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Young Mental Health

Mindscape Series

Young Mental Health

How do we talk about Mental Health? Are we having the sometimes-difficult conversations that we need to with our children? And why is all this more relevant than ever in India? Read Young Mental Health to find out. Co-authored by Amrita Tripathi and Meera Haran Alva, and featuring a foreword and key interview with leading child and adolescent psychiatrist Dr Amit Sen, the book relies on interviews, lived experience and story-telling through comics to share a unique insight into what it means to be an adolescent or young adult in India today, the kinds of pressure and stressors they face and how to start approaching some serious – even life-saving – conversations.

Madness Network News Volume 3

Madness Network News Volume 3

Madness Network News (MNN) began as a San Francisco Bay area newsletter in 1972 and then evolved into a quarterly newspaper whose readership extended to a national as well as an international audience. MNN became, in essence, the voice and networking center for the “Mental Patient Liberation Movement” in the United States, unapologetically advocating for the full human dignity, self-expression and civil rights of people diagnosed and labeled as mentally ill. As a quarterly journal, Madness Network News published personal experiences, creative writings, art, political analysis, and factual reporting from the point of view of people who had been on the receiving end of psychiatric treatment and who now found themselves relegated to pariah status, living in marginalized and oppressive conditions and denied even the most basic aspects of personal choice, self-determination and human rights. Known for its use of humor and sense of irony, MNN declared on its masthead that it covered “all the fits that’s news to print.” Zealously advocating for nearly 15 years, Madness Network News ceased publication in 1986. MNN remains an invaluable and unique historical and primary source material that continues to elucidate the concerns, existential dilemmas and lives of people diagnosed and labeled as mentally ill both in the past and today.

Darkness Visible

A Memoir of Madness

Darkness Visible

The New York Times–bestselling memoir of crippling depression and the struggle for recovery by the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Sophie’s Choice. In the summer of 1985, William Styron became numbed by disaffection, apathy, and despair, unable to speak or walk while caught in the grip of advanced depression. His struggle with the disease culminated in a wave of obsession that nearly drove him to suicide, leading him to seek hospitalization before the dark tide engulfed him. Darkness Visible tells the story of Styron’s recovery, laying bare the harrowing realities of clinical depression and chronicling his triumph over the disease that had claimed so many great writers before him. His final words are a call for hope to all who suffer from mental illness that it is possible to emerge from even the deepest abyss of despair and “once again behold the stars.” This ebook features a new illustrated biography of William Styron, including original letters, rare photos, and never-before-seen documents from the Styron family and the Duke University Archives.

Robert Burton’s Rhetoric

An Anatomy of Early Modern Knowledge

Robert Burton’s Rhetoric

Published in five editions between 1621 and 1651, The Anatomy of Melancholy marks a unique moment in the development of disciplines, when fields of knowledge were distinct but not yet restrictive. In Robert Burton’s Rhetoric, Susan Wells analyzes the Anatomy, demonstrating how its early modern practices of knowledge and persuasion can offer a model for transdisciplinary scholarship today. In the first decades of the seventeenth century, Robert Burton attempted to gather all the existing knowledge about melancholy, drawing from professional discourses including theology, medicine, and philology as well as the emerging sciences. Examining this text through a rhetorical lens, Wells provides an account of these disciplinary exchanges in all their subtle variety and abundant wit, showing that questions of how knowledge is organized and how it is made persuasive are central to rhetorical theory. Ultimately, Wells argues that in addition to a book about melancholy, Burton’s Anatomy is a meditation on knowledge. A fresh interpretation of The Anatomy of Melancholy, this volume will be welcomed by scholars of early modern English and the rhetorics of health and medicine, as well as those interested in transdisciplinary work and rhetorical theory.

Cion

Cion

At the instigation of the sciolist, Toloki, the professional mourner introduced in Zakes Mda's early novel Ways of Dying, takes the opportunity to travel the world in search of new ways of mourning. He finds himself abandoned in Athens Ohio, but a chance meeting with a Halloween reveller leads him to the poor hamlet of Kilvert, home to descendants of fugitive slaves. A community of traditional quiltmakers, the people of Kilvert, and notably the Quigley family, offer Toloki hospitality while never completely coming to terms with what they regard as his shamanistic attributes. From them he learns the stories told by the quilts and the secrets held by the sycamores - ghost trees that are the carriers of memories - and he becomes aware that this is a community which strives to keep alive their past in order to validate the present. They cannot let go, for the past is all they have. And it is through the quilts and the sycamores and the messages they carry that the old story is told of the slaves in the plantations of the south and their eternal quest to escape and find their freedom, interwoven with the story of life in present-day Kilvert. It is also a time of growth for Toloki, bringing about a softening of his former austerity and enabling him to determine the path his future will take.