The Empress Matilda

Queen Consort, Queen Mother and Lady of the English

The Empress Matilda

This is the first comprehensive and fully documented study of the Empress Matilda to be published in English. Much of the serious work on her life and historical importance has never been translated from German, and almost all has concentrated on the years of her struggle with Stephen for the English crown. This book examines her career as a whole, including the years as consort of the Emperor Henry V and as regent in Normandy for her son Henry II. It illustrates the problems of female succession in the early twelfth century, and gives a balanced assessment of Matilda's character and achievements in the context of her own times.

Lady Of The English

Lady Of The English

Two very different women . . . Linked by destiny and a power struggle for the English crown. Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I, is determined to win back her crown from Stephen, the usurper king, against all odds and despite all men. Adeliza, Henry's widowed queen and Matilda's stepmother, has always been on Matilda's side but now she is married to William D'Albini, a warrior of the opposition. In a world where a man's word is law, how can Adeliza obey her husband while supporting Matilda, the rightful queen? What does it cost to be 'Lady of the English'?

The Mirror of the Graces

Or, The English Lady's Costume. Containing General Instructions for Combining Elegance, Simplicity, and Economy with Fashion in Dress; Hints on Female Accomplishments and Manners; and Directions for the Preservation of Health and Beauty

The Mirror of the Graces


The English Woman in Egypt : Letters from Cairo written during a residence there in 1842 - 46

The English Woman in Egypt : Letters from Cairo written during a residence there in 1842 - 46

First published in 1844 and 1846, The Englishwoman in Egypt is the collected observations of Sophia Poole, who lived in Cairo from 1842 until 1849 with her brother, the well known Orientalist Edward Lane, and her two children. During her residence, Poole learned Arabic and adopted Egyptian clothing that enabled her not only to observe day-to-day life in the streets and markets but also to enter hammams and harems and interact on an intimate level with Egyptian women of different classes. Poole ultimately had access, in fact, to the highest levels of society, including the family of the viceroy, Mohamed 'Ali Pasha, and recorded her experiences there with the same eye for detail and understanding of underlying customs as she brought to bear in the marketplace. She moves effortlessly from situation to situation - the pasha's daughter smoking her jewel-encrusted pipe, the homesick slave-girl, the occupation of ladies of leisure - one scene after another is unfolded in her writing that reveals not only a mind that observes and records but a human being who attempts to feel and understand a different culture. In contrast to her brother's dense works of research, Sophia Poole's was cast in the form of letters to a friend. These letters cover her arrival in Alexandria and trip up the Nile to Cairo, as well as her life in Cairo, with its visits to surrounding villages. The Englishwoman in Egypt is at once entertaining and informative. If Edward Lane kept alive for posterity a post-medieval Cairo that has since disappeared, then his sister in her work no doubt complemented that great achievement by presenting the same world from a feminine perspective that he as a man could not have access to.

The English and Scottish Popular Ballads

The English and Scottish Popular Ballads

This definitive 19th-century collection compiles all the extant ballads with all known variants and features Child's commentary for each work. Volume IV includes Parts VII and VIII of the original set — ballads 189-265.

The Lady of the Rivers

The Lady of the Rivers

When the death of Joan of Arc shows her the dangers faced by strong women, Jacquetta, a psychic descendant of a river goddess, studies alchemy and becomes the secret wife of Richard Woodville before returning to the court of Henry VI.

The Lady with the Binoculars

The Lady with the Binoculars

Manolo the Latin lover has kissed goodbye to his last-unnamed-British housewife. Now he is in a prison cell in Palma, Mallorca, claiming to have been the top of the pop-into-bed favorite with more than 100 women holiday makers in the past three years. Some were German, some Scandinavian, but the great majority were British. And all were aged 40 or over, on holiday without their menfolk. In a good season, the handsome, 30 year old Spaniard reckoned to be able to woo and win them at the rate of five a week. The trouble was, according to police, that on his way out of their holiday hotel bedrooms, Manolo often stopped to take a little souvenir-like jewelry or a purseful of pesetas. He usually got away with it, because by that time the ladies were blissfully asleep. He is caught finally by a furious blonde, who finds his identity card has slipped out of his pocket onto the bedroom floor.