Is Everyone Really Equal

Author: Ozlem Sensoy
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807776173
Size: 63.52 MB
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This is the new edition of the award-winning guide to social justice education. Based on the authors’ extensive experience in a range of settings in the United States and Canada, the book addresses the most common stumbling blocks to understanding social justice. This comprehensive resource includes new features such as a chapter on intersectionality and classism; discussion of contemporary activism (Black Lives Matter, Occupy, and Idle No More); material on White Settler societies and colonialism; pedagogical supports related to “common social patterns” and “vocabulary to practice using”; and extensive updates throughout. Accessible to students from high school through graduate school, Is Everyone Really Equal? is a detailed and engaging textbook and professional development resource presenting the key concepts in social justice education. The text includes many user-friendly features, examples, and vignettes to not just define but illustrate the concepts. “Sensoy and DiAngelo masterfully unpack complex concepts in a highly readable and engaging fashion for readers ranging from preservice through experienced classroom teachers. The authors treat readers as intelligent thinkers who are capable of deep reflection and ethical action. I love their comprehensive development of a critical social justice framework, and their blend of conversation, clarity, and research. I heartily recommend this book!” —Christine Sleeter, professor emerita, California State University Monterey Bay

Multicultural Education

Author: James A. Banks
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 111951021X
Size: 36.51 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As diversity continues to increase in the United States, ethnic, cultural, social-class, and linguistic gaps are widening between teachers and their students. The rapidly changing educational landscape presents unique challenges and opportunities for addressing diversity both creatively and constructively in schools. Multicultural Education helps current and future educators fully understand sophisticated concepts of culture; become more effective practitioners in diverse classrooms; and view race, class, gender, social class, and exceptionality as intersectional concepts. Now in its tenth edition, this bestselling textbook assists educators to effectively respond to the ways race, social class, and gender interact to influence student behavior and learning. Contributions from leading authorities in multicultural education discuss the effects of class and religion on education; differences in educational opportunities for male, female, and LGBTQ students; and issues surrounding non-native English speakers, students of color, and students with disabilities. Contemporary in relevance, this timely volume promotes multicultural education as a process of school reform. Practical advice helps teachers increase student academic achievement, work effectively with parents, improve classroom assessment, and benefit from diversity.

The Oxford Handbook Of Social Justice In Music Education

Author: Cathy Benedict
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190493771
Size: 23.68 MB
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Music education has historically had a tense relationship with social justice. One the one hand, educators concerned with music practices have long preoccupied themselves with ideas of open participation and the potentially transformative capacity that musical interaction fosters. On the other hand, they have often done so while promoting and privileging a particular set of musical practices, traditions, and forms of musical knowledge, which has in turn alienated and even excluded many children from music education opportunities. The Oxford Handbook of Social Justice in Music Education provides a comprehensive overview and scholarly analyses of the major themes and issues relating to social justice in musical and educational practice worldwide. The first section of the handbook conceptualizes social justice while framing its pursuit within broader contexts and concerns. Authors in the succeeding sections of the handbook fill out what social justice entails for music teaching and learning in the home, school, university, and wider community as they grapple with cycles of injustice that might be perpetuated by music pedagogy. The concluding section of the handbook offers specific practical examples of social justice in action through a variety of educational and social projects and pedagogical practices that will inspire and guide those wishing to confront and attempt to ameliorate musical or other inequity and injustice. Consisting of 42 chapters by authors from across the globe, the handbook will be of interest to anyone who wishes to better understand what social justice is and why its pursuit in and through music education matters. Music education has historically had a tense relationship with social justice. One the one hand, educators concerned with music practices have long preoccupied themselves with ideas of open participation and the potentially transformative capacity that musical interaction fosters. On the other hand, they have often done so while promoting and privileging a particular set of musical practices, traditions, and forms of musical knowledge, which has in turn alienated and even excluded many children from music education opportunities. The Oxford Handbook of Social Justice in Music Education provides a comprehensive overview and scholarly analyses of the major themes and issues relating to social justice in musical and educational practice worldwide. The first section of the handbook conceptualizes social justice while framing its pursuit within broader contexts and concerns. Authors in the succeeding sections of the handbook fill out what social justice entails for music teaching and learning in the home, school, university, and wider community as they grapple with cycles of injustice that might be perpetuated by music pedagogy. The concluding section of the handbook offers specific practical examples of social justice in action through a variety of educational and social projects and pedagogical practices that will inspire and guide those wishing to confront and attempt to ameliorate musical or other inequity and injustice. Consisting of 42 chapters by authors from across the globe, the handbook will be of interest to anyone who wishes to better understand what social justice is and why its pursuit in and through music education matters.

