Inventing Human Rights A History

Author: Lynn Hunt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393069723
Size: 46.11 MB
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“A tour de force.”—Gordon S. Wood, New York Times Book Review How were human rights invented, and how does their tumultuous history influence their perception and our ability to protect them today? From Professor Lynn Hunt comes this extraordinary cultural and intellectual history, which traces the roots of human rights to the rejection of torture as a means for finding the truth. She demonstrates how ideas of human relationships portrayed in novels and art helped spread these new ideals and how human rights continue to be contested today.

Human Rights In The Twentieth Century

Author: Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139494104
Size: 27.43 MB
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Has there always been an inalienable 'right to have rights' as part of the human condition, as Hannah Arendt famously argued? The contributions to this volume examine how human rights came to define the bounds of universal morality in the course of the political crises and conflicts of the twentieth century. Although human rights are often viewed as a self-evident outcome of this history, the essays collected here make clear that human rights are a relatively recent invention that emerged in contingent and contradictory ways. Focusing on specific instances of their assertion or violation during the past century, this volume analyzes the place of human rights in various arenas of global politics, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented. In doing so, this volume captures the state of the art in a field that historians have only recently begun to explore.

Human Rights And The Uses Of History

Author: Samuel Moyn
Publisher: Verso Trade
ISBN: 1781682631
Size: 46.66 MB
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A series of reflective and critical essays explores the perspectives of leading theorists of human rights, building on the postwar human rights discourse in his acclaimed The Last Utopia to challenge intellectual views about humanitarian intervention.

The Right To Health In International Law

Author: John Tobin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199603294
Size: 63.87 MB
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Lack of access to health care is one of the fundamental problems facing people in both developing and developed countries. This book examines the history, foundation, and meaning of the right to health in international law. It concludes that it is possible to offer an understanding of this right that is practical and capable of being implemented.

Writing History In The Global Era

Author: Lynn Hunt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393245772
Size: 12.25 MB
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Leading historian Lynn Hunt rethinks why history matters in today’s global world and how it should be written. Globalization is emerging as a major economic, cultural, and political force. In Writing History in the Global Era, historian Lynn Hunt examines whether globalization can reinvigorate the telling of history. She looks toward scholars from the East and West collaborating in new ways as they share their ideas. She proposes a sweeping reevaluation of individuals’ active role and their place in society as the keys to understanding the way people and ideas interact. Hunt also reveals how surprising new perspectives on society and the self offer promising new ways of thinking about the meaning and purpose of history in our time.

The Twilight Of Human Rights Law

Author: Eric Posner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199313466
Size: 42.14 MB
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Countries solemnly intone their commitment to human rights, and they ratify endless international treaties and conventions designed to signal that commitment. At the same time, there has been no marked decrease in human rights violations, even as the language of human rights has become the dominant mode of international moral criticism. Well-known violators like Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan have sat on the U.N. Council on Human Rights. But it's not just the usual suspects that flagrantly disregard the treaties. Brazil pursues extrajudicial killings. South Africa employs violence against protestors. India tolerate child labor and slavery. The United States tortures. In The Twilight of Human Rights Law--the newest addition to Oxford's highly acclaimed Inalienable Rights series edited by Geoffrey Stone--the eminent legal scholar Eric A. Posner argues that purposefully unenforceable human rights treaties are at the heart of the world's failure to address human rights violations. Because countries fundamentally disagree about what the public good requires and how governments should allocate limited resources in order to advance it, they have established a regime that gives them maximum flexibility--paradoxically characterized by a huge number of vague human rights that encompass nearly all human activity, along with weak enforcement machinery that churns out new rights but cannot enforce any of them. Posner looks to the foreign aid model instead, contending that we should judge compliance by comprehensive, concrete metrics like poverty reduction, instead of relying on ambiguous, weak, and easily manipulated checklists of specific rights. With a powerful thesis, a concise overview of the major developments in international human rights law, and discussions of recent international human rights-related controversies, The Twilight of Human Rights Law is an indispensable contribution to this important area of international law from a leading scholar in the field.

The International Human Rights Movement

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400841879
Size: 71.93 MB
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During the past several decades, the international human rights movement has had a crucial hand in the struggle against totalitarian regimes, cruelties in wars, and crimes against humanity. Today, it grapples with the war against terror and subsequent abuses of government power. In The International Human Rights Movement, Aryeh Neier--a leading figure and a founder of the contemporary movement--offers a comprehensive and authoritative account of this global force, from its beginnings in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to its essential place in world affairs today. Neier combines analysis with personal experience, and gives a unique insider's perspective on the movement's goals, the disputes about its mission, and its rise to international importance. Discussing the movement's origins, Neier looks at the dissenters who fought for religious freedoms in seventeenth-century England and the abolitionists who opposed slavery before the Civil War era. He pays special attention to the period from the 1970s onward, and he describes the growth of the human rights movement after the Helsinki Accords, the roles played by American presidential administrations, and the astonishing Arab revolutions of 2011. Neier argues that the contemporary human rights movement was, to a large extent, an outgrowth of the Cold War, and he demonstrates how it became the driving influence in international law, institutions, and rights. Throughout, Neier highlights key figures, controversies, and organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and he considers the challenges to come. Illuminating and insightful, The International Human Rights Movement is a remarkable account of a significant world movement, told by a key figure in its evolution.

The Architecture Of Concepts

Author: Peter de Bolla
Publisher:
ISBN: 0823254380
Size: 13.68 MB
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The Architecture of Concepts presents a new history of ideas. Using digital archives to track the historical formation of the concept of human rights across the Anglophone eighteenth century, it argues that a better understanding of the architecture of the concept will enable us to deliver on its universal aspirations.

International History Of The Twentieth Century And Beyond

Author: Antony Best
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317577817
Size: 13.74 MB
Format: PDF
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This hugely successful global history of the twentieth century is written by four prominent international historians for first-year undergraduate level and upward. Using their thematic and regional expertise, the authors have produced an authoritative yet accessible and seamless account of the history of international relations in the last century, covering events in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas. They focus on the history of relations between states and on the broad ideological, economic and cultural forces that have influenced the evolution of international politics over the past one hundred years. The third edition is thoroughly updated throughout to take account of the most recent research and global developments, and includes a new chapter on the international history of human rights and its advocacy organizations, including NGOs. Additional new features include: New material on the Arab Spring, including specific focus on Libya and Syria Increased debate on the question of US decline and the rise of China. A timeline to give increased context to those studying the topic for the first time. A fully revised companion website including links to further resources and self-testing material can be found at www.routledge.com/cw/best Antony Best is Associate Professor in International History at the London School of Economics. Jussi M. Hanhimäki is Professor of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva. Joseph A. Maiolo is Professor of International History at the Department of War Studies, Kings College London. Kirsten E. Schulze is Associate Professor in International History at the London School of Economics.