How We Sleep at Night

A Mother's Memoir

How We Sleep at Night

A christian mother comes to terms with her son being gay through a personal journey that starts with the Church and ends at the Pride Parade.

Lost in the Fog: Memoir of a Bastard

A Belgian Recalls the War, the Nazis, Her Fractured Life

Lost in the Fog: Memoir of a Bastard

The courageous story of Van Meers, born in a home for unwed mothers in Ghent, Belgium, 1930. It is told in her own words in a frank, humorous and down-to-earth manner. She grew up as a "bastard" during the Great Depression, and sees her family and country told apart by prejudice and politics in World War II, and recounts how she struggles to redefine herself in turbulent postwar Europe. Based on hundreds of hours of taped interviews, Rachel's view of a family "not-quite-normal," her amazing strength in the face of abusive and degrading treatment, and her strong faith and upbeat attitude make her story a joy and inspiration to read.

Coming Up Trumps: A Memoir

Coming Up Trumps: A Memoir

The Top 10 Sunday Times bestseller. In this characteristically trenchant memoir, the indomitable Jean Trumpington looks back on her long and remarkable life. The daughter of an officer in the Bengal Lancers and an American heiress, Jean Campbell-Harris was born into a world of considerable privilege, but the Wall Street Crash entirely wiped out her mother's fortune. At fifteen, the young Jean Campbell-Harris was sent to Paris to study but two years later, with the outbreak of the Second World War, she became a land girl. However, she quickly changed direction, joining naval intelligence at Bletchley Park, where she stayed for the rest of the war. After the war she worked first in Paris and then on Madison Avenue, New York, with advertising's 'mad men'. It was here that she met her husband, the historian Alan Barker, and their marriage, in 1954, ushered in the happiest period of her life before embarking on her distinguished political career, as a Cambridge City councillor, Mayor of Cambridge and, then, in 1980, a life peer. Forthright, witty and deliciously opinionated, Coming Up Trumps is a wonderfully readable account of a life very well lived.

Memoirs of a Life Insurance Icon: Khuda Buksh

Memoirs of a Life Insurance Icon: Khuda Buksh

The Memoirs of a Life Insurance Icon: Khuda Buksh illustrates the life of a legendary Insurance Specialist who chose to serve humanity by sparking an insurance awareness movement in three countries (India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh). Between 1930 and 1970, Khuda Buksh worked tirelessly to establish the insurance business in the region, overcoming engrained religious and cultural prejudices against life insurance amid enormous political upheaval. His passion, devotion, and unique sales strategies led him to train, motivate, and manage thousands of salesmen during his long career. He earned a reputation as the countrys most magnetic and dynamic sales executive and wizard of life insurance. He played a role as an educator to the vast number of field force who placed faith in his leadership and took insurance as career. His leadership strategies helped life insurance to flourish and to penetrate nearly every portion of society. Compiled more than 35 years after Khuda Bukshs death, this book uses interviews with dozens of contemporaries and family members who reminiscence Khuda Bukshs personality and role in promoting life insurance in Bangladesh and Pakistan. He is one figure among Bengali Muslims who popularized life insurance among the people. His name itself is an institution and in his own lifetime he became a legendary figure. . . Dacca Rotary News He was an outstanding salesman who even in his dreams would only be able to think of life insurance; he was totally obsessed by it. A typical Bengali, small body, but with a big heart for everyone. . . he rose to the occasion and became a very big name in the field of life insurance. . . Wolfram W. Karnowski I still think if we measure with a balance between life insurance and Khuda Bukshit will be extremely difficult to measure, which one is heavier. A wizard with a legendary stature in insurance . . . -S. R. Khan Mr. Khuda Buksh would be very personally involved in the welfare and the personal interest of each field worker . . . As far as the life insurance industry in Pakistan is concerned, especially in the 50s and 60s, Khuda Bukshs role was undoubtedly the greatest. . . Joseph M. Pereira He used to say: think of insurance, dream of insurance, sleep of insurance. Devote your time to insurance . . . He was an unbeatable legend of insurance. . . Sharafat Ali Qureshi He was a very good leader, and this was apparent from the fact that he could train not one, but hundreds, and thousands of people. All his subordinates were just like his children . . . M. A. Chishti I used to hear about the great reputation of this giant personality of the life insurance arena. When I came to know him from close, I had no problem realizing the appropriateness of the title father of insurance by which he was known in this part of the world. . . -M. Faizur Razzaque