Diversity And Education

Author: Michael Vavrus
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807773433
Size: 50.59 MB
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In his new book, Michael Vavrus helps readers better understand why issues of diversity and difference are so highly contested in the United States and across the globe. Vavrus incorporates specific education examples throughout the text to examine six contested areas: race and ethnicity; socioeconomic class and culture; multicultural and ethnic studies; language; religion; and sexuality and gender. In each of these areas, the author explores how contrasting worldviews found in social conservatism, liberal multiculturalism, and critical multiculturalism influence our understandings about difference and diversity and the education policies we develop as a result. Diversity and Education is designed to help educators move beyond the “how can they believe that?” knee-jerk reaction toward a more informed, strategic understanding of belief systems and political affiliations. Book Features: Brings a contemporary, 21st–century perspective to differing political orientations toward diversity and education. Examines outcomes of diversity debates on children of color, the poor, immigrants, women, and sexual and religious minorities. Uses critical pedagogy with a historical and political economy lens to explain current diversity issues in education. Critiques the diversity stance of new national teacher education standards from the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation. “Diversity and Education can not only help us have conversations about racism, institutionalizedoppression, and cultural fear, it can also offer an intervention that can movereaders towards a deeper critical consciousness about diversity and multicultural education in their own lives.” —From the Foreword by Wayne Au, associate professor at the University of Washington, Bothell, and an editor for Rethinking Schools “Few education scholars have offered as potent and cogent a political and economic analysis of multicultural education and diversity as Professor Michael Vavrus has in his new book. His critique of neoliberalism via critical pedagogy and his advocacy of social justice education are timely and praiseworthy.” —Ramin Farahmandpur, professor, Graduate School of Education, Portland State University “Diversity and Education is a must-read for anyone concerned about why so many policies claiming to ‘help’ diverse students fail, and what alternatives exist. Vavrus clearly believes in the power of teachers who are well-educated critical thinkers. In this lucid and compelling text, he skillfully applies a highly useful framework to unpack historical and contemporary debates about core concepts underlying multiple struggles for education and rights.” —Christine Sleeter, professor emerita, California State University, Monterey Bay

Lgbtq Youth And Education

Author: Cris Mayo
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772445
Size: 55.58 MB
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Based on the diverse experiences of LGBTQ students and their allies, this essential volume brings together in one resource the major issues that schools must address to improve the educational outcomes for gender and sexual minority students—as well as all students. Many of these issues involve negative school-based experiences that teachers and administrators need to be aware of as they interact with students on a daily basis, including those that encourage dropping out, substance abuse, and disproportionate thoughts of suicide. This insightful work not only examines the challenges of discrimination, harassment, and alienation that LGBTQ youth face, but it also captures students’ resilience and creativity in organizing against those challenges. The text includes teaching strategies, innovative projects, curricular revisions, and policy initiatives that have had positive effects on LGBTQ learning, aspirations, and school climate. Book Features: Offers a nuanced portrait of students, showing how issues of race, gender, gender identity, and class shape and complicate their experience. Examines the history and contemporary movements for LGBTQ rights. Describes a variety of discipline-based approaches to teaching students to think about LGBTQ-related concerns. Shows examples of youth organizing into extracurricular groups or creating school- and community-based interventions. Highlights the role of online communities and web-based resources. “This book should be required reading for all K–12 educators and beyond. Departing from the common LG focus of most works on LGBT issues, Mayo offers a crucial analysis of the ways that sexism, transphobia, and homophobia work together to make schools difficult and even dangerous places. Just as importantly, Mayo maintains a refreshing, always practical approach to the ways teachers and administrators can better fulfill the goals of equity for all students.” —A. Finn Enke, associate professor, History, Gender and Women's Studies, director, LGBT Studies, University of Wisconsin–Madison “Mayo goes beyond platitudes and calls for tolerance to investigate the specific conflicts and controversies that seem to inevitably swarm around LGBTQ issues in education. What, we often ask, can we do to protect LGBTQ students, teachers, and families from harassment? Mayo offers answers in this incisive, necessary, and accessible book.” —Jen Gilbert, associate professor, Faculty of Education, York University, Toronto, Ontario Cris Mayo is professor and associate head in the Department of Education Policy, Organization, and Leadership and the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Streetsmart Schoolsmart

