Nominee An Agatha Award Nominee From the Trade Paperback edition.

Philosophy of Technology

Practical, Historical and Other Dimensions

Philosophy of Technology

The corps of philosophers who make up the Society for Philosophy & Technology has now been collaborating, in one fashion or another, for almost fifteen years. In addition, the number of philosophers, world-wide, who have begun to focus their analytical skills on technology and related social problems grows increasingly every year. {It would certainly swell the ranks if all of them joined the Society!) It seems more than ap propriate, in this context, to publish a miscellaneous volume that em phasizes the extraordinary range and diversity of contemporary contribu tions to the philosophical understanding of the exceedingly complex phenomenon that is modern technology. My thanks, once again, to the anonymous referees who do so much to maintain standards for the series. And thanks also to the secretaries - Mary Imperatore and Dorothy Milsom - in the Philosophy Department at the University of Delaware; their typing and retyping of the MSS, and especially notes and references, also contributes to keeping our standards high. PAUL T. DURBIN vii Paul T. Durbin (ed.), Philosophy ofT echnology, p. vii.

Alien in My Pocket #6: Forces of Nature

Alien in My Pocket #6: Forces of Nature

Zack and Amp get a serious surprise in Forces of Nature, the sixth installment of this fun intergalactic chapter book series by Nate Ball, the host of PBS’s Design Squad and Design Squad Nation. Ever since Amp crash-landed his spaceship through Zack McGee’s window, Zack’s life has gone in some unexpected directions. But when everything goes wrong on the McGee family camping trip, Zack’s going to need Amp’s alien scouting skills to navigate the great outdoors and find their way back to civilization! Like every book in the Alien in My Pocket series, Forces of Nature mixes Common Core–aligned science with safe, hands-on experiments that young readers will love. This installment includes a build-your-own compass experiment. Publishers Weekly said of Alien in My Pocket: Blast Off!: “With its screwball comedy and lively dialogue, the novel gives readers the opportunity to laugh as they learn.”

The New Biographical Dictionary of Film

Sixth Edition

The New Biographical Dictionary of Film

For almost thirty years, David Thomson’s Biographical Dictionary of Film has been not merely “the finest reference book ever written about movies” (Graham Fuller, Interview), not merely the “desert island book” of art critic David Sylvester, not merely “a great, crazy masterpiece” (Geoff Dyer, The Guardian), but also “fiendishly seductive” (Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone). This new edition updates the older entries and adds 30 new ones: Darren Aronofsky, Emmanuelle Beart, Jerry Bruckheimer, Larry Clark, Jennifer Connelly, Chris Cooper, Sofia Coppola, Alfonso Cuaron, Richard Curtis, Sir Richard Eyre, Sir Michael Gambon, Christopher Guest, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Spike Jonze, Wong Kar-Wai, Laura Linney, Tobey Maguire, Michael Moore, Samantha Morton, Mike Myers, Christopher Nolan, Dennis Price, Adam Sandler, Kevin Smith, Kiefer Sutherland, Charlize Theron, Larry Wachowski and Andy Wachowski, Lew Wasserman, Naomi Watts, and Ray Winstone. In all, the book includes more than 1300 entries, some of them just a pungent paragraph, some of them several thousand words long. In addition to the new “musts,” Thomson has added key figures from film history–lively anatomies of Graham Greene, Eddie Cantor, Pauline Kael, Abbott and Costello, Noël Coward, Hoagy Carmichael, Dorothy Gish, Rin Tin Tin, and more. Here is a great, rare book, one that encompasses the chaos of art, entertainment, money, vulgarity, and nonsense that we call the movies. Personal, opinionated, funny, daring, provocative, and passionate, it is the one book that every filmmaker and film buff must own. Time Out named it one of the ten best books of the 1990s. Gavin Lambert recognized it as “a work of imagination in its own right.” Now better than ever–a masterwork by the man playwright David Hare called “the most stimulating and thoughtful film critic now writing.”