Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

The best-selling phenomenon from Japan that shows us a minimalist life is a happy life. Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo—he’s just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn’t absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him. In Goodbye, Things Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement can not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasaki’s humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalism’s potential.

Summary

Goodbye, Things - The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki

Summary

Goodbye Things - The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Consumer society has led to a profusion of material possessions. However, this has come at a price: our own happiness. Having too many choices, possibilities, and desires stops us from seeing what is important. Overloaded with things and activities, many of us no longer know what we're doing and what we need to do. Minimalism is a concrete and immediate solution. It allows you to tidy up your life and find happiness. Perhaps you feel stressed, tired, under pressure, bombarded, and are lacking space and money? Well, minimalism is the answer you've been looking for! Why read this summary: Save time Understand the key concepts Notice: This is a GOODBYE THINGS Book Summary. NOT THE ORIGINAL BOOK.

Summary of Fumio Sasaki’s Goodbye, Things by Milkyway Media

Summary of Fumio Sasaki’s Goodbye, Things by Milkyway Media

In Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism (2015), minimalist and author Fumio Sasaki explains how readers can improve their lives by reducing the number of possessions they own. By simplifying their belongings and getting rid of anything that isn’t essential, minimalists free themselves from some of the day-to-day stress that comes with ownership, like excessive clutter and time-intensive upkeep… Purchase this in-depth summary to learn more.

Goodbye, Things

On Minimalist Living

Goodbye, Things

'Meet the new king of decluttering' - The Times 'Take your spring cleaning to the next level with Goodbye, Things by Fumio Sasaki' - Parade 'There's happiness in having less. If you are anything like how I used to be - miserable, constantly comparing yourself with others, or just believing your life sucks - I think you should try saying goodbye to some of your things' Fumio Sasaki is a writer in his thirties who lives in a tiny studio in Tokyo with three shirts, four pairs of trousers, four pairs of socks and not much else. A few years ago, he realised that owning so much stuff was weighing him down - so he started to get rid of it. In this hit Japanese bestseller, Sasaki explores the philosophy behind minimalism and offers a set of straightforward rules - discard it if you haven't used it in a year; be a borrower; find your uniform; keep photos of the things you love - that can help all of us lead simpler, happier, more fulfilled lives.

The Longing for Less

Living with Minimalism

The Longing for Less

New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice "More than just a story of an abiding cultural preoccupation, The Longing For Less peels back the commodified husk of minimalism to reveal something surprising and thoroughly alive." -Jenny Odell, author of How to Do Nothing “Less is more”: Everywhere we hear the mantra. Marie Kondo and other decluttering gurus promise that shedding our stuff will solve our problems. We commit to cleanse diets and strive for inbox zero. Amid the frantic pace and distraction of everyday life, we covet silence-and airy, Instagrammable spaces in which to enjoy it. The popular term for this brand of upscale austerity, “minimalism,” has mostly come to stand for things to buy and consume. But minimalism has richer, deeper, and altogether more valuable gifts to offer. Kyle Chayka is one of our sharpest cultural observers. After spending years covering minimalist trends for leading publications, he now delves beneath this lifestyle's glossy surface, seeking better ways to claim the time and space we crave. He shows that our longing for less goes back further than we realize. His search leads him to the philosophical and spiritual origins of minimalism, and to the stories of artists such as Agnes Martin and Donald Judd; composers such as John Cage and Julius Eastman; architects and designers; visionaries and misfits. As Chayka looks anew at their extraordinary lives and explores the places where they worked-from Manhattan lofts to the Texas high desert and the back alleys of Kyoto-he reminds us that what we most require is presence, not absence. The result is an elegant new synthesis of our minimalist desires and our profound emotional needs.

The Power of Chowa

Finding Your Balance Using the Japanese Wisdom of Chowa

The Power of Chowa

'Following Tanaka's wisdom is an easy way to start making life feel just a little more balanced' the Independent The Japanese wisdom of chowa offers a fresh perspective on how to live, and new ways to find balance among the many different directions that modern life pulls us in. Chowa is a Japanese concept that is often translated as 'harmony', but more accurately means 'the search for balance'. Chowa is both a philosophy and a set of practices that can help us get to the heart of what is most important to us, and change our way of thinking about ourselves and others. This book will teach you how to apply the lessons of chowa to your own life to better focus on what really matters and cultivate an everyday state of equilibrium and calm that will help you feel ready for anything. Chowa helps us to better balance our priorities and our relationships and find inner strength and flexibility in times of change and difficulty. Whether you are searching for balance at home, at work, in your relationships or in any other area of your life, chowa offers new solutions and a way of thinking that we could all benefit from, now more than ever.

Secondhand

Travels in the New Global Garage Sale

Secondhand

"Revelatory, terrifying, but, ultimately, hopeful." -Elizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of THE SIXTH EXTINCTION From the author of Junkyard Planet, a journey into the surprising afterlives of our former possessions. Downsizing. Decluttering. Discarding. Sooner or later, all of us are faced with things we no longer need or want. But when we drop our old clothes and other items off at a local donation center, where do they go? Sometimes across the country-or even halfway across the world-to people and places who find value in what we leave behind. In Secondhand, journalist Adam Minter takes us on an unexpected adventure into the often-hidden, multibillion-dollar industry of reuse: thrift stores in the American Southwest to vintage shops in Tokyo, flea markets in Southeast Asia to used-goods enterprises in Ghana, and more. Along the way, Minter meets the fascinating people who handle-and profit from-our rising tide of discarded stuff, and asks a pressing question: In a world that craves shiny and new, is there room for it all? Secondhand offers hopeful answers and hard truths. A history of the stuff we've used and a contemplation of why we keep buying more, it also reveals the marketing practices, design failures, and racial prejudices that push used items into landfills instead of new homes. Secondhand shows us that it doesn't have to be this way, and what really needs to change to build a sustainable future free of excess stuff.