Mermaid: A Memoir of Resilience

Mermaid: A Memoir of Resilience

“Extraordinarily courageous; [Cronin] chronicles her journey to fit in and thrive with bravery and wit.”—O, The Oprah Magazine At the age of three, Eileen Cronin first realized that only she did not have legs. Her boisterous Catholic family accepted her situation as “God’s will,” treating her no differently than her ten siblings, as she “squiddled” through their 1960s Cincinnati home. But starting school, even wearing prosthetics, Cronin had to brave bullying and embarrassing questions. Thanks to her older brother’s coaching, she handled a classmate’s playground taunts with a smack from her lunchbox. As a teen, thrilled when boys asked her out, she was confused about what sexuality meant for her. She felt most comfortable and happiest relaxing and skinny dipping with her girlfriends, imagining herself “an elusive mermaid.” The cause of her disability remained taboo, however, even as she looked toward the future and the possibility of her own family. In later years, as her mother battled mental illness and denied having taken the drug thalidomide—known to cause birth defects—Cronin felt apart from her family. After the death of a close brother, she turned to alcohol. Eventually, however, she found the strength to set out on her own, volunteering at hospitals and earning a PhD in clinical psychology. Reflecting with humor and grace on her youth, search for love, and quest for answers, Cronin spins a shimmering story of self-discovery and transformation.

Make Me a Mother: A Memoir

Make Me a Mother: A Memoir

A woman unexpectedly finds her best self through a sleepy bundle handed over at the airport in this heartfelt and surprising memoir. In Make Me a Mother, acclaimed memoirist Susanne Antonetta adopts an infant from Seoul, South Korea. After meeting their six-month-old son, Jin, at the airport—an incident made memorable when Susanne, so eager to meet her son, is chased down by security—Susanne and her husband learn lessons common to all parents, such as the lack of sleep and the worry and joy of loving a child. They also learn lessons particular to their own family: not just how another being can take over your life but how to let an entire culture in, how to discuss birth parents who gave up a child, and the tricky steps required to navigate race in America. In the end, her relationship with her son teaches Susanne to understand her own troubled childhood and to forgive and care for her own aging parents. Susanne comes to realize how, time and time again, all families have to learn to adopt one another.

A Memoir of Jane Austen

and Other Family Recollections

A Memoir of Jane Austen

'I doubt whether it would be possible to mention any author of note, whose personal obscurity was so complete.' James Edward Austen-Leigh's Memoir of his aunt Jane Austen was published in 1870, over fifty years after her death. Together with the shorter recollections of James Edward's two sisters, Anna Lefroy and Caroline Austen, the Memoir remains the prime authority for her life and continues to inform all subsequent accounts. These are family memories, the record of Jane Austen's life shaped and limited by the loyalties, reserve, and affection of nieces and nephews recovering in old age the outlines of the young aunt they had each known. They still remembered the shape of her bonnet and the tone of her voice, and their first-hand accounts bring her vividly before us. Their declared partiality also raises fascinating issues concerning biographical truth, and the terms in which all biography functions. This edition brings together for the first time these three memoirs, and also includes Jane's brother Henry Austen's 'Biographical Notice' of 1818 and his lesser known 'Memoir' of 1833, making a unique biographical record. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Danse Macabre: Memoir of a Polish Girl at the Time of the Russian Revolution (1914/1924)

Danse Macabre: Memoir of a Polish Girl at the Time of the Russian Revolution (1914/1924)

Memoir of a Polish Girl at the Time of the Russian Revolution (1914/1924). Expanded second edition with additional photographs. Irene Rochas was born Aniela Tarnowicz in Warsaw in 1906, the youngest child in a large upper middle-class Polish family. With the outbreak of WW I in 1914, Irene and her family were stranded in Moscow, and with the further outbreak of the Bolshevik Revolution, they were able to return to their homeland only after a delay of four years. Irene's rediscovered narrative -- written when she was fifty years old and set in the form of a novel -- is a remembrance of those eventful years of her childhood in Moscow and Warsaw. In this sense, it is truly a "memoir". Yes, "danse macabre" is the dance of death, the last waltz to which we are all invited. But Irene's "Danse Macabre" -- with its inquisitive and empathetic tone... and its often searing imagery -- is less a rumination on the inevitability of death and more a testament to the vibrancy of life itself. [345 pp., Endnote, 29 plates]

Memoirs of a Wartime Romance

The Story of Mr. Bops and Miss Boo

Memoirs of a Wartime Romance

Co-Author: Andrea Siegel Feinberg Mister Bops and Miss Boo is a true love story. It unfolds through the letters, journal entries, and dictated memoirs of a doctor and a nurse during World War II, as they struggle for their love in the face of family resistance, separation, religious prejudice, and their army service. Through their words, you will experience their passion, patriotism, and a unique perspective of army life. It is an emotional page-turner with a dramatic historical ending.

Name All the Animals

A Memoir

Name All the Animals

Recounts the author's teenage experience of losing her beloved older brother in a car accident, a loss after which she managed her grief by engaging in self-destructive behaviors until her forbidden love for another girl helped her define herself beyond her brother's death. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.