Life On The Line

Author: Grant Achatz
Publisher: Avery
ISBN: 1592406971
Size: 50.37 MB
Format: PDF
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An award-winning chef describes how he lost his sense of taste to cancer, a setback that prompted him to discover alternate cooking methods and create his celebrated progressive cuisine.

Food Lit

Author: Melissa Brackney Stoeger
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598847066
Size: 27.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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An essential tool for assisting leisure readers interested in topics surrounding food, this unique book contains annotations and read-alikes for hundreds of nonfiction titles about the joys of comestibles and cooking.

Food And Masculinity In Contemporary Autobiographies

Author: Nieves Pascual Soler
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319709232
Size: 65.41 MB
Format: PDF
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This book is concerned with food autobiographies written by men from the 1980s to the present. It concentrates on how food has transformed autobiographical narratives and how these define the ways men eat and cook nowadays. After presenting a historical overview of the place of food within men ́s autobiography, this volume analyzes the reasons for our present interest in food and the proliferation of life narratives focused on cooking. Then it centers around the identities that male chefs are taking on in the writing of their lives and the generic models they use: the heroic, the criminal and the hunting autobiographical scripts. This study gives evidence that autobiographies are crucial in the redefinition of the new masculinities emerging in the kitchen. It will appeal to readers interested in Food Studies, Autobiographical Studies, Men's Studies and American Literature and Culture.

The Taste Of Art

Author: Silvia Bottinelli
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 161075607X
Size: 41.93 MB
Format: PDF
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The Taste of Art offers a sample of scholarly essays that examine the role of food in Western contemporary art practices. The contributors are scholars from a range of disciplines, including art history, philosophy, film studies, and history. As a whole, the volume illustrates how artists engage with food as matter and process in order to explore alternative aesthetic strategies and indicate countercultural shifts in society. The collection opens by exploring the theoretical intersections of art and food, food art’s historical root in Futurism, and the ways in which food carries gendered meaning in popular film. Subsequent sections analyze the ways in which artists challenge mainstream ideas through food in a variety of scenarios. Beginning from a focus on the body and subjectivity, the authors zoom out to look at the domestic sphere, and finally the public sphere. Here are essays that study a range of artists including, among others, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Daniel Spoerri, Dieter Roth, Joseph Beuys, Al Ruppersberg, Alison Knowles, Martha Rosler, Robin Weltsch, Vicki Hodgetts, Paul McCarthy, Luciano Fabro, Carries Mae Weems, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Janine Antoni, Elżbieta Jabłońska, Liza Lou, Tom Marioni, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Michael Rakowitz, and Natalie Jeremijenko.

Shouting Won T Help

Author: Katherine Bouton
Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books
ISBN: 1429953373
Size: 59.87 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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For twenty-two years, Katherine Bouton had a secret that grew harder to keep every day. An editor at The New York Times, at daily editorial meetings she couldn't hear what her colleagues were saying. She had gone profoundly deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. As she once put it, she was "the kind of person who might have used an ear trumpet in the nineteenth century." Audiologists agree that we're experiencing a national epidemic of hearing impairment. At present, 50 million Americans suffer some degree of hearing loss—17 percent of the population. And hearing loss is not exclusively a product of growing old. The usual onset is between the ages of nineteen and forty-four, and in many cases the cause is unknown. Shouting Won't Help is a deftly written, deeply felt look at a widespread and misunderstood phenomenon. In the style of Jerome Groopman and Atul Gawande, and using her experience as a guide, Bouton examines the problem personally, psychologically, and physiologically. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, and neurobiologists, and with a variety of people afflicted with midlife hearing loss, braiding their stories with her own to illuminate the startling effects of the condition. The result is a surprisingly engaging account of what it's like to live with an invisible disability—and a robust prescription for our nation's increasing problem with deafness. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013