Encyclopedia Of Modern French Thought

Author: Christopher John Murray
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135455643
Size: 15.19 MB
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In this wide-ranging guide to twentieth-century French thought, leading scholars offer an authoritative multi-disciplinary analysis of one of the most distinctive and influential traditions in modern thought. Unlike any other existing work, this important work covers not only philosophy, but also all the other major disciplines, including literary theory, sociology, linguistics, political thought, theology, and more.

The Birth Of Biopolitics

Author: M. Foucault
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230594182
Size: 53.72 MB
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Foucault continues on the theme of his 1978 course by focusing on the study of liberal and neo-liberal forms of government and concentrating in particular on two forms of neo-liberalism: German post-war liberalism and the liberalism of the Chicago School.

French Historians 1900 2000

Author: Philip Daileader
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444323665
Size: 23.25 MB
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French Historians 1900-2000: The New Historical Writing inTwentieth-Century France examines the lives and writings of 40of France’s great twentieth-century historians. Blends biography with critical analysis of major works, placingthe work of the French historians in the context of their lifestories Includes contributions from over 30 international scholars Provides English-speaking readers with a new insight into thekey French historians of the last century

The Inverted Mirror

Author: Michael E. Nolan
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781571816696
Size: 27.26 MB
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It is hard to imagine nowadays that, for many years, France and Germany considered each other as "arch enemies." And yet, for well over a century, these two countries waged verbal and ultimately violent wars against each other. This study explores a particularly virulent phase during which each of these two nations projected certain assumptions about national character onto the other - distorted images, motivated by antipathy, fear, and envy, which contributed to the growing hostility between the two countries in the years before the First World War. Most remarkably, as the author discovered, the qualities each country ascribed to its chief adversary appeared to be exaggerated or negative versions of precisely those qualities that it perceived to be lacking or inadequate in itself. Moreover, banishing undesirable traits and projecting them onto another people was also an essential step in the consolidation of national identity. As such, it established a pattern that has become all too familiar to students of nationalism and xenophobia in recent decades. This study shows that antagonism between states is not a fact of nature but socially constructed.