Learning with the Brain in Mind

Mindsets Before Skillsets

Learning with the Brain in Mind

The field of Brain Based Learning has grown significantly with the introduction of new technology allowing us to better understand how the brain functions and the effects of various circumstances including acts of learning and the brain's connection to that process of change. Learning with the Brain in Mind explores research about the brain being our gateway to learning, and how what we do mentally and physically is organized in the brain first. This book questions; Why some individuals experience meaningful learning while others do not? What should we know about the nature of learning? How should students be evaluated? Is there a need to rethink the relationship between learning and teaching? In general, current methods of teaching, regardless of the topic or setting, emphasize content, memorization, drills, practice, and test taking. Some approaches tend to look for what is broken and attempt to fix-it. An alternative, based on the brain's connection to the nature of learning, is to provide a safe, playful, less judgmental environment in which self-discovery, experimentation, and adaptation are encouraged.This book is arranged by first presenting a general description of the brain and nervous system and some of the terminology used in this book to enable all readers to have a common vocabulary and appreciation of the interaction of the nervous system to conditions that affect learning. The book then provides insights into how Brain-Compatible Learning can be accomplished.

Teaching with the Brain in Mind

Teaching with the Brain in Mind

When the first edition of Teaching with the Brain in Mind was published in 1998, it quickly became an ASCD best-seller, and it has gone on to inspire thousands of educators to apply brain research in their classroom teaching. Now, author Eric Jensen is back with a completely revised and updated edition of his classic work, featuring new research and practical strategies to enhance student comprehension and improve student achievement. In easy to understand, engaging language, Jensen provides a basic orientation to the brain and its various systems and explains how they affect learning. After discussing what parents and educators can do to get children’s brains in good shape for school, Jensen goes on to explore topics such as motivation, critical thinking skills, optimal educational environments, emotions, and memory. He offers fascinating insights on a number of specific issues, including * How to tap into the brain’s natural reward system. * The value of feedback. * The importance of prior knowledge and mental models. * The vital link between movement and cognition. * Why stress impedes learning. * How social interaction affects the brain. * How to boost students’ ability to encode, maintain, and retrieve learning. * Ways to connect brain research to curriculum, assessment, and staff development. Jensen’s repeated message to educators is simple: You have far more influence on students’ brains than you realize . . . and you have an obligation to take advantage of the incredible revelations that science is providing. The revised and updated edition of Teaching with the Brain in Mind helps you do just that.

Arts with the Brain in Mind

Arts with the Brain in Mind

Publisher description: This book presents the definitive case, based on what we know about the brain and learning, for making arts a core part of the basic curriculum and thoughtfully integrating them into every subject. Separate chapters address musical, visual, and kinesthetic arts in ways that reveal their influence on learning.

Brain-Based Teaching With Adolescent Learning in Mind

Brain-Based Teaching With Adolescent Learning in Mind

Presents the newest research on the adolescent brain and offers a framework for linking brain-based teaching to students' social, emotional, and cognitive needs.

Teaching Children with Autism to Mind-Read

The Workbook

Teaching Children with Autism to Mind-Read

This workbook expands upon the authors? Teaching Children withAutism to Mind-Read: A Practical Guide to present the mosteffective approaches, strategies, and practical guidelines to helpalleviate social and communication problems in individuals withAutism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Complements the best-selling Teaching Children with Autismto Mind-Read: A Practical Guide for use in practicalsettings Answers the need for more training of professionals in earlyinterventions for children assessed with ASD called for by theNational Plan for Autism Written by a team of experts in the field Covers issues such as how to interpret facial expressions; howto recognize feelings of anger, sadness, fear and happiness; how toperceive how feelings are affected by what happens and what isexpected to happen; how to see things from another person?sperspective; and how to understand another person?s knowledge andbeliefs

The First 20 Hours

How to Learn Anything . . . Fast!

The First 20 Hours

Forget the 10,000 hour rule— what if it’s possible to learn the basics of any new skill in 20 hours or less? Take a moment to consider how many things you want to learn to do. What’s on your list? What’s holding you back from getting started? Are you worried about the time and effort it takes to acquire new skills—time you don’t have and effort you can’t spare? Research suggests it takes 10,000 hours to develop a new skill. In this nonstop world when will you ever find that much time and energy? To make matters worse, the early hours of prac­ticing something new are always the most frustrating. That’s why it’s difficult to learn how to speak a new language, play an instrument, hit a golf ball, or shoot great photos. It’s so much easier to watch TV or surf the web . . . In The First 20 Hours, Josh Kaufman offers a systematic approach to rapid skill acquisition— how to learn any new skill as quickly as possible. His method shows you how to deconstruct com­plex skills, maximize productive practice, and remove common learning barriers. By complet­ing just 20 hours of focused, deliberate practice you’ll go from knowing absolutely nothing to performing noticeably well. Kaufman personally field-tested the meth­ods in this book. You’ll have a front row seat as he develops a personal yoga practice, writes his own web-based computer programs, teaches himself to touch type on a nonstandard key­board, explores the oldest and most complex board game in history, picks up the ukulele, and learns how to windsurf. Here are a few of the sim­ple techniques he teaches: Define your target performance level: Fig­ure out what your desired level of skill looks like, what you’re trying to achieve, and what you’ll be able to do when you’re done. The more specific, the better. Deconstruct the skill: Most of the things we think of as skills are actually bundles of smaller subskills. If you break down the subcompo­nents, it’s easier to figure out which ones are most important and practice those first. Eliminate barriers to practice: Removing common distractions and unnecessary effort makes it much easier to sit down and focus on deliberate practice. Create fast feedback loops: Getting accu­rate, real-time information about how well you’re performing during practice makes it much easier to improve. Whether you want to paint a portrait, launch a start-up, fly an airplane, or juggle flaming chain­saws, The First 20 Hours will help you pick up the basics of any skill in record time . . . and have more fun along the way.

12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action

Developing Executive Functions of the Human Brain

12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action

With updated research, revised sections on leadership, and new anecdotes, this second edition helps teachers and students reach higher performance levels based on how the brain learns.

Education and Science

How the BODY lives, How the BRAIN learns, How the HUMAN SYSTEM thinks, How HUMAN SYSTEMS RESEARCH responds, A Progressive Investing Perspective

Education and Science

Let’s talk about education and science: 1. How does the body learn to live? 2. How does the brain learn to learn? 3. How does the human system learn to think? 4. How does human systems research respond? 5. What is a progressive investing perspective? Learn how children, youths, and young adults that have been hurt by major life events in their home, school, neighborhood, or workplace network live, learn, think, and respond. Write Dr. Slaton: Action Research/Systems Thinking/Human Development The Progressive Investing Institute of Focused Learning P.O. Box 278363 Sacramento, CA 95827-8363 “We are here to help.” New Progressive Investing Models Assessment in Learning and Support Services A Human Systems Science Problem-Solving Method Please visit the author's personal website at www.DrSlatonProgressiveInvesting.com

Great Myths of the Brain

Great Myths of the Brain

Great Myths of the Brain introduces readers to the fieldof neuroscience by examining popular myths about the humanbrain. Explores commonly-held myths of the brain through the lens ofscientific research, backing up claims with studies and otherevidence from the literature Looks at enduring myths such as “Do we only use 10% ofour brain?”, “Pregnant women lose their mind”,“Right-brained people are more creative” and manymore. Delves into myths relating to specific brain disorders,including epilepsy, autism, dementia, and others Written engagingly and accessibly for students and lay readersalike, providing a unique introduction to the study of thebrain Teaches readers how to spot neuro hype and neuro-nonsenseclaims in the media