Good Morning, Midnight

A Novel

Good Morning, Midnight

For readers of Station Eleven and The Snow Child, Lily Brooks-Dalton’s haunting debut is the unforgettable story of two outsiders—a lonely scientist in the Arctic and an astronaut trying to return to Earth—as they grapple with love, regret, and survival in a world transformed. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY SHELF AWARENESS AND THE CHICAGO REVIEW OF BOOKS • COLSON WHITEHEAD'S FAVORITE BOOK OF 2016 (Esquire) Augustine, a brilliant, aging astronomer, is consumed by the stars. For years he has lived in remote outposts, studying the sky for evidence of how the universe began. At his latest posting, in a research center in the Arctic, news of a catastrophic event arrives. The scientists are forced to evacuate, but Augustine stubbornly refuses to abandon his work. Shortly after the others have gone, Augustine discovers a mysterious child, Iris, and realizes that the airwaves have gone silent. They are alone. At the same time, Mission Specialist Sullivan is aboard the Aether on its return flight from Jupiter. The astronauts are the first human beings to delve this deep into space, and Sully has made peace with the sacrifices required of her: a daughter left behind, a marriage ended. So far the journey has been a success. But when Mission Control falls inexplicably silent, Sully and her crewmates are forced to wonder if they will ever get home. As Augustine and Sully each face an uncertain future against forbidding yet beautiful landscapes, their stories gradually intertwine in a profound and unexpected conclusion. In crystalline prose, Good Morning, Midnight poses the most important questions: What endures at the end of the world? How do we make sense of our lives? Lily Brooks-Dalton’s captivating debut is a meditation on the power of love and the bravery of the human heart. Praise for Good Morning, Midnight “Stunningly gorgeous . . . The book contemplates the biggest questions—What is left at the end of the world? What is the impact of a life’s work?”—Portland Mercury “A beautifully written, sparse post-apocalyptic novel that explores memory, loss and identity . . . Fans of Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven and Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora will appreciate the Brooks-Dalton’s exquisite exploration of relationships in extreme environments.”—The Washington Post “Ambitious . . . Brooks-Dalton’s prose lights up the page in great swathes, her dialogue sharp and insightful, and the high-concept plot drives a story of place, elusive love, and the inexorable yearning for human contact.”—Publishers Weekly “Beautiful descriptions create a sense of wonder and evoke feelings of desolation. . . . Brooks-Dalton’s heartfelt debut novel unfolds at a perfect pace as it asks readers what will be left when everything in the world is gone.”—Booklist “Good Morning, Midnight is a remarkable and gifted debut novel. Lily Brooks-Dalton is an uncanny chronicler of desolate spaces, whether it’s the cold expanse of the universe or the deepest recesses of the human heart.”—Colson Whitehead “With imagination, empathy, and insight into unchanged and unchangeable human nature, Lily Brooks-Dalton takes us on an emotional journey in this beautiful debut.”—Yiyun Li “A truly original novel, otherworldly and profoundly human . . . Good Morning, Midnight is a fascinating story, surprising and inspiring at every turn.”—Keith Scribner

Good Morning, Midnight

Good Morning, Midnight

The last of the four novels Jean Rhys wrote in interwar Paris, Good Morning, Midnight is the culmination of a searing literary arc, which established Rhys as an astute observer of human tragedy. Her everywoman heroine, Sasha, must confront the loves-- and losses-- of her past in this mesmerizing and formally daring psychological portrait.

Good Morning, Midnight

A Dalziel and Pascoe Mystery

Good Morning, Midnight

"A complex and deeply satisfying tale...one part traditional English whodunit and one part shadowy corporate thriller." --Publishers Weekly (starred review) Prominent businessman Pal Maciver locked himself in his study and shot himself. It's an open-and-shut case, as far as Detective Superintendent Andy Dalziel is concerned. Except...Maciver's father died in an almost identical manner ten years earlier, and "Fat Andy" was the investigating officer. Pal's strange and strained relationship with his beautiful, enigmatic stepmother, Kay Kafka, also raises warning flags. And the family's shady corporate dealings carry two apparent acts of self-slaughter far beyond the borders of Yorkshire, causing policeman Peter Pascoe to question his superior's reticence...and his motives.

