Just Ride

A Radically Practical Guide to Riding Your Bike

Just Ride

“No matter what or how you ride, read this book and remind yourself just how enjoyable cycling can and should be.”—Eben Weiss, author of The Enlightened Cyclist Just Ride is a revelation. Forget the ultralight, uncomfortable bikes, flashy jerseys, clunky shoes that clip onto tiny pedals, the grinding out of endless miles. Instead, ride like you did when you were a kid—just get on your bike and discover the pure joy of riding it. A reformed racer who’s commuted by bike every day since 1980, whose writings and opinions appear in major bicycling and outdoor magazines, and whose company, Rivendell Bicycle Works, makes bikes for riders ready to opt out of a culture overrun by racing, Grant Petersen shares a lifetime of unexpected facts, controversial opinions, expert techniques, and his own maverick philosophy. In 87 short, two-to-three page chapters, it covers: Riding: Count Days, Not Miles; Corner Like Jackie Robinson; Steer with Your Hips, Shift with Your Legs Suiting Up: The Shoes Ruse; Ponchos—the Ultimate Unracer’s Garment Safety: #1 Rule—Be Seen; Helmets Aren’t All They’re Cracked Up to Be Health and Fitness: Why Riding Is Lousy All-Around Exercise; Saddles Don’t Cause Impotence; Drink When You’re Thirsty—Not Before Also includes chapters on Accessories, Upkeep, and Technicalities, and a final chapter titled “Velosophy” that includes the essential, memorable thought: Your Bike Is a Toy—Have Fun with It. Winner Silver Medal 2013 Independent Publisher Book Awards

The Moulton Bicycle

A History of the Innovative Compact Design

The Moulton Bicycle

In 1963, British inventor Alex Moulton (1920–2012) introduced an innovative compact bicycle. Architectural Review editor Reyner Banham (1922–1988) predicted it would give rise to “a new class of cyclists,” young urbanites riding by choice, not necessity. Forced to sell his firm in 1967, Moulton returned in the 1980s with an even more radical model, the AM—his acclaim among technology and design historians owed much to Banham’s writings. The AM’s price tag (some models cost many thousands of dollars) has inspired tech-savvy cyclists to create “hot rod” compact bikes from Moulton-inspired “shopper” cycles of the 1970s—a trend also foreseen by Banham, who considered hot rod culture the “folk art of the mechanical era.” The author traces the intertwined lives of two unusually creative men who had an extraordinary impact on each others’ careers, despite having met only a few times.

Bicycles in American Highway Planning

The Critical Years of Policy-Making, 1969-1991

Bicycles in American Highway Planning

The United States differs from other developed nations in the extent to which its national bicycle transportation policy relies on the use of unmodified roadways, with cyclists obeying the same traffic regulations as motor vehicles. This policy--known as "vehicular cycling"--evolved between 1969, when the "10-speed boom" saw a sharp increase in adult bicycling, and 1991, when the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials adopted an official policy that on-road bikeways were not desirable. This policy resulted from a growing realization by highway engineers and experienced club cyclists that they had parallel interests: the cyclists preferred to ride on highways, because most bikeways were not designed for high speeds and pack riding; and the highway engineers did not want to divert funding from roadways to construct bikeways. Using contemporary magazine articles, government reports, and archival material from industry lobbying groups and national cycling organizations, this book tells the story of how America became a nation of bicyclists without bikeways.

Organizing and Big Scary Goals

Working With Discomfort and Doubt To Create Real Life Order

Organizing and Big Scary Goals

Are you looking for a fresh, authentic approach to living a more organized life? Are you ready to move beyond “how to” and be more personally practical about managing your stuff, time, and tasks? Organizing and Big Scary Goals offers readers alternative, customizable, and most importantly, realistic ways to look at and reflect upon what is possible with managing the overwhelming stuff of everyday life. Through a series of relatable anecdotes, thought-provoking questions, and the author’s personal quest to tackle a tough challenge, readers gain insight on tapping into different ways to approach their organizing stuck spots without relying upon one-size-fits-all solutions. Organizing and Big Scary Goals reads like a series of short stories with doses of humor and irony - ideal for anyone who has experienced frustration, shame, and even fear about meeting the organizational standards of others.

Introduction to Law and Legal Thinking

Introduction to Law and Legal Thinking

In Anthony D'Amato's writing, two passions merge: law and language. His eloquence - and hence the sheer readability of his writing - is virtually a byword among teachers and students alike. This introduction to law is far from basic in its coverage, yet it never becomes mired in tedious detail or lost in impenetrable fog. It is perhaps the only reader-friendly book available today that truly clarifies the deep and basic concepts of law in general, and American law in particular. It does not simply introduce the concepts; rather, it is an introduction to thinking about the concepts.

The New Guide to Motorcycling

The New Guide to Motorcycling

A motorcycle enthusiast answers questions about choosing and safely riding a bike and pointers on obtaining insurance