Frida Kahlo, 1907-1954

Pain and Passion

Frida Kahlo, 1907-1954

An account of the noted Mexican painter's difficult and tumultuous personal and professional life accompanies some of her most notable paintings.

Carr, O'Keeffe, Kahlo

Places of Their Own

Carr, O'Keeffe, Kahlo

Carr, a Canadian, O'Keeffe, an American, and Kahlo, a Mexican, were not close during their lives, but Udall (an independent art historian in Santa Fe, New Mexico), in this carefully reasoned and illuminating study, effectively brings many aspects of the artists' works together to demonstrate a kind of zeitgeist they shared as women developing often surprisingly similar, non-traditional themes in the 1920s. Links between their works are developed in the areas of nationalism, identity, gender, nature, and self through discussion of their paintings, psychology, and artistic influences. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR

Encontrando a Frida Kahlo

Encontrando a Frida Kahlo

Details the artwork, papers, books, clothing, and miscellaneous objects found in five cases in an antique shop in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, and believed to have been the property of noted Mexican artist Frida Kahlo.

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

The immense emotional and physical wounds Kahlo suffered in her difficult life, due in part to a tragic streetcar accident and marriage to fellow Mexican artist Diego Rivera, inspired her paintings.

Frida Kahlo

Mexican Artist

Frida Kahlo

Introduction to the life and work of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, who has shaped the world, impacted humanity, and changed the course of history.

Latin American Women Artists, Kahlo and Look who Else

A Selective, Annotated Bibliography

Latin American Women Artists, Kahlo and Look who Else

This volume is a unique contribution to Latin American studies because it underscores the essential role that women have played in the arenas of modern and contemporary art. [This book] provides valuable and much-needed assistance to the researcher. (From the foreword by Elizabeth Ferrer) With more than 1,500 references on nearly 800 women Latin American Women Artists, Kahlo and Look Who Else pays tribute to the rich and multifaceted artistic accomplishments of women in and from 20th-century Latin America. Frida Kahlo has until recently dominated the interest of scholars, curators, and the public to the point of almost eclipsing the achievements of other artists from the region. This selectively annotated bibliography begins systematically to identify other women -- painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, performance artists, and others -- who have made significant contributions to the history of art in the region. The first section, the main part of the work, consists of individual artists grouped in an alphabetical country arrangement. Artists in each country are listed A-Z, as are the citations about them. Annotations are descriptive and highlight, among other details, the presence of biographical and professional development information in the analyzed materials. A section of general works arranged by country follows, consisting principally of periodical and monographic literature that deals with numerous women, and a listing of the women mentioned in the cited materials. The volume has two appendices. The first is an analyzed list of 77 collective exhibitions in which works by these women have been presented. The second appendix groups the artists by country, allowing for an in-brief look at all of the artists identified in the bibliography. The name index references artists to the main section by country code and also includes entries for authors, curators, and exhibition catalogue essayists.

María Izquierdo and Frida Kahlo

Challenging Visions in Modern Mexican Art

María Izquierdo and Frida Kahlo

María Izquierdo (1902–1955) and Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) were the first two Mexican women artists to achieve international recognition. During the height of the Mexican muralist movement, they established successful careers as easel painters and created work that has become an integral part of Mexican modernism. Although the iconic Kahlo is now more famous, the two artists had comparable reputations during their lives. Both were regularly included in major exhibitions of Mexican art, and they were invariably the only women chosen for the most important professional activities and honors. In a deeply informed study that prioritizes critical analysis over biographical interpretation, Nancy Deffebach places Kahlo's and Izquierdo's oeuvres in their cultural context, examining the ways in which the artists participated in the national and artistic discourses of postrevolutionary Mexico. Through iconographic analysis of paintings and themes within each artist's oeuvre, Deffebach discusses how the artists engaged intellectually with the issues and ideas of their era, especially Mexican national identity and the role of women in society. In a time when Mexican artistic and national discourses associated the nation with masculinity, Izquierdo and Kahlo created images of women that deconstructed gender roles, critiqued the status quo, and presented more empowering alternatives for women. Deffebach demonstrates that, paradoxically, Kahlo and Izquierdo became the most successful Mexican women artists of the modernist period while most directly challenging the prevailing ideas about gender and what constitutes important art.

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Behind Frida Kahlo’s portraits, lies the story of both her life and work. It is precisely this combination that draws the reader in. Frida’s work is a record of her life, and rarely can we learn so much about an artist from what she records inside the picture frame. Frida Kahlo truly is Mexico’s gift to the history of art. She was just eighteen years old when a terrible bus accident changed her life forever, leaving her handicapped and burdened with constant physical pain. But her explosive character, raw determination and hard work helped to shape her artistic talent. And although he was an obsessive womanizer, the great painter Diego Rivera was by her side. She won him over with her charm, talent and intelligence, and Kahlo learnt to lean on the success of her companion in order to explore the world, thus creating her own legacy whilst finding herself surrounded by a close-knit group of friends. Her personal life was turbulent, as she frequently left her relationship with Diego to one side whilst she cultivated her own bisexual relationships. Despite this, Frida and Diego managed to save their frayed relationship. The story and the paintings that Frida left us display a courageous account of a woman constantly on a search of self discovery.

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

FRIDA KAHLO is probably the most idolized artist of her time. At the root of the scholarly speculation and pop-culture paraphernalia lies Frida Kahlo: An Open Life, first published in Mexico in 1983. This irreplaceable, eclectic collection reveals the complexities, profound sadness, and immutable creative spirit of the famed Mexican artist. The intimate picture of the often enigmatic Kahlo presented in this book has become an invaluable source for Kahlo scholars. Raquel Tibol, one of Mexico's most respected art critics and art historians, befriended Diego Rivera in Chile and in 1953 came with him to Mexico City, where she met and interviewed Frida Kahlo a year before Kahlo's death. She lived with Kahlo for a while at Coyoacan in Mexico City and then for a time at Rivera's San Angel Inn home. Frida Kahlo: An Open Life uses medical records, journals, letters, interviews, and personal recollections to bring us closer than ever to the Mexican artist and her milieu. Elinor Randall's translation makes Tibol's rich portrait of the remarkable Frida Kahlo available in English for the first time.

Kahlo

Kahlo

Behind Frida Kahlo’s portraits, lies the story of both her life and work. It is precisely this combination that draws the reader in. Frida’s work is a record of her life, and rarely can we learn so much about an artist from what she records inside the picture frame. Frida Kahlo truly is Mexico’s gift to the history of art. She was just eighteen years old when a terrible bus accident changed her life forever, leaving her handicapped and burdened with constant physical pain. But her explosive character, raw determination and hard work helped to shape her artistic talent. And although he was an obsessive womanizer, the great painter Diego Rivera was by her side. She won him over with her charm, talent and intelligence, and Kahlo learnt to lean on the success of her companion in order to explore the world, thus creating her own legacy whilst finding herself surrounded by a close-knit group of friends. Her personal life was turbulent, as she frequently left her relationship with Diego to one side whilst she cultivated her own bisexual relationships. Despite this, Frida and Diego managed to save their frayed relationship. The story and the paintings that Frida left us display a courageous account of a woman constantly on a search of self discovery.