LaRose

LaRose

'It is important to say that Erdrich is one of the greatest living American writers, and LaRose is brilliant' Guardian 'Warm-hearted . . . a novel remarkable for its forgiveness and sheer magnanimity' Sunday Times Finalist for the 2016 National Books Critics Circle Award for Fiction In this literary masterwork, Louise Erdrich, the bestselling author of The Round House and the Pulitzer Prize nominee The Plague of Doves wields her breathtaking narrative magic in an emotionally haunting contemporary tale of a tragic accident, a demand for justice, and a profound act of atonement with ancient roots in Native American culture. Late summer in North Dakota, 1999: Landreaux Iron stalks a deer along the edge of the property bordering his own. He shoots with easy confidence but only when he staggers closer does he realise he has killed his neighbour's son. Dusty Ravich, the deceased boy, was best friends with Landreaux's five-year-old son, LaRose. The two families have been close for years and their children played together despite going to different schools. Landreaux is horrified at what he's done; fighting off his longstanding alcoholism, he ensconces himself in a sweat lodge and prays for guidance. And there he discovers an old way of delivering justice for the wrong he's done. The next day he and his wife Emmaline deliver LaRose to the bereaved Ravich parents. Standing on the threshold of the Ravich home, they say, 'Our son will be your son now'. LaRose is quickly absorbed into his new family. Gradually he's allowed visits with his birth family, whose grief for the son and brother they gave away mirrors that of the Raviches. The years pass and LaRose becomes the linchpin that links both families. As the Irons and the Raviches grow ever more entwined, their pain begins to subside. But when a man who nurses a grudge against Landreaux fixates on the idea that there was a cover-up the day Landreaux killed Dusty - and decides to expose this secret - he threatens the fragile peace between the two families...

LaRose

by Louise Erdrich | Summary & Analysis

LaRose

LaRose by Louise Erdrich | Summary & Analysis Preview: LaRose by Louise Erdrich is a novel about two little boys who are torn from their families and the infinite sorrow that’s left in their wake of their separations. As the repercussions of a tragic hunting accident unfold on a North Dakota reservation from 1999 to 2003, the narrative intermittently reaches back in time as far as 1839 to explore stories from the families’ Ojibwe heritage. Almost two hundred years’ worth of Ojibwe culture, American history, and family drama are brought to bear on the unusual situation of LaRose Iron, a five-year-old who handles an impossible situation with wisdom and grace. The central narrative starts off with a bang: Landreaux Iron, a skilled hunter, has shot his neighbors’ son. When five-year-old Dusty Ravich fell from his hiding place in a tree, he took a bullet that was meant for a deer. Landreaux is officially absolved of any wrongdoing; the shooting was… PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread Summary of LaRose: · Summary of the Book · Important People · Character Analysis · Analysis of the Themes and Author’s Style About the Author With Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience.

The Shadow of Larose

The Shadow of Larose

The Shadow of Larose Arthur Gask Arthur Cecil Gask (1869-1951), dentist and novelist. He began writing crime fiction while waiting for his patients and in 1921 paid for the publication of his first novel, The Secret of the Sandhills, which was an immediate success. Over a period of forty years Gask wrote over thirty books as well as contributing short stories to The Mail in Adelaide. Most of his novels described the activities of a detective, Gilbert Larose, in solving crimes. Gask's work was translated into several European languages, serialised in newspapers and broadcast on radio. He also wrote short stories. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience. The Shadow of Larose book The Shadow of Larose epub The Shadow of Larose pdf The Shadow of Larose review