Author: Gilberto Q. Conchas
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807771015
Size: 29.64 MB
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“If the cogent messages of this searing and compelling book are heeded and implemented by educational researchers, policymakers, and practitioners, our nation will be greatly enriched by the abundant gifts of young men of color.” —James A. Banks, Kerry and Linda Killinger Professor in Diversity Studies and Director of the Center for Multicultural Education, University of Washington, Seattle “This insightful, theoretically rich, and timely book helps readers understand why many young men turn to gangs and how schools and community-based organizations can counter the lure of the streets to expand opportunities for young men of color.” —Pedro A. Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education, New York University, and author of City Schools and the American Dream “This book provides an important testament to the power we have to change lives and to the remarkable resiliency that brings hope in the face of hardship. —Rachel F. Moran, Michael J. Connell Distinguished Professor of Law and Dean, UCLA School of Law In Streetsmart Schoolsmart, two respected scholars present original research on youth gangs and school success to explain why some boys become disengaged and join gangs while others do not. Chapters vividly describe how urban boys from different ethnic backgrounds (Asian, African American, and Latino) approach schooling and identify the sociocultural factors that affect their choices. The authors concentrate on three areas: (1) the role of marginalized communities in the formation of urban gang youth, (2) the role of community-based organizations in reengaging urban youth, and (3) the role of schools in creating opportunities for urban boys to succeed despite disparities in their economic and social circumstances. Streetsmart Schoolsmart points the way toward important changes that can break the cycle of poverty in American neighborhoods and society. It is essential reading for educators and all professionals working with urban youth, and anyone concerned with the success of young boys. Gilberto Q. Conchas is executive director of the Career Academy Support Network (CASN) at the University of California, Berkeley, and associate professor of education at the University of California, Irvine. James Diego Vigil is professor of social ecology at the University of California, Irvine.

Black Male D

Author: Tyrone C. Howard
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772453
Size: 68.60 MB
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In his new book, the author of the bestseller Why Race and Culture Matter in Schools examines the chronic under-performance of African American males in U.S. schools. Citing a plethora of disturbing academic outcomes for Black males, this book focuses on the historical, structural, educational, psychological, emotional, and cultural factors that influence the teaching and learning process for this student population. Howard discusses the potential and promise of Black males by highlighting their voices to generate new insights, create new knowledge, and identify useful practices that can significantly improve the schooling experiences and life chances of Black males. Howard calls for a paradigm shift in how we think about, teach, and study Black males. Book Features: Examines current structures, ideologies, and practices that both help and hinder the educational and social prospects of Black males. Translates frequently cited theoretical principles into research-based classroom practice. Documents teacher-student interactions, student viewpoints, and discusses the troubling role that sports plays in the lives of many Black males. Highlights voices and perspectives from Black male students about ways to improve their schooling experiences and outcomes. Identifies community-based programs that are helping Black males succeed. “Howard is more than a reformer. He seeks to dismantle a system that stifles dreams, devours hopes, and destroys opportunities. . . . He offers us a road map for how to do this and an invitation to join him in this venture. Let us hope that more than a few of those who read this book will enthusiastically accept his offer and join him in this important work.” —From the Foreword by Pedro A. Noguera, New York University “Black Male(d) is a timely, masterfully crafted contribution to an important conversation about one of our nation’s most misunderstood populations. Anyone who is troubled by the status of Black boys in schools and society will find much that is useful in this book. The author’s brilliance is apparent and praiseworthy.” —Shaun R. Harper, Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education, University of Pennsylvania “This book pushes educators to not only know more but to do more on behalf of Black males. This is the book that shows us how to reform practices, policies, and places in order to improve the human condition of Black males. Howard reminds us all that we absolutely must do better—our children’s lives depend on it!” —H. Richard Milner IV, Helen Faison Endowed Chair of Urban Education, University of Pittsburgh Tyrone C. Howard is professor of education at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles.

Race Frameworks

Author: Zeus Leonardo
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772658
Size: 66.25 MB
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This is a comprehensive introduction to the main frameworks for thinking about, conducting research on, and teaching about race and racism in education. Renowned theoretician and philosopher Zeus Leonardo surveys the dominant race theories and, more specifically, focuses on those frameworks that are considered essential to cultivating a critical attitude toward race and racism. The book examines four frameworks: Critical Race Theory (CRT), Marxism, Whiteness Studies, and Cultural Studies. A critique follows each framework in order to analyze its strengths and set its limits. The last chapter offers a theory of race ambivalence, which combines aspects of all four theories into one framework. Engaging and cutting edge, Race Frameworks is a foundational text suitable for courses in education and criticalrace studies.

