Catalog of Copyright Entries. Third Series

1960

Catalog of Copyright Entries. Third Series

Includes Part 1, Number 1 & 2: Books and Pamphlets, Including Serials and Contributions to Periodicals (January - December)

Drive-in Theaters

A History from Their Inception in 1933

Drive-in Theaters

A primarily American institution (though it appeared in other countries such as Japan and Italy), the drive-in theater now sits on the verge of extinction. During its heyday, drive-ins could be found in communities both large and small. Some of the larger theaters held up to 3,000 cars and were often filled to capacity on weekends. The history of the drive-in from its beginnings in the 1930s through its heyday in the 1940s and 1950s to its gradual demise in modern-day America is thoroughly documented here: the patent battles, community concerns with morality (on-screen and off), technological advances (audio systems, screens, etc.), audiences, and the drive-in's place in the motion picture industry.

Outlaws, Rebels, & Vixens: Motion Picture Censorship in Milwaukee, 1914-1971

Outlaws, Rebels, & Vixens: Motion Picture Censorship in Milwaukee, 1914-1971

For nearly 60 years, the Milwaukee Motion Picture Commission (MMPC) had the last word on what was suitable for exhibition at local movie theaters. Born of the high ideals of the Progressive Era, the MMPC evolved into one of the nation's strictest censor boards, and kept hundreds of scenes and films from playing in Milwaukee that ran elsewhere with little to no interference. From the bawdy antics of silent-era comedians to the unabashed sexuality of 1960s, the MMPC saw itself as a defender of Milwaukee's morality throughout a half-century of great change and tumult. As the first-ever book-length examination of a local film censor board, Outlaws, Rebels, & Vixens tells the long-forgotten story of the battle for Milwaukee's cinematic soul. Includes a full index of all films either censored or banned by the MMPC.

Eye on Israel

How America Came to View the Jewish State as an Ally

Eye on Israel

Examines the image of Israel in American culture before 1960.

Teenagers And Teenpics

Juvenilization Of American Movies

Teenagers And Teenpics

Teenagers and Teenpics tells the story of two signature developments in the 1950s: the decline of the classical Hollywood cinema and the emergence of that strange new creature, the American teenager. Hollywood's discovery of the teenage moviegoer initiated a progressive "juvenilization" of film content that is today the operative reality of the American motion picture industry.The juvenilization of the American movies is best revealed in the development of the 1950s "teenpic," a picture targeted at teenagers even to the exclusion of their elders. In a wry and readable style, Doherty defines and interprets the various teenpic film types: rock 'n' roll pictures, j.d. films, horror and sci-fi weirdies, and clean teenpics. Individual films are examined both in light of their impact on the motion picture industry and in terms of their important role in validating the emerging teenage subculture. Also included in this edition is an expanded treatment of teenpics since the 1950s, especially the teenpics produced during the age of AIDS.

Leslie's

Leslie's