Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

There it was, hanging in the sky above the school: the blazing green skull with a serpent tongue, the mark Death Eaters left behind whenever they had entered a building... wherever they had murdered... When Dumbledore arrives at Privet Drive one summer night to collect Harry Potter, his wand hand is blackened and shrivelled, but he does not reveal why. Secrets and suspicion are spreading through the wizarding world, and Hogwarts itself is not safe. Harry is convinced that Malfoy bears the Dark Mark: there is a Death Eater amongst them. Harry will need powerful magic and true friends as he explores Voldemort's darkest secrets, and Dumbledore prepares him to face his destiny...

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Book 6)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Book 6)

When Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince opens, the war against Voldemort has begun. The Wizarding world has split down the middle, and as the casualties mount, the effects even spill over onto the Muggles. Dumbledore is away from Hogwarts for long periods, and the Order of the Phoenix has suffered grievous losses. And yet, as in all wars, life goes on. Harry, Ron, and Hermione, having passed their O.W.L. level exams, start on their specialist N.E.W.T. courses. Sixth-year students learn to Apparate, losing a few eyebrows in the process. Teenagers flirt and fight and fall in love. Harry becomes captain of the Gryffindor Quidditch team, while Draco Malfoy pursues his own dark ends. And classes are as fascinating and confounding as ever, as Harry receives some extraordinary help in Potions from the mysterious Half-Blood Prince. Most importantly, Dumbledore and Harry work together to uncover the full and complex story of a boy once named Tom Riddle—the boy who became Lord Voldemort. Like Harry, he was the son of one Muggle-born and one Wizarding parent, raised unloved, and a speaker of Parseltongue. But the similarities end there, as the teenaged Riddle became deeply interested in the Dark objects known as Horcruxes: objects in which a wizard can hide part of his soul, if he dares splinter that soul through murder. Harry must use all the tools at his disposal to draw a final secret out of one of Riddle’s teachers, the sly Potions professor Horace Slughorn. Finally Harry and Dumbledore hold the key to the Dark Lord’s weaknesses... until a shocking reversal exposes Dumbledore’s own vulnerabilities, and casts Harry’s—and Hogwarts’s—future in shadow.

Ultimate Unofficial Guide to the Mysteries of Harry Potter

Analysis of

Ultimate Unofficial Guide to the Mysteries of Harry Potter

A guide to J.K. Rowling's sixth Harry Potter novel analyzes mysterious elements, themes, and puzzles hidden throughout the works and speculates about the plots and endings of the last volume in the series.

How to Analyze the Works of J. K. Rowling

How to Analyze the Works of J. K. Rowling

This title explores the creative works of famous novelist J.K. Rowling. Books analyzed include Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Clear, comprehensive text gives background biographical information of Rowling. "You Critique It" feature invites readers to analyze other creative works on their own. A table of contents, timeline, list of works, resources, source notes, glossary, and an index are also included. Essential Critiques is a series in Essential Library, an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.

Harry Potter

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone; Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets; Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban; Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire; Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix; Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince; Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Harry Potter

A fabulous opportunity to own all seven Harry Potter titles - Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows- in a fantastic boxed set

Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. & J. K. Rowling V. Rdr Books and 10 Does

Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. & J. K. Rowling V. Rdr Books and 10 Does

This case is an essential reference for any author or publisher who is considering the publicati0n of an unauthorized book that complements or comments upon copyrighted material by another author. In this case, J. K. Rowling and Warner Brothers prevailed against RDR Books, which had published an unauthorized "companion guide" that relied very heavily on "fictional facts" created by J. K. Rowling in the Harry Potter series.

Seriality and Texts for Young People

The Compulsion to Repeat

Seriality and Texts for Young People

Seriality and Texts for Young People is a collection of thirteen scholarly essays about series and serial texts directed to children and youth, each of which begins from the premise that a basic principle of seriality is repetition.

The J.K. Rowling Encyclopedia

The J.K. Rowling Encyclopedia

Presents alphabetically arranged entries on Rowling's characters, settings, motifs, spells, and magical creatures; as well as the people, places, and events that shaped her life and writings.

Broken Wand (Or, How J.K. Rowling Killed Harry Potter)

Broken Wand (Or, How J.K. Rowling Killed Harry Potter)

Broken Wand: Or How J.K. Rowling Killed Harry Potter is a detailed critique by Timothy A. Wolf of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the last book in Rowling's acclaimed series, and how he believes she disregarded everything she wrote in her previous novels. For Harry Potter fans, Broken Wand is must-have reading! Using the actual texts, the author finds issues with Rowling's continuity. Like the Trace Charm that would have made it impossible for the teenage Voldemort to get away with killing his Muggle relatives. Or the idea of Harry carrying a piece of Voldemort's soul inside him from the start, when the Dark Lord couldn't even touch him for the first four books. Or "wandlore," which has no consistency to it at all. Citing plot elements like: questioning Harry's account of the murder in the previous book, the Ministry taking over Hogwarts, Snape's Pensieve memories, and Dumbledore explaining his mistakes; Broken Wand maintains that Rowling's Deathly Hallows is essentially just a bad copy of the fifth book in the series, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Wolf also contends that Dumbledore, Snape, Lily Potter, and Voldemort are completely out of character, and Harry merely repeats the same emotional journey he went through before. Plus, there are many questions and plots left unresolved. About the Author: Timothy A. Wolf spent two years researching and writing Broken Wand. As a science fiction reader his entire life and an adult fan of the Harry Potter novels, he wanted to bring the problems he found with the final book to light. He lives in Franklin, Wisconsin. Publisher's website: http: //www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/BrokenWand-OrHowJKRowlingKilledHarryPotter.html