How to Be Happy (or at Least Less Sad)

A Creative Workbook

How to Be Happy (or at Least Less Sad)

Author and illustrator Lee Crutchley brings his lively interactive approach to a little-discussed but very common issue: the struggle with depression and anxiety. Through a series of supportive, surprising, and engaging prompts, HOW TO BE HAPPY (OR AT LEAST LESS SAD) helps readers see things in a new light, and rediscover simple pleasures and everyday joy...or at least feel a little less sad. By turns a workbook, trusted friend, creative outlet, security blanket, and secret diary, the pages of this book will offer solace, distraction, engagement, a fresh perspective, and hopeful new beginnings--for readers of all ages and walks of life.

How to Be Happy (or at Least Less Sad)

A Creative Workbook

How to Be Happy (or at Least Less Sad)

HOW TO BE HAPPY (OR AT LEAST LESS SAD) is a workbook offering a place of solace, distraction, and a fresh perspective on life. This book will not fix you and it will not make you happy, but it promises to help you rediscover the simple pleasures in life and, ultimately, make you feel that little less sad. "This book made me nervous when I first scanned through it because I knew it would work! This isn't a self-help book; it's more of a blue-collar, get-down-to business friend with calloused hands who is ready to boogie when you are. This book is about action. But also acknowledgement. There are no platitudes and its author is no Pollyanna. It's an explicit map that leads to a place where you're going to feel measurably better, and better equipped to face life's vicissitudes." - Rob Delaney, Comedian

Depression

Depression

Depression, a medical disorder distinct from sadness or grief, affects people around the world of all ages, though many of them are not diagnosed or do not receive adequate treatment. This book explains the symptoms of depression, how it can vary across individuals, how to diagnose it, and ways to treat it and cope with it. The genetic risk factors of depression are explored, including how genetic therapy may help people with depression in the future.