The Caribbean Novel Since 1945

Cultural Practice, Form, and the Nation-State

The Caribbean Novel Since 1945

The Caribbean Novel Since 1945 offers a comparative analysis of fiction from across the pan-Caribbean, exploring the relationship between literary form, cultural practice, and the nation-state. Engaging with the historical and political impact of capitalist imperialism, decolonization, class struggle, ethnic conflict, and gender relations, it considers the ways in which Caribbean authors have sought to rethink and re-narrate the traumatic past and often problematic 'postcolonial' present of the region's peoples. It pays particular attention to the role cultural practices such as stickfighting and Carnival, as well as religious rituals and beliefs like Vodou and Myal, have played in efforts to reshape the novel form. In so doing, it provides an original perspective on the importance of these practices, with their emphasis on bodily movement, to the development of new philosophies of history. Beginning in the post-WWII period, when optimism surrounding the possibility of social and political change was at a peak, The Caribbean Novel Since 1945 interrogates the trajectories of various national projects through to the present. It explores how the textual histories of common motifs in Caribbean writing have functioned to encode the fluctuating fortunes of different political dispensations. The scope of the analysis is varied and comprehensive, covering both critically acclaimed and lesser-known authors from the Anglophone, Francophone, and Hispanophone traditions. These include Jacques Roumain, Sam Selvon, Marie Chauvet, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Earl Lovelace, Patrick Chamoiseau, Erna Brodber, Wilson Harris, Shani Mootoo, Oonya Kempadoo, Ernest Moutoussamy, and Pedro Juan Gutiérrez. Mixing detailed analysis of key texts with wider surveys of significant trends, this book emphasizes the continuing significance of representations of the nation-state to literary articulations of resistance to the imperialist logic of global capital.

Debating the Roman de la Rose

A Critical Anthology

Debating the Roman de la Rose

Around the year 1400, the poet Christine de Pizan initiated a public debate in France over the literary "truth" and merit of the Roman of the Rose, perhaps the most renowned work of the French Middle Ages. She argued against what she considered to be misrepresentations of female virtue and vice in the Rose. Her bold objections aroused the support and opposition of some of the period's most famous intellectuals, notable Jean Gerson, whose sermons on the subject are important literary documents. "The Quarrel of the Rose" is the name given by modern scholars to the collection of these and other documents, including both poetry and letters, that offer a vivid account of this important controversy. As the first dual-language version of the "Quarrel" documents, this volume will be of great interest to medievalists and an ideal addition to the Routledge Medieval Texts series. Along with translations of the actual debate epistles, the volume includes several relevant passages from the Romance of the Rose, as well as a chronology of events and ample biography of source materials.

Joseph Zobel: Négritude and the Novel

Joseph Zobel: Négritude and the Novel

Joseph Zobel (1915-2006) is one of the best-known Francophone Caribbean authors, and is internationally recognised for his novel La Rue Cases-Nègres (1950). Yet very little is known about his other novels, and most readings of La Rue Cases-Nègres consider the text in isolation. Through a series of close readings of the author's six published novels, with supporting references drawn from his published short stories, poetry and diaries, Joseph Zobel: Négritude and the Novel generates new insights into Zobel's highly original decision to develop Négritude's project of affirming pride in black identity through the novel and social realism. The study establishes how, influenced by the American Harlem Renaissance movement, Zobel expands the scope of Négritude by introducing new themes and stylistic innovations which herald a new kind of social realist French Caribbean literature. These discoveries in turn challenge and alter the current understanding of Francophone Caribbean literature during the Négritude period, in addition to contributing to changes in the current understanding of Caribbean and American literature more broadly understood.

Internal Difference and Meanings in the Roman de la Rose

Internal Difference and Meanings in the Roman de la Rose

The Roman de la rose, one of the most important, complex poems of medieval France, has given rise to highly divergent readings since Jean de Meun completed it in the thirteenth century. In Internal Difference and Meanings in the Roman de la rose, one of the foremost authorities on medieval French literature brings his considerable erudition to bear on this classic of medieval romance, illuminating its artistry and controversial morality Douglas Kelly interprets the Roman de la rose in the context of known medieval reading strategies (modus tractandi) elaborated by Jean de Meun himself in the course of the poem. Kelly probes the modes used by Jean, examining the text from their different perspectives and drawing out the multiple readings and allegories present in the poem. He argues that Jean confronts readers with these multiple readings to force them to recognize and ponder the moral implications of the text, and thus to discover their own moral selves by identification, qualification, or distancing. Kelly contrasts the Rose with other works, including models of romance from such forerunners as Ovid and Boethius and writings of medieval critics of the Rose. He looks particularly at the comments of Christine de Pizan, the most outspoken of these critics. Examining both the well-known "Quarrel of the Rose" she started and her writings about the poem, he reveals the complexity and ambivalence of her reception of the Roman de la rose. The confrontation of Jean de Meun and Christine de Pizan, Kelly shows, can be placed in the larger French tradition of moral writing: the moraliste who holds a mirror to human conduct versus the moralisateur who prescribes ideals of conduct.