Race Empire And English Language Teaching

Author: Suhanthie Motha
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772712
Size: 62.25 MB
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This timely and critical look at the teaching of English shows how language is used to create hierarchies of cultural privilege in public schools across the United States. Drawing on the work of four ESL teachers who pursued anti-racist pedagogical practices during their first year of teaching, the author provides a compelling account of how new teachers might gain agency for culturally responsive teaching in spite of school cultures that often discourage such approaches. She combines current research and original analyses to shed light on real classroom situations faced by teachers of linguistically diverse populations. This book will help pre- and inservice teachers to think about such challenges as differential achievement between language learners and “native-speakers”; hierarchies of languages and language varieties; the difference between an accent identity and an incorrect pronunciation; and the use of students’ first languages in English classes. An important resource for classroom teaching, educational policy, school leadership, and teacher preparation, this volume includes reflection questions at the end of each chapter. “This is an important and timely book. How to best educate new Americans, including the best language policies, is a matter of controversy and dissent. Race, Empire, and English Language Teaching is must reading for teachers and school administrators, policymakers, and concerned citizens who are interested in a deeper understanding of how anti-racist pedagogical practices and culturally responsive teaching can work to engage all students moving forward.” —Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, dean and distinguished professor of education, UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, co-author of Learning a New Land “Foregrounding teachers’ voices, Motha lucidly conceptualizes ideological facets of teaching English—monolingualism, native speakerism, and standard language—as racialized practices that undergird colonial power and contradict pluricentric understandings of English. Her analysis is intellectually robust, morally engaging, and discursively accessible. This is a must-read for all ESL professionals.” —Ryuko Kubota, professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, The University of British Columbia Suhanthie Motha is assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Teachers Without Borders

Author: Alyssa Hadley Dunn
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807771600
Size: 29.78 MB
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" Teachers Without Borders?is the story of four Indian teachers who came to the United States in the face of tremendous personal and professional odds to teach in urban schools. Their experiences are brought to life in this groundbreaking empirical study through interviews with their principals, district representatives in charge of recruitment and orientation, recruitment agency personnel, and union representatives, as well as in-depth classroom observations and student commentary. This well-researched work raises an essential question: If international teachers face daily exploitation, a lack of personal and professional support, and a lack of pedagogical and cultural preparation, are they able to give urban students the high-quality multicultural education they need and deserve? Book Features: An engaging case study that tackles competing discourses about immigration, globalization, and teacher quality. The voices of international teachers highlighting the successes and challenges of their experience and comparisons to teachers in other cities across the country. An examination of the differences in student and teacher expectations and how these influence teaching and learning. Alyssa Hadley Dunnis an assistant professor of urban teacher education at Georgia State University. “Teachers Without Borders?underscores the need for teacher educators and district personnel to incorporate culturally relevant pedagogy into their programs and professional support.” —From the Foreword byJacqueline Jordan Irvine “Teachers Without Borders?documents the advent of hiring international teachers to fill shortages in urban schools. Dunn’s extraordinary analysis shows the lack of preparation of these teachers and, as important, she teaches us how to build the kind of support that will transform this kind of teacher recruitment into a system that matters for students, their schools, and their communities.” —Ann Lieberman, Senior Scholar, Stanford University, co-author ofTeachers in Professional CommunitiesandHow Teachers Become Leaders “Alyssa Hadley Dunn argues that both students and international teachers are being misled. This is an excellent and important study.” —Carl A. Grant, Hoefs-Bascom Professor, University Wisconsin-Madison “In this highly readable case study, Dunn exposes how the rhetoric of ‘cultural awareness’ used to justify hiring temporary international teachers masks a deeper devaluation of teachers, students of color, and pedagogical knowledge.” —Christine Sleeter, professor emerita, California State University, Monterey Bay, co-author ofTeaching with Vision: Culturally Responsive Teaching in Standards-Based Classrooms "Teachers Without Borders?will transport you through the local and the global, interweaving nuanced portraits of teachers from abroad with troubling unveilings of the bigger picture behind teacher recruitment and school reform. Insightful, passionate, and expansive, this book is a must-read.” —Kevin Kumashiro, University of Illinois at Chicago, author ofBad Teacher! How Blaming Teachers Distorts the Bigger Picture; “In this brilliantly rendered case, we see the human consequences when advocates adopt profit-driven strategies, assume quick-fix solutions, and embrace an arid view of teaching and learning. We can also glimpse pathways toward creating a system capable of educating all children in our wildly diverse democracy.” —William Ayers, educator and bestselling author ofTo Teach, Third EditionandTeaching the Taboo “Teachers Without Borders?opens a new window on the complex realities of cultural literacy in our schools, the challenges of culturally responsive pedagogy in our classrooms, and the still promising opportunities for reform today.” —Jeff Biggers, author ofState Out of the Union: Arizona and the Final Showdown Over the American Dream “This highly-readable and moving book couples compelling case studies with hard-hitting social and political critique. In a sensitive yet unflinching analysis, Alyssa Hadley Dunn exposes the complex economic, professional, and humanitarian issues involved in international teacher recruitment. Although many readers will not be aware of this problem before reading the book, they will never be able to forget it once they do.” —Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Cawthorne Professor of Teacher Education, Lynch School of Education, Boston College "