Ladies And Gentlemen Of The Jury

Greatest Closing Arguments

Ladies And Gentlemen Of The Jury

In the hands of a skilled trial lawyer, the closing argument offers the courtroom's greatest dramatic possiblilities. It is the advocate's last opportunity to convince the jury of their version of the "truth" before the defendent's fate is sealed. Every argument included here is a finely crafted verbal work of art - they represent the modern-day, highest form of an ancient profession and art: that of the storyteller. The only available collection of great closing arguments - complete with insightful analysis and biographical profiles of the lawyers involved - this fascinating volume gathers the passionate finales of the most celebrated cases in history. Included are the climactic closes to the Nuremberg War Trials; Gerry Spence's crusade against the Kerr-McGee Nuclear Power Plant after the mysterious death of Karen Silkwood; Vincent Bugliosi's successful prosecution of cult leader Charles Manson and his followers; the astounding acquittal of John Delorean despite video evidence of his offences and the prosecution resulting from the Mai Lai massacre.

The Winning Argument

The Winning Argument

Examines twelve characteristics of a winning argument and presents the rudiments and sophisticated levels of persuasion based upon ancient and modern techniques.

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down

Greatest Closing Arguments Protecting Civil Liberties

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down

A compendium of closing arguments that were given during eight key civil rights court cases documents such landmark precedents as the Amistad slavery case and the Larry Flynt free speech trial, in a volume complemented by historical information, attorney bios, and analyses of the closing arguments. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

New York Law Journal Digest-annotator

... Year Covering the Lower Court Opinions of the First and Second Judicial Departments, as Published in the New York Law Journal

New York Law Journal Digest-annotator


William P. Homans Jr

A Life in Court

William P. Homans Jr

Boston lawyer William P. Homans Jr. devoted his fifty-year career to the defense of the poor and downtrodden, the protection of our most basic civil liberties, and the abolition of the death penalty. Descendant of two of Boston's oldest and most prominent families, and combat veteran of both the British and American Navies during World War II, Homans became unlikely guru to the 1960s generation of radical lawyers and antiwar activists. He was on the defense team in the 1968 conspiracy trial of Dr. Benjamin Spock and four other leading opponents of the Vietnam War accused of aiding and abetting resistance to the military draft, and represented Dr. Kenneth Edelin in the 1975 manslaughter prosecution arising out of a lawful abortion performed after Roe v. Wade. The narrative contrasts Bill Homans' storied legal career with a troubled personal life in a balanced but unvarnished manner, testifying to the strength of the human spirit when committed to the pursuit of the common good. About the author: Mark S. Brodin is Professor of Law at Boston College Law School and the author of numerous books and law journal articles in the areas of civil and criminal procedure, evidence, litigation, and employment discrimination. A graduate of Columbia College (1969) and Columbia Law School (1972), he served as law clerk to United States District Judge Joseph L. Tauro and staff attorney with the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights in Boston. He has also practiced for brief periods as a public defender in Boston and a prosecutor in Norfolk County.

Never Too Late

A Prosecutor's Story of Justice in the Medgar Evars Case

Never Too Late

In June 12, 1963, Mississippi's fast-rising NAACP leader Medgar Evers was gunned down by a white supremacist named Byron De La Beckwith. Beckwith escaped conviction twice at the hands of all-white Southern juries, and his crime went unpunished for more than three decades. Now, from Bobby DeLaughter, one of the most celebrated prosecutors in modern American law, comes the blistering account of his remarkable crusade in 1994 finally to bring the assassin of Medgar Evers to justice. This is the fascinating, real-life story of the assistant district attorney -- played by Alec Baldwin in Rob Reiner's Ghosts of Mississippi -- who brought closure to one of the darkest chapters of the civil rights movement. When the district attorney's office in Jackson, Mississippi, decided to reopen the case, the obstacles in its way were overwhelming: missing court records; transcripts that were more than thirty years old; original evidence that had been lost; new testimony that had to be taken regarding long-ago events; and the perception throughout the state that a reprosecution was a futile endeavor. But step by painstaking step, DeLaughter and his team overcame the obstacles and built their case. With taut prose that reads like a great detective thriller, Never Too Late is a page-turner of the very highest order. It charts the course of a country lawyer who, concerned about the collective soul of his community and the nature of American justice in general, dared to revisit a thirty-one-year-old case -- one so incendiary that everyone warned him not to touch it -- and win a long-overdue conviction. DeLaughter's success in this trial stands today as a landmark in the annals of criminal prosecution, and this bracing first-person account brings the saga to life as never before.