La Rose D'Amour

La Rose D'Amour

This is the story of a young French virgin called Monsieur Louis. And of his cousins. And of their housemaids. And especially of a girl called Rose. They don't remain virgins very long in this household. Before internet porn, before porn videos, before porn movies, people lusting for raunchy, X-rated entertainment read pornographic books and magazines. Victorian and Edwardian England had its own adult entertainment industry - countless erotic novels were put out by shady publishers, some books were printed by the authors themselves, and most of the writers were anonymous. Many of these 19th century books are surprisingly kinky, and some of them may be quite offensive to modern day readers - in more ways than one. "La Rose d'Amour" was serialized 1879-1880 in William Lazenby's raunchy and controversial The Pearl Magazine. The author is unknown, but according to some sources, the book was first published in France. "La Rose d'Amour" is a great example of Victorian erotica. Please note: the title of this novel is in French, but the book itself is in English.

Data Mining Methods and Models

Data Mining Methods and Models

Apply powerful Data Mining Methods and Models to Leverage your Data for Actionable Results Data Mining Methods and Models provides: * The latest techniques for uncovering hidden nuggets of information * The insight into how the data mining algorithms actually work * The hands-on experience of performing data mining on large data sets Data Mining Methods and Models: * Applies a "white box" methodology, emphasizing an understanding of the model structures underlying the softwareWalks the reader through the various algorithms and provides examples of the operation of the algorithms on actual large data sets, including a detailed case study, "Modeling Response to Direct-Mail Marketing" * Tests the reader's level of understanding of the concepts and methodologies, with over 110 chapter exercises * Demonstrates the Clementine data mining software suite, WEKA open source data mining software, SPSS statistical software, and Minitab statistical software * Includes a companion Web site, www.dataminingconsultant.com, where the data sets used in the book may be downloaded, along with a comprehensive set of data mining resources. Faculty adopters of the book have access to an array of helpful resources, including solutions to all exercises, a PowerPoint(r) presentation of each chapter, sample data mining course projects and accompanying data sets, and multiple-choice chapter quizzes. With its emphasis on learning by doing, this is an excellent textbook for students in business, computer science, and statistics, as well as a problem-solving reference for data analysts and professionals in the field. An Instructor's Manual presenting detailed solutions to all the problems in the book is available onlne.

Jail Sentences

Representing Prison in Twentieth-century French Fiction

Jail Sentences

A long list of canonical writers in Western literature have experienced incarceration and have subsequently written celebrated works about the imprisoned and the condemned. The French tradition is no exception: writers who produced noteworthy texts while incarcerated or who later wrote about their experiences in prison are found on the literary-historical landscape from the medieval era through the twentieth century. Prison writing by inmates, former guards, chaplains, teachers, and doctors is firmly established as part of the fabric of popular culture and has long attracted the attention of culture critics and scholars. Nevertheless, scant analysis exists of the prison novel a literary genre that, as Andrew Sobanet argues in Jail Sentences, uses fiction as a documentary tool. Its narrative peculiarities, which are the main subjects of Sobanet s study, include the use of autobiographical and testimonial techniques to critique the penitentiary system. Jail Sentences is the definitive study of the legacy of the Western tradition of prison writing in twentieth-century French literature. Although Sobanet focuses primarily on French writers Victor Serge, Jean Genet, Albertine Sarrazin, and François Bon his keen sense of literary dialogue pulls into the orbit of his study an international corpus of work, from Dostoyevsky to Malcolm X. Jail Sentences arrives at a coherent definition of the genre, whose unique conventions stem from the innermost regions of our understanding of stories, truth, fiction, and belief.