Good Morning, Midnight

Good Morning, Midnight

For fans of STATION ELEVEN and THE MARTIAN 'A remarkable and gifted debut novel' Colson Whitehead, author of THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD 'What does it mean to be isolated from the ordinariness of the everyday world, yet to find the extraordinariness of being close to another human being?' Yiyun Li, PEN/Hemingway Award winner There is a particular beauty in silence, in being cut off from the world. Augustine is a brilliant, ageing scientist, consumed by the stars. Isolated in the cold but electrifying beauty of an Arctic Circle research base, he scans the universe, trying to find the origins of time itself. Mission Specialist Sullivan, a divorced astronaut and mother, is aboard the Aether, on its return flight from Jupiter. When all communication goes silent, she is left wondering what she will be returning to. As the silence expands, these two character begin to understand their place in the world, and what gives their life meaning. For only in the silence can we find out who we truly are. GOOD MORNING MIDNIGHT is an extraordinarily beautiful and poignant novel about what is to be human - what is means to have experienced ambition, loss, grief, what it means to love and be loved. 'A beautifully written, sparse post-apocalyptic novel that explores memory, loss and identity ... Fans of Emily St. John Mandel's Station Eleven and Kim Stanley Robinson's Aurora will appreciate the Brooks-Dalton's exquisite exploration of relationships in extreme environments.' Washington Post

Underground Writing

The London Tube from George Gissing to Virginia Woolf

Underground Writing

This exciting volume explores the way in which the London Underground (“The Tube”) was mapped by a number of writers, including George Orwell, H. G. Wells, George Gissing, and Virginia Woolf, from the late Victorian era to the end of World War II. Represented diversely as a Dantean underworld, a psychological looking-glass, and a place for safety and security, the Underground is evaluated here as portrayed in fiction, poetry, and art, as well as a borderland for cultural construction in transport history, anthropology, and urban studies. Linking adventurous literature with the actual underground modes of transit, author David Welsh reshapes the metaphorical world of “underground writing” and places it in its proper social and political context.

Colonialism and the Modernist Moment in the Early Novels of Jean Rhys

Colonialism and the Modernist Moment in the Early Novels of Jean Rhys

Colonialism and the Modernist Moment in the Early Novels of Jean Rhys explores the postcolonial significance of Rhys’s modernist period work, which depicts an urban scene more varied than that found in other canonical representations of the period. Arguing against the view that Rhys comes into her own as a colonial thinker only in the post-WWII period of her career, this study examines the austere insights gained by Rhys’s active cultivation of her fringe status vis-à-vis British social life and artistic circles, where her sharp study of the aporias of marginal lives and the violence of imperial ideology is distilled into an artistic statement positing the outcome of the imperial venture as a state of homelessness across the board, for colonized and ‘metropolitans’ alike. Bringing to view heretofore overlooked émigré populations, or their children, alongside locals, Rhys’s urbanites struggle to construct secure lives not simply as a consequence of commodification, alienation, or voluntary expatriation, but also as a consequence of marginalization and migration. This view of Rhys’s early work asserts its vital importance to postcolonial studies, an importance that has been overlooked owing to an over hasty critical consensus that only one of her early novels contains significant colonial content. Yet, as this study demonstrates, proper consideration of colonial elements long considered only incidental illuminates a colonial continuum in Rhys’s work from her earliest publications.

Home, Maison, Casa

The Politics of Location in Works by Jean Rhys, Marguerite Duras, and Erminia Dell'Oro

Home, Maison, Casa

A comparative study of the highly problematic concept of home in works by authors born and raised in colonial contexts and repatriated as young adults to European homelands which they had never before seen. They write at an angle to nationalist or imperialist constructions of home and create terragraphica, or a place from which to write.

Ferocious Things

Jean Rhys and the Politics of Women’s Melancholia

Ferocious Things

It’s fatal making a fuss ... . -Jean Rhys, Quartet. Cathleen Maslen’s Ferocious Things: Jean Rhys and the Politics of Women’s Melancholia closely engages with the most obvious theme of Rhys’s writing: the speaking and inscription of feminine anguish. Maslen resists easy generalisations with respect to Rhys’s portrayal of women’s psychic pain, attending carefully to the nuances of sexual, cultural and ethnic displacement which inform the suffering of Rhys’s protagonists. Acknowledging the many fine recent critical engagements with Rhys’s unique corpus of novels, Maslen insists that Rhys’s particular articulation of women’s pain presents a significant literary transgression, defying the intractable cultural interdiction against women ‘making a fuss.’ At the same time, this book engages with the problematic privileging of melancholic and nostalgic discourse in the Western canon in general. Rhys’s work, Maslen argues, simultaneously celebrates and resists fundamentally Eurocentric and anti-feminist paradigms of melancholia and nostalgia. In short, the ferocious melancholia of Jean Rhys’s female voices poses constructive paradoxes and points of departure for feminist and post-colonial debates in the 21st century.

Modernism and Autobiography

Modernism and Autobiography

This is the first book of its kind to address modernist autobiography in a comprehensive manner.